Separated by Their Sex

... was To the Right Honourable, the Ladies Ordinary and Extraordinary, assembled in Parliament, now sitting in Spring Garden ([London: no pub.,] 1647).

Separated by Their Sex

In Separated by Their Sex, Mary Beth Norton offers a bold genealogy that shows how gender came to determine the right of access to the Anglo-American public sphere by the middle of the eighteenth century. Earlier, high-status men and women alike had been recognized as appropriate political actors, as exemplified during and after Bacon’s Rebellion by the actions of—and reactions to—Lady Frances Berkeley, wife of Virginia’s governor. By contrast, when the first ordinary English women to claim a political voice directed group petitions to Parliament during the Civil War of the 1640s, men relentlessly criticized and parodied their efforts. Even so, as late as 1690, Anglo-American women’s political interests and opinions were publicly acknowledged. Norton traces the profound shift in attitudes toward women’s participation in public affairs to the age’s cultural arbiters, including John Dunton, editor of the Athenian Mercury, a popular 1690s periodical that promoted women’s links to husband, family, and household. Fittingly, Dunton was the first author known to apply the word "private" to women and their domestic lives. Subsequently, the immensely influential authors Richard Steele and Joseph Addison (in the Tatler and the Spectator) advanced the notion that women’s participation in politics—even in political dialogues—was absurd. They and many imitators on both sides of the Atlantic argued that women should confine themselves to home and family, a position that American women themselves had adopted by the 1760s. Colonial women incorporated the novel ideas into their self-conceptions; during such "private" activities as sitting around a table drinking tea, they worked to define their own lives. On the cusp of the American Revolution, Norton concludes, a newly gendered public-private division was firmly in place.

Democracy and Anti Democracy in Early Modern England 1603 1689

... 'the GREAT 23 24 25 To the Right Honourable the Ladies ordinary and extraordinary, assembled in parliament, now sitting in Spring Garden (1647).

Democracy and Anti Democracy in Early Modern England 1603   1689

This volume offers a new and cross-disciplinary approach to the study of democratic ideas and practices in early modern England.

John Bull

VOLBURN'S NE W and brilliant audiences ever assembled in this Theatre , in the ... by Suum Cuique , Esq.- The Pilgrim's Dream - A Word for The Right Hon .

John Bull


Supplement to the Courant

Aspinwall , lady and daughter ; Mr. and Mrs. Ous ordinary currant wine . ... Mr. Fay . lady and two Misses Fay of Salem , Mass .; spring or autuan ...

Supplement to the Courant


Harper s Weekly

Lady Inglis has had the honor of personally relating to her Majesty the ... he made a long speech , which certainly possesses more than usual interest at ...

Harper s Weekly


The Illustrated London News

313 2 logg WS Lade + 1 Arianna NIE SIT L E ED S. 2 LAULT MA ... roses , asters - both tasselled and quilled - were exceedingly Right Hon .

The Illustrated London News


Kulturerbe und Denkmalpflege transkulturell

Seit Ende des europäischen Kolonialprojekts und mit den aktuellen Auswirkungen der Globalisierung ist die eurozentrische und nationalstaatlich orientierte Konzeption von "Kulturerbe" in eine konfliktgeladene Schieflage geraten, die auch ...

Kulturerbe und Denkmalpflege transkulturell