To Know as We Are Known

Moving beyond the bankruptcy of our current model of education, Parker Palmer finds the soul of education through a lifelong cultivation of the wisdom each of us possesses and can share to benefit others.

To Know as We Are Known

This primer on authentic education explores how mind and heart can work together in the learning process. Moving beyond the bankruptcy of our current model of education, Parker Palmer finds the soul of education through a lifelong cultivation of the wisdom each of us possesses and can share to benefit others.

To Know as I Am Known The Communion of the Saints and the Ontology of Love

Once we deny ourselves, however, we can gain access to God—we can be “in
God”—and hence we become aware of the other in a deeper, fuller way, as
Eckert indicates. Here Paul's teaching that in heaven we shall know as we are
known ...

To Know as I Am Known  The Communion of the Saints and the Ontology of Love

The doctrine of the communion of the saints is central in the spiritual lives and theology of millions of Christians. However, it has been neglected by much recent philosophical scholarship. ‘To know as I am known’ addresses this oversight by offering a contemporary analysis of this venerated doctrine. By taking two related puzzles inherent in the doctrine itself, McLeod-Harrison explores and reflects on not only the communion of the saints but also on the ontology of love. Divided into five parts, this book provides an account of human nature and sin, before suggesting a way of thinking of love that is rooted both in the doctrine of the Trinity and in the thought of several contemporary analytic thinkers along with Dostoyevsky, Eckerd, Royce. While the integral issues of the doctrine are related to the “why-be-moral” problem, McLeod-Harrison shows that the challenges of the doctrine arise from the unique nature of agape (divine love). Thus, the communion of the saints comes through the challenges intact with a plausible interpretation of saintly motivation and human solidarity. Born out of 20 years of thought, this essential and sophisticated reflection serves as an important contribution to the field of the philosophy of religion that will inspire and engage students, scholars, and Christians, alike.

How Youth Ministry Can Change Theological Education If We Let It

Teenagers need such communities in order to bloom into who they already are in
Christ, and it is urgent that we make ... In To Know as We Are Known, educator
Parker Palmer writes, “In Christian tradition, truth is not a concept that works, but ...

How Youth Ministry Can Change Theological Education   If We Let It

Since 1993, forty-nine theological seminaries have created opportunities for high school students to participate in on-campus High School Theology Programs (HSTPs) that invite them to engage in serious biblical and theological study. Many of the young people who take part in these programs go on to become pastoral or lay leaders in their churches. What has made these programs so successful -- especially given the well-documented "crisis of faith" among young people today? In this book thirteen contributors -- many of whom have created or led one of these innovative theology programs -- investigate answers to this question. They examine the pedagogical practices the HSTPs have in common and explore how they are contributing to the leadership of the church. They then show how the lessons gleaned from these successful programs can help churches, denominations, and seminaries reimagine both theological education and youth ministry.

The Motif of Hospitality in Theological Education

It is in Palmer's third book To Know as We Are Known that hospitality is discussed
in relation to education. ... 155 Thus, Palmer called for a recovery of
connectedness and community in education as an alternative to the prevailing
tendency in ...

The Motif of Hospitality in Theological Education

These are exciting times in theological education as old models are being reassessed and teachers and schools are looking for guidance on how best to do the job and how to profitably relate to students in the ministry of teaching. Increasingly, the motif of hospitality is being used to guide our thinking and practice, but it needs a careful assessment if it is to be of maximum use to theological education today. This book provides an integrated biblical, theological, and educational rationale to inform theological educators of the place of hospitality in enhancing their quest to create more effective learning environments for the holistic formation of students. Dr Davina Soh explores key elements of hospitality such as inclusion, presence, care, and reciprocity, which when combined, can deliver the best possible educational experience for theological students and transform an entire institution.

Knowing as We Are Known

All those years while I was trying to create an identity that would satisfy my need
to be respected, and to relieve my fear ofrejection, God was speaking and calling
to me as God's child. God knows this child, but does not know the false illusion ...

Knowing as We Are Known

Immerse yourself in that still place within, in which God speaks to the true self that you have been created to be. This book is more than simply information about inner stillness; it is a guide into the experience of inner stillness itself. This is the authors journey to that place where God speaks to our spirits and calls us children. This is a call not so much to do something as much as it is a call to be who God created us to be. Through the experiences of contemplation, waiting, hope, and assurance, it is the goal of this writing that you will find rest for your soul, body, and mind in a fresh, new, and enduring way. We all long to live from the center of an authentic self. Gene Yotka has provided an important resource for helping us identify and express a spiritual life from that center. His book is a gift. -Dr. Steve Harper, Professor of Spiritual Formation, Asbury Theological Seminary Gene has demystified contemplative prayer and made it accessible to the average believer. -Dr. Stephen Seamands, Professor of Christian Doctrine, Asbury Theological Seminary

A Glimpse of the Kingdom in Academia

Nothing could possibly be known by the solitary self, since the self is inherently
communal in nature. In order to know something, we depend on the consensus of
the community in which we are rooted—a consensus so deep that we often draw
 ...

A Glimpse of the Kingdom in Academia

University is a major way that our society prepares professionals and leaders in education, health, government, business, arts, church--all components of our communal lives. Although the beginnings of the first universities were Christian, academia has become more and more adrift from these foundations. We have lost not only the union, the interwovenness of theological and academic understandings, but also the relational and communal process of learning which teaches students to be other-centered in their practice. A Glimpse of the Kingdom in Academia tells the story of the social sciences department of a small Christian university that took seriously the mandate to prepare their students to be salt and light in a secular society. Here are stories of the transformation in students' lives, as well as description of classroom practices, and the epistemological theory behind those practices. The book explores academic knowing, Christian worldview, relational epistemology, inner knowing, and wisdom--all ways of knowing that a Christian university should teach. The process of transformation, the context of community, and the bigger picture of life's journey and changing images of God are identified as important aspects of kingdom life in academia. The institutional setting is also critiqued with the recognition that power practices need to align with the kingdom of the Christ who emptied himself.

The Methodist Quarterly Review

God can only think that which is real; and therefore to be truly in the divine
contemplation, as something cared for, (which Christ affirms of the dead
patriarchs) this is to be still an entity; it is still “a living unto him. ... “To know as we
are known ...

The Methodist Quarterly Review


Ella V

“We shall know as we are known.” “We shall see him as he is.' And then the
whole Scripture account of the. worship,. praise and adoration, which a saved
spirit is described as rendering unto God and to the Lamb, necessarily supposes
that ...

Ella V


The True Latter Day Saints Herald

in the future , when we would not have opposition everywhere , until finally they
to look through a glass darkly , but face put ... True , many believed and we would
be able to know as we are Paul ' s preaching , and obeyed the gospel known .

The True Latter Day Saints  Herald


Principles and Practices of Christian Education

It also suggests that the teacher is able to identify intentions either explicitly or
implicitly when questioned. "To help ... Coleman's activist understanding of
teaching is balanced by Parker I. Palmer, in To Know as We Are Known. He
defines ...

Principles and Practices of Christian Education

Principles and Practices of Christian Education shows teachers how they can use two important principles that stand behind all evangelical practices to make their education program stand out from all the others in its nurture of students. First, evangelical Christian education recognizes the need for conversion-personal and corporate transformation that reconnects people to their Creator. Second, evangelical Christian education strives for connection-making contact with people as unique individuals who live in a particular society and who need to know more about scripture. In this book Christian education students learn that the work for which they prepare is a partnership with God to transform people. Their central task is worship, but through it and other activities they lead others to faith, commitment, and transformation of communities.