Totalitaria

What If the Enemy Is the State?

Totalitaria

"Never before in human history have governments had the power to totally control your life. Today, they do. That sort of power does strange things to human ambition. Even with the best of intentions, Lord Acton famously noted, absolute power tends to corrupt absolutely. Hard-won freedoms are being chiselled away every day, as a global bureaucracy springs up in partnership with global businesses, globally-focused politicians and global lobby groups, to impose a new global system of rules and expectations. New technology has not only made the globe a village, it's made governing that village a piece of cake in comparison with earlier civilisations. From population control to gun control, food regulations to clampdowns on natural health, Agenda 21 to climate change, mercury-filled lightbulbs to the Green Police, global treaties signed behind closed doors at the behest of unelected bureaucrats are rapidly locking in changes and a framework for the bureaucracy to take global control. In Totalitaria, bestselling author and investigative journalist Ian Wishart exposes a high stakes strategy of divide and rule, of 'manufactured' crises and instant solutions. He lays bare, in their own words, a cynical agenda to create a world where those with power and influence do well. It doesn't matter whether you call it capitalism with a social conscience, or socialism with a market face - to all intents and purposes its an iron fist in an ever so velvet glove"--From publisher.

The rape of the mind

the psychology of thought control, menticide, and brainwashing

The rape of the mind

Study of the methods by which systematic mental pressure brings people to abject submission.

New Political Ideas in the Aftermath of the Great War

New Political Ideas in the Aftermath of the Great War

This edited collection presents new research on how the Great War and its aftermath shaped political thought in the interwar period across Europe. Assessing the major players of the war as well as more peripheral cases, the contributors challenge previous interpretations of the relationship between veterans and fascism, and provide new perspectives on how veterans tried to promote a new political and social order. Those who had frontline experience of the First World War committed themselves to constructing a new political and social order in war-torn Europe, shaped by their experience of the war and its aftermath. A number of them gave voice to the need for a world order free from political and social conflict, and all over Europe veterans imagined a third way between capitalist liberalism and state-controlled socialism. By doing so, many of them moved towards emerging fascist movements and became, in some case unwillingly, the heralds of totalitarian dictatorships.

Political Philosophy

A Beginners' Guide for Students and Politicians

Political Philosophy

Politicians invoke grand ideas: social justice, democracy, community, liberty, equality. But what do these ideas really mean? How can politicians across the political spectrum appeal to the same values? This fourth edition of Adam Swift's highly readable introduction to political philosophy answers these important questions, and includes new material on issues such as nationalism, immigration and multiculturalism, as well as updated guides to further reading. This lively and accessible book is ideal for students, but it also brings the insights of the world's leading political philosophers to a wide general audience. Using plenty of examples, it equips readers to think for themselves about the ideas that shape political life. Democracy works best when both politicians and voters move beyond rhetoric to think clearly and carefully about the values and principles that should govern their society. But clear thinking is difficult in an age when established orthodoxies have fallen by the wayside and political debate is becoming increasingly tribal and raucous. Bringing political philosophy out of the ivory tower and within the reach of all, this book provides us with tools to cut through the complexities and penetrate the smokescreens of modern politics. In so doing, it makes a valuable contribution to the democratic process and this new edition will continue to be essential reading for students of political philosophy and theory.

A Companion to Isidore of Seville

A Companion to Isidore of Seville

A standard work in nineteen chapters from leading international scholars on bishop Isidore of Seville (d. 636), addressing the contexts in which the seventh-century bishop lived and worked, exploring his key works and activities, and finally considering his later reception.

Catholicism and Fascism in Europe 1918 - 1945

Catholicism and Fascism in Europe 1918 - 1945

Die im vorliegenden Band versammelten Aufsätze analysieren die vielfältige Art und Weise, wie der Vatikan, die nationalen Kirchen und einzelne Katholiken mit dem Aufstieg der extremen Rechten in Europa während der 1920er, 1930er und frühen 1940er Jahre umgingen, vom Ende des Ersten Weltkriegs, der mit Recht als einer der wichtigsten Katalysatoren des europäischen Faschismus in der Zwischenkriegszeit gilt, bis zum Schluss und zu den unmittelbaren Nachwirkungen des Zweiten Weltkriegs. Während einige Aufsätze sich auf theoretische, methodologische Probleme konzentrieren, beschäftigen sich die meisten Beiträge mit jeweils einem Land oder einer Region, wo eine faschistische Bewegung oder ein solches Regime zwischen den Kriegen und während des Zweiten Weltkriegs erfolgreich war, und wo es gleichzeitig eine signifikante katholische Präsenz in der Gesellschaft gab. Fast ganz Europa wird behandelt – ein beispielloses Unternehmen - , und eine große Zahl wichtiger Kontexte und Methoden wird untersucht. So wirken die Beiträge mit an der allgemeinen Entwicklung eines interpretativen ‚Cluster‘-Modells, das eine Reihe von Grundmustern der Forschung vereinigt und zukünftige Untersuchungen anregen wird. The papers presented in this volume analyse the many ways in which the Vatican, national Churches and individual catholics dealt with the rise of the extreme right in Europe throughout the 1920s, 1930s and early 1940s, from the end of the First World War, arguably one of the main catalysts of European interwar fascism, to the conclusion and immediate aftermath of the Second World War. While a number of papers focus primarily on theoretical, methodological issues pertaining to the book’s general theme, the majority of papers focus on either a country or region where a fascist movement or regime flourished between the wars and during the Second World War, and where there was a significant catholic presence in society. The various chapters cover almost the entire European continent – an endeavour that is unprecedented –, and they explore a wide range of relevant contexts and methodologies, thus further contributing to the general development of an interpretive ‘cluster’ model that incorporates a series of investigative matrixes, and that will hopefully inspire future research.

Semiotik des Erzählens

Studien z. satir. Roman d. 20. Jahrhunderts

Semiotik des Erzählens


Dictators, Democracy, and American Public Culture

Envisioning the Totalitarian Enemy, 1920s-1950s

Dictators, Democracy, and American Public Culture

Focusing on portrayals of Mussolini's Italy, Hitler's Germany, and Stalin's Russia in U.S. films, magazine and newspaper articles, books, plays, speeches, and other texts, Benjamin Alpers traces changing American understandings of dictatorship from the late 1920s through the early years of the Cold War. During the early 1930s, most Americans' conception of dictatorship focused on the dictator. Whether viewed as heroic or horrific, the dictator was represented as a figure of great, masculine power and effectiveness. As the Great Depression gripped the United States, a few people--including conservative members of the press and some Hollywood filmmakers--even dared to suggest that dictatorship might be the answer to America's social problems. In the late 1930s, American explanations of dictatorship shifted focus from individual leaders to the movements that empowered them. Totalitarianism became the image against which a view of democracy emphasizing tolerance and pluralism and disparaging mass movements developed. First used to describe dictatorships of both right and left, the term "totalitarianism" fell out of use upon the U.S. entry into World War II. With the war's end and the collapse of the U.S.-Soviet alliance, however, concerns about totalitarianism lay the foundation for the emerging Cold War.