Through Some Eventful Years

Through Some Eventful Years


Confederate Daughters

Sarah Lois Wadley Diary, August 31, October 26, 1860; Eppes, Through Some Eventful Years, 86–87, 125. 7. Paul Finkelman, ed., His Soul Goes Marching On: Responses toJohn Brown and the Harper's Ferry Raid (Charlottesville: University ...

Confederate Daughters

Confederate Daughters: Coming of Age during the Civil War explores gender, age, and Confederate identity by examining the lives of teenage daughters of Southern slaveholding, secessionist families. These young women clung tenaciously to the gender ideals that upheld marriage and motherhood as the fulfillment of female duty and to the racial order of the slaveholding South, an institution that defined their status and afforded them material privileges. Author Victoria E. Ott discusses how the loyalty of young Southern women to the fledgling nation, born out of a conservative movement to preserve the status quo, brought them into new areas of work, new types of civic activism, and new rituals of courtship during the Civil War. Social norms for daughters of the elite, their preparation for their roles as Southern women, and their material and emotional connections to the slaveholding class changed drastically during the Civil War. When differences between the North and South proved irreconcilable, Southern daughters demonstrated extraordinary agency in seeking to protect their futures as wives, mothers, and slaveholders. From a position of young womanhood and privilege, they threw their support behind the movement to create a Confederate identity, which was in turn shaped by their participation in the secession movement and the war effort. Their political engagement is evident from their knowledge of military battles, and was expressed through their clothing, social activities, relationships with peers, and interactions with Union soldiers. Confederate Daughters also reveals how these young women, in an effort to sustain their families throughout the war, adjusted to new domestic duties, confronting the loss of slaves and other financial hardships by seeking paid work outside their homes. Drawing on their personal and published recollections of the war, slavery, and the Old South, Ott argues that young women created a unique female identity different from that of older Southern women, the Confederate bellehood. This transformative female identity was an important aspect of the Lost Cause mythology—the version of the conflict that focused on Southern nationalism—and bridged the cultural gap between the antebellum and postbellum periods. Augmented by twelve illustrations, this book offers a generational understanding of the transitional nature of wartime and its effects on women’s self-perceptions. Confederate Daughters identifies the experiences of these teenage daughters as making a significant contribution to the new woman in the New South.

Blockaders Refugees and Contrabands

3. Eppes, Through Some Eventful Years, 222. 4. USS Stars & Stripes's log, 18 November 8, 10, 11, 22, 23 December 1863, 15 January 1864. 5, OR, Ser. I, vol. 53, pp. 318–19. 6. Harmony to Bailey, 9 February 1864, enclosure in Woodbury to ...

Blockaders  Refugees  and Contrabands

Blockaders, Refugees, and Contrabands chronicles the role of the East Gulf Blockading Squadron as an important Federal contingent in Florida.

Scarlett s Sisters

An exception to the frenzy of Confederate nationalism was Frances Peter, a Unionist in Lexington, Kentucky. See Smith and Cooper, eds., ... See also Eppes, Through Some Eventful Years, 125, 154. East, ed., Sarah Morgan, 64-65, 67; ...

Scarlett s Sisters

Scarlett's Sisters: Young Women in the Old South

Tallahassee

Eight THROUGH SOME EVENTFUL YEARS TALLAHASSEE PHOTOGRAPHER ALVAN HARPER ON ASSIGNMENT , C. 1900–1910 . Mr. Harper deserves great credit for documenting many of early Tallahassee's people , places , and events .

Tallahassee

Located in the rolling hills of Florida's Panhandle, Tallahassee has long stood as a capital city. It has been home to prehistoric Native Americans, who built the Lake Jackson Mounds in the 13th century; the Apalachee Indians, who learned to live with the Spanish Mission in the 17th century; and to European settlers and the American residents of today. Tallahassee's tree-lined, canopied roads and bountiful dogwoods and azaleas have always been associated with the leadership and history of the state. The presence of institutions such as Florida State University and Florida A&M have also made Tallahassee an attractive center of higher learning and diversity.Throughout prosperity and adversity, both Tallahassee's population and complexity have continued to increase. Combining historic landmarks, such as the San Luis Archaeological Site and the Old City, and new neighborhoods, such as Frenchtown and Lafayette Park, the capital city is a unique representation of Florida, from its days as a territory to its status as one of the country's most visited states.

J J Dickison

14Susan Bradford Eppes, Through Some Eventful Years, Gainesville, University of Florida Press, 1968, Facsimile Reprint of the 1926 Edition. 15Samuel Proctor, "Florida a Hundred Years Ago," March 9, 1861. 16Marjory Stoneman Douglas ...

J J  Dickison

Dickison fought during the Civil War in Florida, which was basically told to fend for itself. Using geurilla combat and skirmishing, his band of soldiers became the only people to blow up a gunship from land during the Civil War.

Atalanta Winnie and Other Poems

With the tales and poetry which hang about and cleave to old castles , Mr. Brent , who is a well - known ... form a history of thoughts and feelings through some eventful years ; among the most noticeable are two devoted to the cause of ...

Atalanta  Winnie  and Other Poems


African American Religious Thought

See also Susan Bradford Eppes for similar occurrences in Florida , Through Some Eventful Years ( [ 1926 ) reprint ed . , Gainesville : University of Florida Press , 1968 ) . 24. Richmond Dispatch , August 1 , 2 , 1867 ; New York Times ...

African American Religious Thought

Believing that African American religious studies has reached a crossroads, Cornel West and Eddie Glaude seek, in this landmark anthology, to steer the discipline into the future. Arguing that the complexity of beliefs, choices, and actions of African Americans need not be reduced to expressions of black religion, West and Glaude call for more careful reflection on the complex relationships of African American religious studies to conceptions of class, gender, sexual orientation, race, empire, and other values that continue to challenge our democratic ideals.

Authenticity in North America

13) published Through Some Eventful Years, an account of her upbringing in antebellum Leon County and the Florida cotton belt, a perspective shaped in the decades that followed the events the memoir attempts to explain.

Authenticity in North America

This interdisciplinary book addresses the highly relevant debates about authenticity in North America, providing a contemporary re-examination of American culture, tourism and commodification of place. Blending social sciences and humanities research skills, it formulates an examination of the geography of authenticity in North America, and brings together studies of both rurality and urbanity across the country, exposing the many commonalities of these different landscapes. Relph stated that nostalgic places are inauthentic, yet within this work several chapters explore how festivals and visitor attractions, which cultivate place heritage appeal, are authenticated by tourists and communities, creating a shared sense of belonging. In a world of hyperreal simulacra, post-truth and fake news, this book bucks the trend by demonstrating that authenticity can be found everywhere: in a mouthful of food, in a few bars of a Beach Boys song, in a statue of a troll, in a diffuse magical atmosphere, in the weirdness of the ungentrified streets. Written by a range of leading experts, this book offers a contemporary view of American authenticity, tourism, identity and culture. It will be of great interest to upper-level students, researchers and academics in Tourism, Geography, History, Cultural Studies, American Studies and Film Studies.

Fredericksburg Fredericksburg

With the Wandering Regiment: The Diary of Captain Ralph Ely of the Eighth Michigan Infantry. Edited by George M. Blackburn. Mount Pleasant: Central Michigan University Press, 1965. Eppes, Susan Bradford. Through Some Eventful Years.

Fredericksburg  Fredericksburg

During the battle of Gettysburg, as Union troops along Cemetery Ridge rebuffed Pickett's Charge, they were heard to shout, "Give them Fredericksburg!" Their cries reverberated from a clash that, although fought some six months earlier, clearly loomed large in the minds of Civil War soldiers. Fought on December 13, 1862, the battle of Fredericksburg ended in a stunning defeat for the Union. Confederate general Robert E. Lee suffered roughly 5,000 casualties but inflicted more than twice that many losses--nearly 13,000--on his opponent, General Ambrose Burnside. As news of the Union loss traveled north, it spread a wave of public despair that extended all the way to President Lincoln. In the beleaguered Confederacy, the southern victory bolstered flagging hopes, as Lee and his men began to take on an aura of invincibility. George Rable offers a gripping account of the battle of Fredericksburg and places the campaign within its broader political, social, and military context. Blending battlefield and home front history, he not only addresses questions of strategy and tactics but also explores material conditions in camp, the rhythms and disruptions of military life, and the enduring effects of the carnage on survivors--both civilian and military--on both sides.

Village Bells

... though not arranged in chronological order , form a history of thoughts and feelings through some eventful years ; among the most noticeable are two devoted to the cause of Poland , which formed part of a small work , offered some ...

Village Bells


The Children s Civil War

Reminiscences of Early Days in Iowa . Toledo , Iowa : Toledo Chronicle ... Eddy , T. M. The Patriotism of Illinois : A Record of the Civil and Military History of the State in the War for the Union . ... Through Some Eventful Years .

The Children s Civil War

The Children's Civil War is an exploration of childhood during our nation's greatest crisis. James Marten describes how the war changed the literature and schoolbooks published for children, how it affected children's relationships with absent fathers and brothers, how the responsibilities forced on northern and especially southern youngsters shortened their childhoods, and how the death and destruction that tore the country apart often cut down children as well as adults.

Women Transforming Politics

political activism in the post - Civil War era is drawn from Elsa Barkley Brown , " To Catch the Vision of Freedom ... See a^so Susan Bradford Eppes for similar occurrences in Florida , Through Some Eventful Years ( 1926 ; reprint ...

Women Transforming Politics

Contains over thirty essays which explore the complex contexts of political engagement--family and intimate relationships, friendships, neighborhood, community, work environment, race, religious, and other cultural groupings--that structure perceptions of women's opportunities for political participation.

Ghosts of the Confederacy

Some southerners went to extremes to minimize the sense of dishonor or betrayal. ... on the picture, Jefferson Davis to A. Dudley Mann, 19 April 1869, Davis Papers, UAL; on the cartoon incident, Eppes, Through Some Eventful Years, p.

Ghosts of the Confederacy

After Lee and Grant met at Appomatox Court House in 1865 to sign the document ending the long and bloody Civil War, the South at last had to face defeat as the dream of a Confederate nation melted into the Lost Cause. Through an examination of memoirs, personal papers, and postwar Confederate rituals such as memorial day observances, monument unveilings, and veterans' reunions, Ghosts of the Confederacy probes into how white southerners adjusted to and interpreted their defeat and explores the cultural implications of a central event in American history. Foster argues that, contrary to southern folklore, southerners actually accepted their loss, rapidly embraced both reunion and a New South, and helped to foster sectional reconciliation and an emerging social order. He traces southerners' fascination with the Lost Cause--showing that it was rooted as much in social tensions resulting from rapid change as it was in the legacy of defeat--and demonstrates that the public celebration of the war helped to make the South a deferential and conservative society. Although the ghosts of the Confederacy still haunted the New South, Foster concludes that they did little to shape behavior in it--white southerners, in celebrating the war, ultimately trivialized its memory, reduced its cultural power, and failed to derive any special wisdom from defeat.

Music and the Southern Belle

Two Years, or The Way WeLived Then. In Two Novels by Mary Chesnut, edited by Elisabeth Muhlenfeld. ... Clay, ofAlabama, Covering Social and PoliticalLife in Washington and the South, 1853–66. ... Through Some Eventful Years.

Music and the Southern Belle

Candace Bailey’s exploration of the intertwining worlds of music and gender shows how young southern women pushed the boundaries of respectability to leave their unique mark on a patriarchal society. Before 1861, a strictly defined code of behavior allowed a southern woman to identify herself as a “lady” through her accomplishments in music, drawing, and writing, among other factors. Music permeated the lives of southern women, and they learned appropriate participation through instruction at home and at female training institutions. A belle’s primary venue was the parlor, where she could demonstrate her usefulness in the domestic circle by providing comfort and serving to enhance social gatherings through her musical performances, often by playing the piano or singing. The southern lady performed in public only on the rarest of occasions, though she might attend public performances by women. An especially talented lady who composed music for a broader audience would do so anonymously so that her reputation would remain unsullied. The tumultuous Civil War years provided an opportunity for southern women to envision and attempt new ways to make themselves useful to the broader, public society. While continuing their domestic responsibilities and taking on new ones, young women also tested the boundaries of propriety in a variety of ways. In a broad break with the past, musical ladies began giving public performances to raise money for the war effort, some women published patriotic Confederate music under their own names, supporting their cause and claiming public ownership for their creations. Bailey explores these women’s lives and analyzes their music. Through their move from private to public performance and publication, southern ladies not only expanded concepts of social acceptability but also gained a valued sense of purpose. Music and the Southern Belle places these remarkable women in their social context, providing compelling insight into southern culture and the intricate ties between a lady’s identity and the world of music. Augmented by incisive analysis of musical compositions and vibrant profiles of composers, this volume is the first of its kind, making it an essential read for devotees of Civil War and southern history, gender studies, and music.

Siblings

Through Some Eventful Years. Macon, GA: J. W. Burke, 1926. Eve, Sarah. “Extracts from the Journal of Miss Sarah Eve: Written While Living Near the City of Philadelphia in 1772–73.” Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 5.1 ...

Siblings

Brothers and sisters are so much a part of our lives that we can overlook their importance. Even scholars of the family tend to forget siblings, focusing instead on marriage and parent-child relations. Based on a wealth of family papers, period images, and popular literature, this is the first book devoted to the broad history of sibling relations, spanning the long period of transition from early to modern America. Illuminating the evolution of the modern family system, Siblings shows how brothers and sisters have helped each other in the face of the dramatic political, economic, and cultural changes of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The book reveals that, in colonial America, sibling relations offered an egalitarian space to soften the challenges of the larger patriarchal family and society, while after the Revolution, in antebellum America, sibling relations provided order and authority in a more democratic nation. Moreover, Hemphill explains that siblings serve as the bridge between generations. Brothers and sisters grow up in a shared family culture influenced by their parents, but they are different from their parents in being part of the next generation. Responding to new economic and political conditions, they form and influence their own families, but their continuing relationships with brothers and sisters serve as a link to the past. Siblings thus experience and promote the new, but share the comforting context of the old. Indeed, in all races, siblings function as humanity's shock-absorbers, as well as valued kin and keepers of memory. This wide-ranging book offers a new understanding of the relationship between families and history in an evolving world. It is also a timely reminder of the role our siblings play in our own lives.

Warrior at Heart

The Confederate Soldier in the Civil War, 1861–1865; Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, 84. ... October 11, 1861; Susan Bradford Eppes, Through Some Eventful Years (Gainesville: University of Florida Press, 1926), 151–52. 59.

Warrior at Heart

John Milton-a true son of the South- endeavored to find ways in which to keep Florida relevant to the Confederate cause. Under Milton, Florida was a key contributor of supplies for the Confederate Army. supplies. By pledging men, beef, and salt among other supplies, Milton gave credence to Florida's war effort. However, poor strategizing, blockades, and lack of military might led to several failed attempts to overcome the Union armies infiltrating the Florida coast. Left to defend themselves from the enemy with little help from their Confederate compatriots, Floridians grew increasingly disenchanted with their government's dismissive attitude. Over the course of the war, they were caught between survival and secession. With little resources remaining, survival was the only way for the state to maintain itself. Left disillusioned, the embattled Milton took matters into his own hands, refusing to submit to the impending surrender secession and the ignominy of defeat. Warrior at Heart is an in-depth study of Florida's Southern history during the Civil War. Historian John Adams gives detailed analyses of not only the economic dynamics reasons for the South to wage war, but also the events that shaped John Milton's role in the war effort....

War Stuff

The Struggle for Human and Environmental Resources in the American Civil War Joan E. Cashin ... Through Some Eventful Years. With an Introduction and Index by Joseph D. Cushman, Jr. Gainesville, FL: University ...

War Stuff

In this path-breaking work on the American Civil War, Joan E. Cashin explores the struggle between armies and civilians over the human and material resources necessary to wage war. This war 'stuff' included the skills of white Southern civilians, as well as such material resources as food, timber, and housing. At first, civilians were willing to help Confederate or Union forces, but the war took such a toll that all civilians, regardless of politics, began focusing on their own survival. Both armies took whatever they needed from human beings and the material world, which eventually destroyed the region's ability to wage war. In this fierce contest between civilians and armies, the civilian population lost. Cashin draws on a wide range of documents, as well as the perspectives of environmental history and material culture studies. This book provides an entirely new perspective on the war era.