Thomas Seebohm on the Foundations of the Sciences

Sciences,. and. Disinterested. Observers: A. Dialogue. Between. Alfred. Schutz. and. Thomas. Seebohm. Michael D. Barber Abstract Thomas Seebohm does not recognize sufficiently that Alfred Schutz would have been open to the contributions ...

Thomas Seebohm on the Foundations of the Sciences

This book explores the work of Thomas Seebohm (1934-2014), a leading phenomenologist and hermeneuticist. It features papers that offer a critical and constructive dialogue about Seebohm’s analyses and their implications for the sciences. The net result is an in-depth study and a helpful overview of Seebohm’s general approach and his specific views on various areas of modern science. The contributors focus especially upon his final text, History as a Science and the System of the Sciences. They view this as the culmination and summary of his historical and phenomenological investigations into the foundations, nature, and limits of modern sciences. This includes not just history but the Geisteswissenschaften more generally, along with the social and natural sciences as well. The essays in this volume reflect that range. This volume presents insightful discussions about the nature and legitimacy of the human sciences as sciences and the unique character of the social sciences. It will be of interest not just as a matter of historical scholarship, but also and above all as an important contribution to phenomenology and to the philosophy of science and the sciences as such. It deserves attention by scholars from any philosophical tradition interested in thinking about the foundations of their disciplines and a philosophy of science that includes, but is not limited to, the natural sciences.

Thomas Seebohm on the Foundations of the Sciences

The essays in this volume reflect that range. This volume presents insightful discussions about the nature and legitimacy of the human sciences as sciences and the unique character of the social sciences.

Thomas Seebohm on the Foundations of the Sciences

This book explores the work of Thomas Seebohm (1934-2014), a leading phenomenologist and hermeneuticist. It features papers that offer a critical and constructive dialogue about Seebohm's analyses and their implications for the sciences. The net result is an in-depth study and a helpful overview of Seebohm's general approach and his specific views on various areas of modern science. The contributors focus especially upon his final text, History as a Science and the System of the Sciences. They view this as the culmination and summary of his historical and phenomenological investigations into the foundations, nature, and limits of modern sciences. This includes not just history but the Geisteswissenschaften more generally, along with the social and natural sciences as well. The essays in this volume reflect that range. This volume presents insightful discussions about the nature and legitimacy of the human sciences as sciences and the unique character of the social sciences. It will be of interest not just as a matter of historical scholarship, but also and above all as an important contribution to phenomenology and to the philosophy of science and the sciences as such. It deserves attention by scholars from any philosophical tradition interested in thinking about the foundations of their disciplines and a philosophy of science that includes, but is not limited to, the natural sciences.

The Husserlian Foundations of Science

Concerning Husserl's concept of philosophy, compare Thomas Seebohm, Die Bedingungen der Möglichkeit der Transzendentalphilosophie (Bonn: H. Bouvier Verlag, 1962), especially 39ff. Further, Ludwig Landgrebe, Der Weg der Phänomenologie.

The Husserlian Foundations of Science

This book starts with a representation of Husserl's idea of phenomenology as a foundational theory of science. The following essays elucidate the main features of the phenomenological method as worked out by Husserl in the course of the development of his philosophy - starting from merely 'descriptive' and going on to 'transcendental' and 'constitutive' phenomenology - in order to get access to the foundations of knowledge in general and of scientific knowledge in particular. Further essays deal with the Husserlian foundations of natural science, and the relations between phenomenology and psychology, as well as those between phenomenology and history. This second revised and enlarged edition - the first appeared in 1987 and was edited by Lee Hardy - contains two further essays: one deals with Husserl's never abandoned idea of phenomenology as a rigorous science and his further claim to restore phenomenological philosophy as 'First Philosophy', and the other one on the problem of crisis of the Western culture Husserl was concerned with during several periods of his life, demonstrates the actuality of his phenomenology even for philosophy of science in our times.

Phenomenological Approaches to Physics

From the epistemology of physics to the phenomenology of nature: Some reflections in the wake of Seebohm's theses. In T. Nenon (Ed.), Thomas Seebohm on the foundations of the sciences. An analysis and critical appraisal.

Phenomenological Approaches to Physics

This book offers fresh perspective on the role of phenomenology in the philosophy of physics which opens new avenues for discussion among physicists, "standard" philosophers of physics and philosophers with phenomenological leanings. Much has been written on the interrelations between philosophy and physics in the late 19th and early 20th century, and on the emergence of philosophy of science as an autonomous philosophical sub-discipline. This book is about the under-explored role of phenomenology in the development and the philosophical interpretation of 20th century physics. Part 1 examines questions about the origins and value of phenomenological approaches to physics. Does the work of classical phenomenologists such as Husserl, Merleau-Ponty or Heidegger contain elements of systematic value to both the practice and our philosophical understanding of physics? How did classical phenomenology influence “standard” philosophy of science in the Anglo-American and other traditions? Part 2 probes questions on the role of phenomenology in the philosophies of physics and science: - Can phenomenology help to solve “Wigner’s puzzle”, the problem of the "unreasonable effectiveness" of mathematics in describing, explaining and predicting empirical phenomena? - Does phenomenology allow better understanding of the principle of gauge invariance at the core of the standard model of contemporary particle physics? - Does the phenomenological notion of “Lifeworld” stand in opposition to the “scientific metaphysics” movement, or is there potential for dialogue? Part 3 examines the measurement problem. Is the solution outlined by Fritz London and Edmond Bauer merely a re-statement of von Neumann’s view, or should it be regarded as a distinctively phenomenological take on the measurement problem? Is phenomenology a serious contender in continuing discussions of foundational questions of quantum mechanics? Can other interpretational frameworks such as quantum Bayesianism benefit from implementing phenomenological notions such as constitution or horizonal intentionality?

History as a Science and the System of the Sciences

Phenomenological Investigations Thomas M. Seebohm. Moments can only be given in foundations connecting them with other moments. Clusters of moments connected by foundations are pieces only if the cluster includes an abstract moment of ...

History as a Science and the System of the Sciences

This volume goes beyond presently available phenomenological analyses based on the structures and constitution of the lifeworld. It shows how the science of history is the mediator between the human and the natural sciences. It demonstrates that the distinction between interpretation and explanation does not imply a strict separation of the natural and the human sciences. Finally, it shows that the natural sciences and technology are inseparable, but that technology is one-sidedly founded in pre-scientific encounters with reality in the lifeworld. In positivism the natural sciences are sciences because they offer causal explanations testable in experiments and the humanities are human sciences only if they use methods of the natural sciences. For epistemologists following Dilthey, the human sciences presuppose interpretation and the human and natural sciences must be separated. There is phenomenology interested in psychology and the social sciences that distinguish the natural and the human sciences, but little can be found about the historical human sciences. This volume fills the gap by presenting analyses of the material foundations of the "understanding" of expressions of other persons, and of primordial recollections and expectations founding explicit expectations and predictions in the lifeworld. Next, it shows, on the basis of history as applying philological methods in interpretations of sources, the role of a universal spatio-temporal framework for reconstructions and causal explanations of "what has really happened".

In between

... and Time by Charles M. Sherover Pragmatism Considers Phenomenology edited by Robert S. Corrington , Carl Hausman , and Thomas M. Seebohm Philosophy In and Out of Europe Marjorie Grene Husserlian Foundations of Science by Elisabeth ...

In between

This book introduces a new category, in-between, that will have a far-reaching impact on classic ways of thinking. Husserl's description of consciousness and Whitehead's criticism of the prejudice of simple location are two starting points. Relativity theory's radical changes in the conception of space and time also motivate some of the lines of thought. The initial two chapters are devoted to preparatory analysis. The first presents an argument against visual reasoning; the second compares the role of relations to the role of terms. The balance of the volume discusses in-between in general, then its role in linguistics, history, ethics, and aesthetics, and finally in intersubjectivity and the faculties of the mind. Co-published with the Center for Advanced Research in Phenomenology.

Historical Dictionary of Husserl s Philosophy

In Phenomenology and the Formal Sciences., edited by Thomas M. Seebohm et al., 25–34. ... Phenomenology and the Theory of Science. ... Harvey, Charles W. Husserl's Phenomenology and the Foundations of Natural Science.

Historical Dictionary of Husserl s Philosophy

Historical Dictionary of Husserl's Philosophy, Second Edition contains a chronology, an introduction, and an extensive bibliography. The dictionary section has more than 600 cross-referenced entries on his key concepts and major writings as well as entries on his most important predecessors, contemporaries, and successors.

Phenomenology on Kant German Idealism Hermeneutics and Logic

Philosophical Essays in Honor of Thomas M. Seebohm O.K. Wiegand, Robert J. Dostal, Lester Embree, J.J. Kockelmans, ... an effort to give a transcendental foundation to the Human Sciences and particularly to their method, Hermeneutics, ...

Phenomenology on Kant  German Idealism  Hermeneutics and Logic

Joseph 1. Kockelmans Pennsylvania State University In July of 1999, Prof. Dr. Thomas M. Seebohm turned 65 years old, and thus en tered mandatory retirement. His friends, colleagues, and former students thought that it would be fitting to celebrate the event of his retirement with a volume of essays in his honor, in order to render homage to a great human being, an outstanding and dedicated teacher, a highly regarded philosopher and scholar, but above all a dear friend and colleague. When the editors thought about a unifying theme for the anthology, they finally settled on the research interests of Professor Seebohm; in their view the vast do main of his competence and interests would leave all participants the freedom to select a topic of their own choice that would nonetheless lie within this large realm as well as within the area of their own research interests. Professor Seebohm's research interests encompass work in Phenomenology, Hermeneutics, German Idealism (Kant in particular), History of Philosophy, Phi losophy of the formal sciences (of Logic in particular), Philosophy of History, Methodology and Philosophy of the Human Sciences, (including Psychology and Sociology), History of 19th Century British Empiricism (Mill), American Pragma tism, Analytic Philosophy, Philosophy of Law and Practical Philosophy, the devel opment of the history of philosophy in Eastern Europe, especially in the Middle Ages, but also in the nineteenth century.

Critique of Pure Reason Second Edition

(2001 b) 'Matter and Motion in the Metaphysical Foundations and the First Critique: the Empirical Concept of Matter ... (2006c) 'Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science' in Bird (ed.) (2006a). Funke, Gerhard and Seebohm, Thomas M.

Critique of Pure Reason  Second Edition

Kant's Critique of Pure Reason is one of the most rewarding of all philosophical works. The text follows the second edition of 1787, with a translation of all first edition passages altered or omitted. For this reissue of Kemp Smith's classic 1929 edition, Gary Banham contributes a major new Bibliography of secondary sources on Kant.

Encyclopedia of Phenomenology

... William R. McKenna, Algis Mickunas, Jitendra Nath Mohanty, Thomas M. Seebohm, Richard M. Zaner (eds.) ... scientific, scientific technologies and techniques can be spoken of There are also evaluational foundations in, e.g., ...

Encyclopedia of Phenomenology

This encyclopedia presents phenomenological thought and the phenomenological movement within philosophy and within more than a score of other disciplines on a level accessible to professional colleagues of other orientations as well as to advanced undergraduate and graduate students. Entries average 3,000 words. In practically all cases, they include lists of works "For Further Study." The Introduction briefly chronicles the changing phenomenological agenda and compares phenomenology with other 20th Century movements. The 166 entries are a baut matters of seven sorts: ( 1) the faur broad tendencies and periods within the phenomenological movement; (2) twenty-three national traditions ofphenomenology; (3) twenty-two philosophical sub-disciplines, including those referred to with the formula "the philosophy of x"; (4) phenomenological tendencies within twenty-one non-philosophical dis ciplines; (5) forty major phenomenological topics; (6) twenty-eight leading phenomenological figures; and (7) twenty-seven non-phenomenological figures and movements ofinteresting sim ilarities and differences with phenomenology. Conventions Concern ing persons, years ofbirth and death are given upon first mention in an entry ofthe names of deceased non-phenomenologists. The names of persons believed tobe phenomenologists and also, for cross-referencing purposes, the titles of other entries are printed entirely in SMALL CAPITAL letters, also upon first mention. In addition, all words thus occurring in all small capital letters are listed in the index with the numbers of all pages on which they occur. To facilitate indexing, Chinese, Hungarian, and Japanese names have been re-arranged so that the personal name precedes the family name.

The Idea of Social Science and Proper Phenomenology

Phenomenology and the Foundations of the Social Sciences (Ideas, Volume III by Edmund Husserl). ... Positivistic Philosophy and the Actual Approach of Interpretative Social Science: An Ineditum of Alfred Schutz from ... Seebohm, Thomas.

The Idea of Social Science and Proper Phenomenology

This monograph examines an academic discipline in crisis. The author claims that this field concerned with society and relationships is in trouble. No one can seem to agree on what it does or how to go about doing it. His insightful argument revives the thought of key phenomenologists often no longer considered in social science. Looking predominantly at debates within religious studies, this book uncovers certain misguided presuppositions which have strongly influenced scholars in the field. This reflects itself in a Weberian Ideal regarding the institutional place of science in the universities and a failure to properly consider the epistemic status of knowledge produced for its own sake. But even recognizing these issues will not get to the core of the crisis. It will not help scholars better understand what it is to be human. To address this, the author digs deeper. He draws on the philosophical phenomenology of Husserl’s Phenomenological Movement to critique our very idea of social science. In the process, he presents a radical approach to the question of humanity. This volume concludes that, properly understood, social science is a hobby. It deserves no special place in the university. Indeed, if it is to be pursued properly, it requires a fundamentally revised understanding of humanity. The author argues this not of the sake of controversy. Rather, his intention is to affect the necessary shift in our understanding that will enable future constructive solutions.

Phenomenology of the Cultural Disciplines

If * Phenomenological foundation, which is a relation between founding and founded strata within a concrete intentive ... Cf. Thomas Seebohm, Dagfinn Fällesdal, and J. N. Mohanty, edd., Phenomenology and the Formal Sciences (Dordrecht: ...

Phenomenology of the Cultural Disciplines

Phenomenology of the Cultural Disciplines is an interdisciplinary study, reflecting the recent emergence of various particular forms of `phenomenological philosophy of ...'. Included are such fields as psychology, social sciences and history, as well as environmental philosophy, ethnic studies, religion and even more practical disciplines, such as medicine, psychiatry, politics, and technology. The Introduction provides a way of understanding how these various developments are integrated. On the basis of a Husserlian notion of culture, it proposes a generic concept of `cultural disciplines' (which is broader than but inclusive of `human sciences') which subsumes the more specific concepts of `cultural sciences', `axiotic disciplines' (e.g. architecture), and `practical disciplines'.

Metametaphysics and the Sciences

Frege was an antipsychologist in various ways, one of them being his view that the foundations of logic do not lie in ... Thomas Seebohm argued as early as 1989 that on Frege's view, the existence of mathematical objects and logical ...

Metametaphysics and the Sciences

This collection addresses metaphysical issues at the intersection between philosophy and science. A unique feature is the way in which it is guided both by history of philosophy, by interaction between philosophy and science, and by methodological awareness. In asking how metaphysics is possible in an age of science, the contributors draw on philosophical tools provided by three great thinkers who were fully conversant with and actively engaged with the sciences of their day: Kant, Husserl, and Frege. Part I sets out frameworks for scientifically informed metaphysics in accordance with the meta-metaphysics outlined by these three self-reflective philosophers. Part II explores the domain for co-existent metaphysics and science. Constraints on ambitious critical metaphysics are laid down in close consideration of logic, meta-theory, and specific conditions for science. Part III exemplifies the role of language and science in contemporary metaphysics. Quine’s pursuit of truth is analysed; Cantor’s absolute infinitude is reconstrued in modal terms; and sense is made of Weyl’s take on the relationship between mathematics and empirical aspects of physics. With chapters by leading scholars, Metametaphysics and the Sciences is an in-depth resource for researchers and advanced students working within metaphysics, philosophy of science, and the history of philosophy.

Overcoming Psychologism Husserl and the Transcendental Reform of Psychology

In Foundations of morality, human rights, and the human sciences, ed. ... Hugh J. Silverman, John Sallis, and Thomas M. Seebohm, 64–89. ... In International conference on phenomenology and the formal sciences.

Overcoming Psychologism  Husserl and the Transcendental Reform of Psychology

This book shows us how rather than abandoning psychology once he liberated phenomenology from the psychologism of the philosophy of arithmetic, Edmund Husserl remained concerned with the ways in which phenomenology held important implications for a radical reform of psychology throughout his intellectual career. The author fleshes out what such a radical reform actually entails, and proposes that it can only be accomplished by following the trail of the transcendental reduction described in Husserl’s later works. In order to appreciate the need for the transcendental even for psychology, the book tracks Husserl’s thinking on the nature of this relationship between phenomenology as a philosophy and psychology as a positive science as it evolved over time. The text covers Husserl’s definition of phenomenology as “descriptive psychology” in the Logical Investigations, rejecting the hybrid form of “phenomenological psychology” described in the lectures by that name, and ends with his proposal for a “fundamental refashioning” of psychology by situating it within the transcendental framework of The Crisis of European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology. The Author argues for a re-grounding of psychology by virtue of a “return to positivity” after having performed the reduction to transcendental intersubjectivity. What results is a phenomenological approach to a transcendentally-grounded psychology which, while having returned to the life-world, no longer remains transcendentally naïve. A phenomenologically-grounded psychology thus empowers researchers, clinicians, and clients alike to engage in social actions that move the world closer to achieving social justice for all. This text appeals to students and researchers working in phenomenology and psychology.

Kant s Critique of the Power of Judgment

Proceedings of the Sixth International Kant Congress, vol. ii/2, edited by Gerhard Funke and Thomas M. Seebohm (Washington, ... See, for example, Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science 4:477, 536. For “material mechanism” see ...

Kant s Critique of the Power of Judgment

Includes twelve of the most important modern critical discussions of the Critique of the Power of Judgment, written by the leading Kant scholars and aestheticians of the twentieth century.

Proceedings of the Sixth International Kant Congress

Gerhard Funke, Thomas M. Seebohm ... On the one hand , this philosophy of science ( especially as represented by the Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science ( MFNS ) appears to be intimately wedded to the details of Newtonian ...

Proceedings of the Sixth International Kant Congress

The proceedings of the Sixth International Kant Congress are published in three volumes which contain almost 100 essays on the prehistory of Kant's philosophy, the transcendental analytic and dialectic, Kant's practical philosophy, his anthropology, and his theories of art and science. Representing a cross-section of international (North and South American, European, Russian, and Asian) perspectives on Kant and his work, the authors of the essays included in this volume of proceedings offer a survey of the latest achievements in Kant research. Contents: Transcendental Dialectic and Transcendental Doctrine of Method; Philosophy of Science and Mathematics; Critique of Practical Reason; Metaphysics of Morality and Law; Aesthetics, Theology, nthropology, History, and Religion. Co-published with the Center for Advanced Research in Phenomenology.

Hermeneutic Philosophy of Science Van Gogh s Eyes and God

A foundation can be one-sided, i.e., asymmetrical. 2. ... Seen from a formal point of view, deliberately complex structures of foundations are possible. ... Such intrinsic relations are one-sidedly founded in two or 148 THOMAS SEEBOHM.

Hermeneutic Philosophy of Science  Van Gogh   s Eyes  and God

This richly textured book bridges analytic and hermeneutic and phenomenological philosophy of science. It features unique resources for students of the philosophy and history of quantum mechanics and the Copenhagen Interpretation, cognitive theory and the psychology of perception, the history and philosophy of art, and the pragmatic and historical relationships between religion and science.

Introduction to Phenomenology

Seebohm, Thomas. “Psychologism Revisited”, Phenomenology and the Formal Sciences. Ed. T. Seebohm, D. Føllesdal and J. N. Moriarty. ... The Husserlian Foundations of Science. Ed. Lee Hardy. Washington, DC: Center for Advanced Research in ...

Introduction to Phenomenology

Introduction to Phenomenology is an outstanding and comprehensive guide to phenomenology. Dermot Moran lucidly examines the contributions of phenomenology's nine seminal thinkers: Brentano, Husserl, Heidegger, Gadamer, Arendt, Levinas, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty and Derrida. Written in a clear and engaging style, Introduction to Phenomenology charts the course of the phenomenological movement from its origins in Husserl to its transformation by Derrida. It describes the thought of Heidegger and Sartre, phenomonology's most famous thinkers, and introduces and assesses the distinctive use of phenomonology by some of its lesser known exponents, such as Levinas, Arendt and Gadamer. Throughout the book, the enormous influence of phenomenology on the course of twentieth-century philosophy is thoroughly explored. This is an indispensible introduction for all unfamiliar with this much talked about but little understood school of thought. Technical terms are explained throughout and jargon is avoided. Introduction to Phenomenology will be of interest to all students seeking a reliable introduction to a key movement in European thought.

Edmund Husserl Bibliography

Edited by John Sallis, Thomas M. Seebohm and Hugh J. Silverman. Duquesne university press, Pittsburgh ... Foundations of morality, human rights and the human sciences. Phenomenology in a foundational dialogue with the human sciences.

Edmund Husserl Bibliography

This bibliography contains the publications of Husserl and the main secondary literature on Husserl, from Husserl's earliest publication (1887) till today (1997). As the collection of material was conduded in lune 1997, the list of publications for the year 1997 is of course incomplete. In this bibliography publications in the following languages have been induded: German, English, French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese and Dutch - for both primary and secondary literature. Since this bibliography has been based primarily on the consultation of the induded documents (and not restricted to copying already existing bibliographies), it was not possible to indude publications in languages other than those mentioned. The bibliography has been constructed in the following way: 1. The list of Husserl's works and secondary literature by individual authors is preceded by a list of all edited volumes in which a text by or on Husserl is published. This list is ordered chronologica11y and runs from 1921 ti11 1997 (inclusive). Edited volumes of the same year are classified according to language, and this in the order mentioned above: German, English, French, etc. Edited volumes with a title in more than one language are classified according to the above order of languages (this of course concerns only the title of the edited volume, not the title(s) of the individual contributions). This order is maintained throughout the other parts of the bibliography.

Portraits of American Continental Philosophers

Human Studies : A Journal for Philosophy and the Social Sciences 1 : 1-15 . 1979a “ Dasein's Analysis and ... 1983a “ The Foundations of Morality and the Human Sciences . ... 1984a Kant and Phenomenology , ed . with Thomas M. Seebohm .

Portraits of American Continental Philosophers

Taken together, these intimate self-portraits provide a vibrant overview of the multiplicity and depth of continental philosophy in America."--Jacket.