Thomas Aquinas on the Metaphysics of the Human Act

This book offers a novel account of Aquinas's theory of the human act.

Thomas Aquinas on the Metaphysics of the Human Act

"Our first task is to gain clarity on the notion of the "human act" (actus humanus), which is at the heart of Aquinas's action-theoretical project. What does Aquinas understand by this term? To answer this question, it will be convenient to proceed in two steps. First, we need to understand what makes a human act an act, 'act' being, as I noted in the Introduction, a broad term referring to any kind of power-exercise, according to Aquinas. This requires us to say something about Aquinas's general metaphysics of powers and hylomorphism (1.2-1.3). In a next step, given the broad scope of the term 'act' in Aquinas, we need to consider what makes something a specifically human act. Here we need to consider how Aquinas differentiates human acts from other power-exercises in nature (1.4-1.6). As we will see, Aquinas appeals to the aetiological factor of choice to do so. We will also see that choice as well as the human act itself are hylomorphic composites, for Aquinas, and that the human act explained by choice is intentional and free"--

Thomas Aquinas on the Metaphysics of the Human Act

To see what human acts lead to happiness and why, he holds, we must first gain clarity on what the human act is and how it is explained.7 For this reason, Aquinas provides in a number of texts that belong to his moral philosophy ...

Thomas Aquinas on the Metaphysics of the Human Act

This book offers a novel account of Aquinas's theory of the human act. It argues that Aquinas takes a human act to be a composite of two power-exercises, where one relates to the other as form to matter. The formal component is an act of the will, and the material component is a power-exercise caused by the will, which Aquinas refers to as the 'commanded act.' The book also argues that Aquinas conceptualizes the act of free choice as a hylomorphic composite: it is, materially, an act of the will, but it inherits a form from reason. As the book aims to show, the core idea of Aquinas's hylomorphic action theory is that the exercise of one power can structure the exercise of another power, and this provides a helpful way to think of the presence of cognition in conation and of intention in bodily movement.

Human Action in Thomas Aquinas John Duns Scotus and William of Ockham

This book sets out a thematic presentation of human action, especially as it relates to morality, in the three most significant figures in Medieval Scholastic thought: Thomas Aquinas, John Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham

Human Action in Thomas Aquinas  John Duns Scotus  and William of Ockham

This book sets out a thematic presentation of human action, especially as it relates to morality, in the three most significant figures in Medieval Scholastic thought: Thomas Aquinas, John Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham

The Treatise on Happiness The Treatise on Human Acts

The fifth volume of The Hackett Aquinas, a series of central philosophical treatises of Aquinas in new, state-of-the-art translations accompanied by a thorough commentary on the text.

The Treatise on Happiness     The Treatise on Human Acts

The fifth volume of The Hackett Aquinas, a series of central philosophical treatises of Aquinas in new, state-of-the-art translations accompanied by a thorough commentary on the text. Acclaim for previous volumes in the series: The Treatise on Human Nature Translated, with Commentary, by Robert Pasnau "This very readable and accurate translation of the so-called Treatise on Human Nature strikes the right balance between literal rendition of Aquinas' Latin and naturalness of English expression, and thus will be of use both to new students of Aquinas and to those familiar with the original Latin. The commentary on the text should make the translation especially suitable for use in courses on Aquinas' philosophy of human nature and theory of knowledge." —Deborah Black, University of Toronto The Treatise on the Divine Nature Translated, with Commentary, by Brian J. Shanley, O.P. "That Shanley's translation-cum-commentary can open students to such a rich appropriation of Aquinas explains why I call it 'superb.'" —David Burrell, The Thomist Disputed Questions on Virtue Translated by Jeffrey Hause and Claudia Eisen Murphy; Commentary by Jeffrey Hause "Hause and Murphy are to be congratulated. [Their volume's] strong points are numerous and important. The translation is clear and faithful. . . . Hause offers an extended commentary which is solid and helpful for beginning readers. . . . A gem." —R. E. Houser, Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews

Ethica Thomistica

McInerny revisits the basics of Thomas's teachings and offers a brief, intelligible, and persuasive summary.

Ethica Thomistica

McInerny revisits the basics of Thomas's teachings and offers a brief, intelligible, and persuasive summary.

John Duns Scotus

Thomas Williams presents the most extensive collection of John Duns Scotus's work on ethics and moral psychology available in English.

John Duns Scotus

Thomas Williams presents the most extensive collection of John Duns Scotus's work on ethics and moral psychology available in English. John Duns Scotus: Selected Writings on Ethics includes extended discussions-and as far as possible, complete questions-on divine and human freedom, the moral attributes of God, the relationship between will and intellect, moral and intellectual virtue, practical reasoning, charity, the metaphysics of goodness and rightness, the various acts, affections, and passions of the will, justice, the natural law, sin, marriage and divorce, the justification for private property, and lying and perjury. Relying on the recently completed critical edition of the Ordinatio and other critically edited texts, this collection presents the most reliable and up-to-date versions of Scotus's work in an accessible and philosophically informed translation.

Right And Reason

Phrased in non-technical language, Right and Reason is a thoroughly competent book in the philosophy of Ethics, which gives the science of morality from the Aristotelian-Thomistic, common-sense school of thought--which is none other than ...

Right And Reason

Ethics both in theory and practice. Phrased in non-technical language, Right and Reason is a thoroughly competent book in the philosophy of Ethics, which gives the science of morality from the Aristotelian-Thomistic, common-sense school of thought--which is none other than the Perennial Philosophy of the Ages, the philosophy outside of which one's positions quickly become absurd and all reasoning ends up in dead-ends. Impr.

The Ethics of St Thomas Aquinas

This book presents Aquinas's thought on such central questions as man's happiness, how to determine the morality of our actions, the natural law and the main virtues, as well as on the common good, war, human labour, love and friendship.

The Ethics of St  Thomas Aquinas

The far reaching changes in man's social and personal life taking place in our lifetime underline the need for a sound ethical evaluation of our rights and duties and of human behaviour both on the individual level and in the political society. On many issues judgments of value vary widely and a consultation of the thought of Thomas Aquinas on the basic questions will be helpful, the more since he is not only one of the greatest philosophers but also succeeded in integrating in his moral philosophy the wisdom of the ancients, in particular of Aristotle and the Stoa. This book presents Aquinas's thought on such central questions as man's happiness, how to determine the morality of our actions, the natural law and the main virtues, as well as on the common good, war, human labour, love and friendship. Throughout the book the intellectual character of this moral philosophy is pointed out and problems are set in a historical perspective.

Subjectivity and Knowledge in the Philosophy of Saint Thomas Aquinas

The philosophers of the middle Ages were profoundly interested in the metaphysical explanation of reality.

Subjectivity and Knowledge in the Philosophy of Saint Thomas Aquinas

The philosophers of the middle Ages were profoundly interested in the metaphysical explanation of reality. None of them questioned the validity of human knowledge; they took for granted the intellect's capacity to arrive at truth and to construct valid sciences. Problems raised by the medievals concerning human knowledge were those of the Universals, of it is not surprising to find St Thomas Aquinas treating the problem of knowledge under its metaphysical aspect. Many present-day thinkers claim that even within the metaphysical explanation of knowledge, the Scholastic speculations centred round the object and the objectivity of knowledge without giving importance to the knowing subject and the spiritual riches of subjectivity. The modern age is often called the age of the discovery of subjectivity, of the triumph of the thinking subject and his interiority over the anonymous, impersonal and exterior object.

The Ethics of Aquinas

Here Summa is a moral theology depends on one's Thomas differentiates internal from external notion of moral theology . principles , just as in ... “ Only the metaphysics of act God at last appears as the metaphysician asks about that .

The Ethics of Aquinas

In this comprehensive anthology, twenty-seven outstanding scholars from North America and Europe address every major aspect of Thomas Aquinas's understanding of morality and comment on his remarkable legacy. The opening chapters of The Ethics of Aquinas introduce readers to the sources, methods, and major themes of Aquinas's ethics. Part II of the book provides an extended discussion of ideas in the Second Part of the Summa Theologiae, in which contributors present cogent interpretations of the structure, major arguments, and themes of each of the treatises. The third and final part examines the legacy of Thomistic ethics for the twentieth century and today. These essays reflect a diverse group of scholars representing a variety of intellectual perspectives. Contributors span numerous fields of study, including intellectual history, medieval studies, moral philosophy, religious ethics, and moral theology. This remarkable variety underscores how interpretations of Thomas's ethics continue to develop and evolve -- and stimulate fervent discussion within the academy and the church. Book jacket.

Treatise on Happiness

The Treatise on Happiness and the accompanying Treatise on Human Acts comprise the first twenty-one questions of I-II of the Summa Theologiae.

Treatise on Happiness

The Treatise on Happiness and the accompanying Treatise on Human Acts comprise the first twenty-one questions of I-II of the Summa Theologiae. From his careful consideration of what true happiness is, to his comprehensive discussion of how it can be attained, St. Thomas Aquinas offers a challenging and classic statement of the goals of human life, both ultimate and proximate. This translation presents in accurate, consistent, contemporary English the great Christian thinker's enduring contributions on the subject of man's happiness.

Perfecting Human Actions

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: John Rziha is associate professor of theology at Benedictine College. PRAISE FOR THE BOOK: "[A] competent and indeed masterful study. . .

Perfecting Human Actions

During the last few centuries, a practical dichotomy between God and humans has developed within moral theory. As a result, moral theory tends to focus only on humans where human autonomy is foundational or only on God where divine commands capriciously rule. However, the moral theology of Thomas Aquinas overcomes this dichotomy. For Thomas, humans reach their perfection by participating in God's wisdom and love. Perfecting Human Actions explores the ways humans participate in eternal law--God's wisdom that guides and moves all things to their proper action. The book begins with a thoughtful examination of the philosophic recovery of the notion of participation in Thomistic metaphysics. It then explains Thomas's theological understanding of the notion of participation to show how humans are related to God. It is discovered that when performing human actions, humans participate in the eternal law in two ways: as moved and governed by it, and cognitively. In reference to participation as moved and governed, humans are directed by God to their proper end of eternal happiness. This mode of participation can be increased by perfecting the natural inclinations through virtue, grace, and the gifts of the Holy Spirit. In reference to cognitive participation, humans as rational creatures can know their proper end and how to attain it. Through this knowledge of moral truths, the intellect participates in the eternal law. Cognitive participation is perfected by the intellectual virtues (especially faith) and the gifts of the Holy Spirit (especially wisdom). The book concludes by showing how the notion of human participation in the eternal law is a much better foundation for moral theory than the contemporary notion of autonomy. ABOUT THE AUTHOR: John Rziha is associate professor of theology at Benedictine College. PRAISE FOR THE BOOK: "[A] competent and indeed masterful study. . . . Rziha's book is to be welcomed as not just an important, but indeed an overdue contribution to the contemporary recovery of Aquinas's moral theory. More importantly, this study is of surpassing importance in advancing the correct understanding of the relationship between human freedom and natural law. . . . Rziha's lucidly written and well-documented study displays all the characteristics of a competent and learned interpretation of the thought of the doctor communis according to the highest standards of current Aquinas scholarship."--Reinhard Hutter, Thomist "Rziha explores at length the two modes by which human participate in God's eternal law: as moved and governed by it and as having knowledge of it. . . . [T]his book proves to be something of a comprehensive course in Thomistic thought. This project is supported by extensive and meticulous footnote reverences to texts of Aquinas." --Janine Marie Idziak, Speculum

Thomas Aquinas on Moral Wrongdoing

Medieval thinkers were both puzzled and fascinated by the capacity of human beings to do what is morally wrong. In this book, Colleen McCluskey offers the first comprehensive examination of Thomas Aquinas' explanation for moral wrongdoing.

Thomas Aquinas on Moral Wrongdoing

Medieval thinkers were both puzzled and fascinated by the capacity of human beings to do what is morally wrong. In this book, Colleen McCluskey offers the first comprehensive examination of Thomas Aquinas' explanation for moral wrongdoing. Her discussion takes in Aquinas' theory of human nature and action, and his explanation of wrong action in terms of defects in human capacities including the intellect, the will, and the passions of the sensory appetite. She also looks at the notion of privation, which underlies Aquinas' account of wrongdoing, as well as his theory of the vices, which intersects with his basic account. The result is a thorough exploration of Aquinas' psychology which is both accessible and illuminating, and will be of interest to a wide range of readers in Aquinas studies, medieval philosophy, the history of theology, and the history of ideas.

The Cambridge History of Later Medieval Philosophy

The second is Aquinas ' equally sharp distinction between the complete human acts in which the human capacities of will and intellect are exercised , and the exercises of those powers which go to make up complete human acts .

The Cambridge History of Later Medieval Philosophy

A history of philosophy from 1100-1600 concentrating on the Aristotelian tradition in the Latin Christian West. "will long remain the major guide to later medieval philosophy and related topics. Most of the essays are exciting and challenging, some of them truly brilliant." --Speculum

A Summary of Philosophy

This compact collection of philosophical texts from the Summa Theologica -- on God, creation, the soul, human acts, moral good and evil, love, habits, virtue, and law -- is presented newly translated in abridged form and cast in a modified ...

A Summary of Philosophy

This compact collection of philosophical texts from the Summa Theologica -- on God, creation, the soul, human acts, moral good and evil, love, habits, virtue, and law -- is presented newly translated in abridged form and cast in a modified version of the medieval quaestio. Included are only the most important objections and Aquinas' replies; appeals to scriptural, theological, and philosophical authorities have been omitted. Unlike the ordering of the originals, questions and answers are here presented prior to objections and replies; the result is a sharp, rich, topically organised question-answer presentation of Aquinas' major philosophical arguments within a brief compass. A general Introduction, head notes, a glossary, an index, and a select bibliography offer expert guidance to the work of this major philosopher.

Philosophy of Thomas Aquinas on Justice and Human Rights

Aquinas stated thus: “the true proximate rule to norm by which we judge the objective morality of human act is right reason.”192 On this issue, the right reason for a righteous living is taking to mean here a rule or norm of human act.

Philosophy of Thomas Aquinas on Justice and Human Rights

"A type of book we always long to read for peace and joy in any nation, Father Dr. JoeBarth Abba touched many areas amidst orgies of circles of terrorisms, Islamic insurgents with key solutions for psycho-dialogical ways on cultural ethnic tensions for conflicts resolution." --Gerhard Ludwig Cardinal Mueller, Vatican, Rome ***The book presents an inquiry into the thoughts and scholasticism of Thomas Aquinas, his classical philosophical synthesis, his insights, and the quest for Justice and Human Rights as a panacea or desired urgent solution to racial justice, abuse of human life, and human rights. Dissertation. (Series: Philosophy / Philosophie, Vol. 108) [Subject: African Studies, Human Rights Studies, Philosophy, Christian Studies, Thomas Aquinas]

The Metaphysics of Being of St Thomas Aquinas

St. Augustine connects the possibility of moral evil with the fact that under the human will lies nothingness . ... It is true that God is the cause of the content of being in any human act , just as all beings exist by participating in ...

The Metaphysics of Being of St  Thomas Aquinas

Metaphysics, formerly the queen of science, fell into oblivion under the onslaught of empiricism and positivism and its very possibllity came to be denied. Professor Elders traces the history of this process and shows how St. Thomas innovated in determining both the subject of metaphysics and the manner in which one enters this science, particularly in the framework of his Aristotle commentaries. The work then considers being and its properties, its divisions into being in act and being in potency, into the act of being essence, and into substance and the accidents. Finally the causes of being are considered. The work also introduces and surveys the extensive literature of Thomas interpretation of the past 50 years.

St Thomas Aquinas

The selections in this volume illustrate the philosophical views of St. Thomas on God, creation, the material world, the problem of evil, human psychology and morality, aesthetics, justice, the nature of law and political science.

St  Thomas Aquinas

The importance of St. Thomas Aquinas in the history of medieval philosophy is beyond dispute. Even medieval philosophers and theologians who disagreed with St. Thomas were careful to take his positions into account. The selections in this volume illustrate the philosophical views of St. Thomas on God, creation, the material world, the problem of evil, human psychology and morality, aesthetics, justice, the nature of law and political science. In his philosophy St. Thomas considered those subjects to the extent they were accessible to unaided human reason.

A Treatise of Legal Philosophy and General Jurisprudence

Volume 7: The Jurists' Philosophy of Law from Rome to the Seventeenth Century, Volume 8: A History of the ... The parallel between things and human acts of ethical relevance is stated in various instances by Thomas Aquinas: “One has to ...

A Treatise of Legal Philosophy and General Jurisprudence

The first-ever multivolume treatment of the issues in legal philosophy and general jurisprudence, from both a theoretical and a historical perspective. The work is aimed at jurists as well as legal and practical philosophers. Edited by the renowned theorist Enrico Pattaro and his team, this book is a classical reference work that would be of great interest to legal and practical philosophers as well as to jurists and legal scholar at all levels. The work is divided The theoretical part (published in 2005), consisting of five volumes, covers the main topics of the contemporary debate; the historical part, consisting of six volumes (Volumes 6-8 published in 2007; Volumes 9 and 10, published in 2009; Volume 11 published in 2011 and volume 12 forthcoming in 2015), accounts for the development of legal thought from ancient Greek times through the twentieth century. The entire set will be completed with an index. ​Volume 7: The Jurists’ Philosophy of Law from Rome to the Seventeenth Century edited by Andrea Padovani and Peter Stein Volume 7 is the second of the historical volumes and acts as a complement to the previous Volume 6, discussing from the jurists’ perspective what that previous volume discusses from the philosophers’ perspective. The subjects of analysis are, first, the Roman jurists’ conception of law, second, the metaphysical and logical presuppositions of late medieval legal science, and, lastly, the connection between legal and political thought up to the 17th century. The discussion shows how legal science proceeds at every step of the way, from Rome to early modern times, as an enterprise that cannot be untangled from other forms of thought, thus giving rise to an interest in logic, medieval theology, philosophy, and politics—all areas where legal science has had an influence. Volume 8: A History of the Philosophy of Law in The Common Law World, 1600–1900 by Michael Lobban Volume 8, the third of the historical volumes, offers a history of legal philosophy in common-law countries from the 17th to the 19th century. Its main focus (like that of Volume 9) is on the ways in which jurists and legal philosophers thought about law and legal reasoning. The volume begins with a discussion of the ‘common law mind’ as it evolved in late medieval and early modern England. It goes on to examine the different jurisprudential traditions which developed in England and the United States, showing that while Coke’s vision of the common law continued to exert a strong influence on American jurists, in England a more positivist approach took root, which found its fullest articulation in the work of Bentham and Austin. ​

St Thomas Aquinas and the Natural Law Tradition

To explore and evaluate the current revival, this volume brings together many of the foremost scholars on natural law. They examine the relation between Thomistic natural law and the larger philosophical and theological tradition.

St  Thomas Aquinas and the Natural Law Tradition

To explore and evaluate the current revival, this volume brings together many of the foremost scholars on natural law. They examine the relation between Thomistic natural law and the larger philosophical and theological tradition. Furthermore, they assess the contemporary relevance of St. Thomas's natural law doctrine to current legal and political philosophy.