Tracking the Chili Line Railroad to Santa Fe

The Chili Line received its unique nickname from the chili peppers which farmers along the route would string on lines to dry. This book celebrates the history of the railroad, as well as people and places along the line.

Tracking the Chili Line Railroad to Santa Fe

The Chili Line was the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad's narrow gauge route from Antonito, Colorado, to Santa Fe, New Mexico. It operated along its 125-mile route from 1880 to 1941. The Chili Line received its unique nickname from the chili peppers which farmers along the route would string on lines to dry. This book celebrates the history of the railroad, as well as people and places along the line. The Chili Line passed through Hispanic villages and Indian Pueblos, and its effect upon them is noted. Travelers today can still find traces of the Chili Line in existence, such as railroad depots in Antonito, Embudo, and Santa Fe. Water tanks can be seen in Tres Piedras and Embudo. Roadbed for the tracks may still be seen along the Rio Grande. Historic photos of railroad operations at these places are included in the book, as well as contemporary photos showing the same sites today. Maps are included to allow readers to track the Chili Line's route. The Chili Line Railroad to Santa Fe takes readers along the route of a long-abandoned rail line, but one still very much alive in the hearts of rail fans and history lovers today.

Carson National Forest N F Ojo Caliente Proposed Transmission Line

The tracks and ties were removed by the DRGW in 1941 following permission given to abandon the rail line from Antonito , Colorado to Santa Fe , New Mexico . Permission to abandon the line was effective September 1 , 1941 ( Gjevre 1984 ) ...

Carson National Forest  N F    Ojo Caliente Proposed Transmission Line


The Train Stops Here

The railroad was called the Chile Line for the chile ristras , strings of red New Mexico peppers , that decorated the portales of the adobe houses along the route . Santa Fe in the 1880s had dirt streets and a picket fence surrounding ...

The Train Stops Here

In the vast expanse of territorial New Mexico, railroads had a striking impact. Many cities, among them Carlsbad, Raton, Clovis, and Gallup, were founded as railroad stops. Architect Marci Riskin explores the history of railroad depots and other structures--everything but the trains themselves--that make up New Mexico's railway legacy. To begin the examination, Riskin includes a brief history of railroad development in New Mexico, a description of the architectural features of the state's railroad buildings, and an overview of how railroads work. This background will help answer questions that may arise on a visit to a rail-yard: What is that strangely shaped train car carrying? How is that twisted piece of metal used? Why are the bricks on the platform stamped with the single word Coffeyville? The bulk of the book is an account of what is left of the state's railroad heritage, organized geographically within each rail system: the Santa Fe system from Raton to Silver City, the Denver & Rio Grande, the Colorado & Southern, the Southern Pacific, and the El Paso and Northeastern, among others.

Tracking the Narrow Gauge from Chama to Durango

With maps and historic and contemporary photographs, this book points the way to rediscovering this lost trackage.

Tracking the Narrow Gauge from Chama to Durango

In the late 1800s, Denver and Rio Grande Railroad founder William Jackson Palmer had a dream of building a railroad from Denver south to Mexico City. While his dream ended at Santa Fe, New Mexico, greater profits were realized by extending his narrow-gauge railroad west across Colorado and New Mexico to Durango and the mines at Silverton. Rocky Mountain railfans and history buffs have long been familiar with the two remaining segments of the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad's narrow-gauge route: the Durango and Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad, and the Cumbres and Toltec Scenic Railroad. These two railroads carry thousands of tourists every year. But what about the 111 miles between the two? What happened to the segment between Chama and Durango? Long since abandoned, travelers today can track this route along the highways and back roads of Northern New Mexico and Southern Colorado. With maps and historic and contemporary photographs, this book points the way to rediscovering this lost trackage. Branch lines, including logging railroads and the Farmington Branch, are also included, so the traveler has a complete guide to finding this long-gone section of the narrow-gauge railroad.

Nina Otero Warren of Santa Fe

... $33.40 from Mamie) and made a homestead application for land which was at that time just north of the "Chili Line," the Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad's narrow-gauge track running from Santa Fe to Buckman Station on the Rio ...

Nina Otero Warren of Santa Fe

In many ways Nina Otero-Warren's life paralleled that of Santa Fe and New Mexico in the early years of the 20th century. Born in 1881, she saw New Mexico change from a mostly rural territory to become the 47th state in 1912 with increasing Anglo immigrant influences.

Espanola

473 By December 1880 , the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad had laid track from Antonito , Colorado , to Española . In 1887 , the Texas , Santa Fe & Northern Railroad's route through Buckman Flats was completed . This connected the Chili ...

Espanola

The story of modern Espa-ola begins in 1790, about 100 years after the Pueblo Revolt, at the colonial settlement of Santa Cruz de la Ca-ada, the largest village in the Spanish Empire north of Chihuahua. At that time, the people of the region lived in tiny hamlets clustered around the hub of Santa Cruz. In 1848, following the Mexican American War, the U.S. government annexed New Mexico under the terms of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. Santa Cruz de la Ca-ada was now American territory, connected to a larger world by the Santa Fe Trail. New energy began to flow into the region. The arrival of the Chili Line railroad in 1880 created a corridor of commerce across the river from Santa Cruz--a portent of the Espa-ola to come.

Historic Colorado

Rails headed west to Chama, Durango, and Silverton, and a longgone branch routed trains south to Santa Fe, New Mexico. The latter branch, removed in ... Chili Line for the colorful ristras of chili peppers hung on homes along the way.

Historic Colorado

With its ancient pueblos and dinosaur bones, its gold mines and railroads, and its pioneering place in the westward push of the American frontier, Colorado is a state alive with history. This illustrated adventure through historical Colorado takes readers by scenic backroads from the towering Rocky Mountains to the vast Great Plains, with stops at every turn for a revealing view of the state’s rich past. Filled with spectacular modern photographs and historic black-and-white images, Historic Colorado tells the stories behind the most important and fascinating places in the growth and character of the Centennial State. The book follows in the footsteps of explorers and prospectors, cowpokes and pioneers, down the Santa Fe Trail, across the Continental Divide, up Clear Creek, and over Lizard Head Pass. It explores the legacy of mining, the railroads, and the Old West, as well as the heritage of Native Americans. It ventures through towns and cities, farmland and untamed wilderness, revisiting the stories of the people and personalities who made centuries of history in America's highest state. Maps and travel tips round out the book, making it as useful to the tourist as it is entertaining for the armchair traveler.

Los Alamos Before the Dawn

The Chili Line A factor which greatly accelerated tourism on the plateau was the construction of the railroad from Espanola to Santa ... Santa Fe and Northern Railroad Co. finally completed the track by building north out of Santa Fe .

Los Alamos Before the Dawn


Santa Fe National Park N P Buckman Water Diversion Project

... on the Chili Line or Denver and Rio Grande narrow gauge railroad that ran between Santa Fe and Antonito , Colorado . ... Field includes booster stations and associated water tank , dirt and two - track roadways , and power lines .

Santa Fe National Park  N P    Buckman Water Diversion Project


Awards First Division National Railroad Adjustment Board

may be built up from the oldest available extra conductor and trainmen and while working away from regular district ... point where all scrap incidental to dismantling the Santa Fe Branch , effective September 1 , 1941 , was located .

Awards     First Division  National Railroad Adjustment Board


Rio Grande Rift

Only the development of the San Luis Valley led to a stable , long - term railroad operation , which is reflected in the trackage that remains today . The " Chili Line , " as the route from Antonito to Santa Fe came to be called ...

Rio Grande Rift


Tierra Dulce

A Mirror for the School a Following the two weeks of lectures in Santa Fe , with short field excursions for the study of ... Henry S. Buckman ) , and thence over the Rio Grande which we crossed on the D & RG " chili line " track .

Tierra Dulce

This book is for anyone who has a passion for New Mexico letters, the American Southwest or the life and work of Jesse Nusbaum, one of America's leading archaeologists-a man who was lauded by Life Magazine with a cover story when he brought Mesa Verde out of the mire of time to make it living history. Nusbaum fought to preserve the integrity of a large section of southwestern America which otherwise would have been lost.

Historic Preservation a Plan for New Mexico

Later it went on to Durango , while another branch , the “ Chili Line ” , ran south to Santa Fe . Other parts of the system covered southern Colorado like a web . On the section between Antonito and Chama , track laying was arduous and ...

Historic Preservation  a Plan for New Mexico


Field Conference

Field Conference


Readiscover New Mexico

Tracking. Down. History... We've been thinking we'd like to do a railroad theme. We can make suitcases and get in our ... Books • The Chili Line and Santa Fe, the City Different compiled by Richard L Dorman • New Mexico by Susan and ...

Readiscover New Mexico

Tag along with Rosita the Roadrunner on her journey to learn about the Land of Enchantment. On the trail, meet Roja & Verde (the Chile Twins), Biscochita (a Smart Cookie), Pinon Jay, Dusty the Tumbleweed, and a town full of prairie dogs who love to read. READiscover New Mexico, a recent theme for the Statewide Summer Reading Program sponsored by the New Mexico State Library, encourages the discovery of the vast cultural, natural, historical, and literary treasures found in our beautiful state. Children, adults and families experience some of these for the very first time by visiting Rosita's ultimate source for information: the library. Featured is a literal example of "poetic license," with an introduction by "Tag" the license plate. Join the fun! Children will love coloring the cast of characters and sharing the adventure with their families. Among many classroom uses, teachers can present the fun story as a bi- or tri-lingual playlet. Enrichment material includes a compilation of the programs, activities, crafts, song parodies, celebrations, and bibliographies devised by the children's librarians who brought READiscover New Mexico to life in public libraries throughout the state. Also featured are riddles, New Mexico trivia, relevant websites, an extensive booklist, several recipes for Biscochitos, instructions for making Star-O-Litos, and a large collection of reproducible artwork. Rosita's Ramble is presented in English, Spanish, and Navajo. Welcome! Bienvenidos! Ya'at'eeh! Author KATHY BARCO was Youth Services Coordinator at the New Mexico State Library from 2001-2006. Currently a children's librarian with the Albuquerque/Bernalillo County Public Library, she received the 2006 Leadership Award from the New Mexico Library Association. She is co-author (with Valerie Nye) of "Breakfast Santa Fe Style - A Dining Guide to Fancy, Funky and Family Friendly Restaurants." Designer/Illustrator MIKE JAYNES, a Seattle-based graphic artist, has designed and illustrated six summer reading programs for the New Mexico State Library. Both Kathy and Mike grew up in Los Alamos, New Mexico."

Encyclopedia of North American Railroads

The “Chili Line” to Santa Fe was closed in 1942, and the Marshall Pass route was severed in 1949. Abandonments continued, and by the mid-1950s D&RGW's only narrow-gauge route was from Alamosa to Farmington and Silverton.

Encyclopedia of North American Railroads

Lavishly illustrated and a joy to read, this authoritative reference work on the North American continent’s railroads covers the U.S., Canadian, Mexican, Central American, and Cuban systems. The encyclopedia’s over-arching theme is the evolution of the railroad industry and the historical impact of its progress on the North American continent. This thoroughly researched work examines the various aspects of the industry’s development: technology, operations, cultural impact, the evolution of public policy regarding the industry, and the structural functioning of modern railroads. More than 500 alphabetical entries cover a myriad of subjects, including numerous entries profiling the principal companies, suppliers, manufacturers, and individuals influencing the history of the rails. Extensive appendices provide data regarding weight, fuel, statistical trends, and more, as well as a list of 130 vital railroad books. Railfans will treasure this indispensable work.

World Trade Information Service

This broad - gage line extends from Buenos Aires northwesterly , fanning out into Santa Fe and Cordoba Provinces ... where it connects with the narrow - gage ( meter ) General Belgrano Railway line to northern Chile and Bolivia .

World Trade Information Service


A Study of Nineteenth Century Hispanic Arts and Crafts in the American Southwest

Realizing that the railroad was not going into Santa Fe , and with an eye to the lucrative Colorado mining markets ... forty miles of track from Santa Fe to Española , and put the " Chili Line " as it came to be known , into operation .

A Study of Nineteenth Century Hispanic Arts and Crafts in the American Southwest


In the Shadow of Los Alamos

It was the first railway in America to use three-foot, or “narrow-gauge,” track. ... Georgia Maryol, restaurateur atTomasita's Santa Fe Station—the final destination of the Chili Line—wrote,“Its seventeen hour run ...through mountain ...

In the Shadow of Los Alamos

To read this book is to hear her own quiet voice, describing pueblo ceremonials, detailing the difficulties of life during the war years, and above all recording her own spiritual relationship with the New Mexico landscape.