Trade Wars are Class Wars

How Rising Inequality Distorts the Global Economy and Threatens International Peace Matthew C. Klein, Michael Pettis. Trade Wars Are Class Wars This page intentionally left blank Trade Wars Are Class Wars Half Title.

Trade Wars are Class Wars

"This is a very important book."--Martin Wolf, Financial TimesA provocative look at how today's trade conflicts are caused by governments promoting the interests of elites at the expense of workers Longlisted for the 2020 Financial Times & McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award "Worth reading for [the authors'] insights into the history of trade and finance."--George Melloan, Wall Street Journal Trade disputes are usually understood as conflicts between countries with competing national interests, but as Matthew C. Klein and Michael Pettis show, they are often the unexpected result of domestic political choices to serve the interests of the rich at the expense of workers and ordinary retirees. Klein and Pettis trace the origins of today's trade wars to decisions made by politicians and business leaders in China, Europe, and the United States over the past thirty years. Across the world, the rich have prospered while workers can no longer afford to buy what they produce, have lost their jobs, or have been forced into higher levels of debt. In this thought-provoking challenge to mainstream views, the authors provide a cohesive narrative that shows how the class wars of rising inequality are a threat to the global economy and international peace--and what we can do about it.

Summary of Matthew C Klein Michael Pettis s Trade Wars Are Class Wars

Everest Media,. Insights on Mahew C. Klein & Michael Pes's Trade Wars Are Class Wars Contents Insights from Chapter 1 Insights from Chapter 2 Insights Front Cover.

Summary of Matthew C  Klein   Michael Pettis s Trade Wars Are Class Wars

Please note: This is a companion version & not the original book. Sample Book Insights: #1 Before we can understand how to fix trade, we need to understand what trade is. I. What Is Trade. -> Before we can understand how to fix trade, we must first understand what trade is. Trade today looks nothing like it did before. Companies spread complex manufacturing supply chains across multiple countries to minimize taxes. #2 People get more done when they specialize. International trade is simply an extension of this process across national borders. #3 International trade is simply the extension of specialization, which was first described by the Italian merchant and economist Bartolomeo Visconti in 1277. Specialization is good for both Portuguese and English capitalists, but only if they can trade cloth for wine with each other. #4 International trade is simply the extension of specialization, which was first described by the Italian merchant and economist Bartolomeo Visconti in 1277. Specialization is good for both Portuguese and English capitalists, but only if they can trade cloth for wine with each other.

Trade Wins or Trade Wars

Trade Wars Are Class Wars: How Rising Inequality Distorts the Global Economy and Threatens International Peace 2. The United States-China Trade War: Conflict Between the World's Economic Superpowers 3. Trade War: Containers Don't Lie, ...

Trade Wins or Trade Wars

This book tackles the disconnect between social perceptions and expert knowledge regarding trade policy decisions. Using a Polish language internet database, the authors shed light on areas that need to be addressed when considering the adoption of particular trade policies by applying content and statistical analysis to produce an easy to deploy measure of populism in digital media, the “Media Populism Ratio”. Defining a mismatch between social perception and expert knowledge may contribute to a better understanding of the controversies on free trade, as well as properly defining possible sources of populism and social conflicts – therefore also revealing some potential weaknesses in the trade policy implementation level which are at times neglected or underestimated. The book will be relevant to students and researchers interested in economic policy, economic narratives and cultural economics.

Climate Change as Class War

significant “ restoration of class power ” to the capitalist class.53 Over the last five decades , to quote Warren Buffett , “ There's class warfare , all right ... but it's my class , the rich class , that's making war , and we're ...

Climate Change as Class War

How to build a movement to confront climate change The climate crisis is not primarily a problem of ‘believing science’ or individual ‘carbon footprints’ – it is a class problem rooted in who owns, controls and profits from material production. As such, it will take a class struggle to solve. In this ground breaking class analysis, Matthew T. Huber argues that the carbon-intensive capitalist class must be confronted for producing climate change. Yet, the narrow and unpopular roots of climate politics in the professional class is not capable of building a movement up to this challenge. For an alternative strategy, he proposes climate politics that appeals to the vast majority of society: the working class. Huber evaluates the Green New Deal as a first attempt to channel working class material and ecological interests and advocates building union power in the very energy system we need to dramatically transform. In the end, as in classical socialist movements of the early 20th Century, winning the climate struggle will need to be internationalist based on a form of planetary working class solidarity.

Research Handbook on Trade Wars

International Level Explanations This volume emphasizes several sources of trade wars at the international level, ... Matthew Klein and Michael Pettis (2020), the authors of Trade Wars Are Class Wars, trace the causes of today's trade ...

Research Handbook on Trade Wars

The Research Handbook on Trade Wars presents an informative and in-depth account of the origins, dynamics, and implications of trade wars, which are growing both in scale and scope in today’s increasingly interdependent global economy. Providing the frameworks necessary for understanding the political and economic logics of trade wars, this Handbook will be a valuable source of reference for researchers, government officials, businesses, and post-graduate students interested in international political economy, international economics, economic statecraft, public policy, and international relations.

Trade Links

29 Matthew C. Klein and Michael Pettis, Trade Wars Are Class Wars: How Rising Inequality Distorts the Global Economy and Threatens International Peace (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2020). 30 Ibid. at 221.

Trade Links

The World Trade Organization is undergoing an existential crisis. Trade links the world not only through the flow of international commerce in goods, services, and ideas; but also through its economic, environmental, and social impacts. Trade links are supported by a WTO trading system founded on rules established in the 20th century which do not account for all the modern changes in the global economy. James Bacchus, a founder of the WTO, posits that this global organization can survive and continue to succeed only if the trade links among WTO members are revitalized and reimagined. He explains how to bring the WTO into the twenty-first century, exploring the ways it can be utilized to combat future pandemics and climate change and advance sustainable development, all while continuing to foster free trade. This book is among the first to comprehensively explain the new trade rules needed for our new world.

The Cambridge Companion to Business and Human Rights Law

Cf. M Wolf, 'What Trade Wars Tell Us', Financial Times 18 June 2020: 'Trade war is often presented as a war between ... Trade Wars Are Class Wars (Yale University Press 2020), arguing that the recent financial, debt and trade policy ...

The Cambridge Companion to Business and Human Rights Law

How can businesses operate profitably and sustainably while ensuring that they are applying human rights? It is possible to apply human rights while at the same time decreasing cost and making human rights contribute to profits. Yet business efforts alone are insufficient, and states must possess sufficient regulatory power to work together with businesses and investors – not only to improve human rights but also to foster development more broadly. This textbook, the first of its kind, explores all aspects of the links between business operations and human rights. Its twenty-five chapters guide readers systematically through all the particular features of this intersection, integrating legal and business approaches. Thematic sections cover conceptual and regulatory frameworks, remedies and dispute resolution, and practical enforcement tools. Ideal for courses in business, law, policy and international development, the book is also essential reading for managers in large corporations.

Economic Policies for Sustainability and Resilience

Instead, the world is riven with capital and current account imbalances that have led to trade wars, ... in turn to trade wars as Matthew Klein and Michael Pettis argue in their book, Trade Wars are Class Wars (Klein & Pettis, 2020).

Economic Policies for Sustainability and Resilience

This book explores the issues caused by climate change and environmental degradation, alongside the economic policies that can help secure an environmentally sustainable future. Through examining sustainability and resilience, the neoliberal globalised trading system and recent economic policies are questioned to inquire into whether capitalist economies are compatible with addressing climate change. Prolonged economic growth, forms of ownership, economic equality, the global ecosystem, universal basic services, the Green New Deal, and inclusive growth, are also discussed. Economic Policies for Sustainability and Resilience aims to provide policy options to develop sustainable and resilient market economies. It will be relevant to students, researchers, and policymakers interested in the political economy, environment economics, and economic policy.

Revolution and Counterrevolution in China

As labour's misery in trade surplus countries is correlated with collateral damages in trade - deficit ones , trade wars are indeed class wars.® Making labour cheap as a comparative advantage in the global labour arbitrage hurts labour ...

Revolution and Counterrevolution in China

A history of revolutionary China in the 20th century China under XI Jingping has been experiencing unprecedented change. From the Belt and Road initiative to its involvement in Great Power struggles with the West, China is facing the world once more in the hope of reclaiming a lost Chinese greatness. But is "Socialism with Chinese Characteristics" just neoliberal capitalism under another name? And, if so, how can China reclaim the heritage of the Revolution in this its 70th anniversary? In this panoramic study of Chinese history in the twentieth century, Lin Chun argues that the paradoxes of contemporary Chinese society do not merely echo the tensions of modernity or capitalist development. Instead, they are a product of both the contradictions rooted in its revolutionary history, and the social and political consequences of its post-socialist transition. Revolution and Counterrevolution in China charts China's epic revolutionary trajectory in search of a socialist alternative to the global system, and asks whether market reform must repudiate and overturn the revolution and its legacy.

Financial Cold War

Are jobs lost due to 'bad trade policy'or automation? ... Trade Wars Are Class Wars: How Rising Inequality Distorts the Global Economy and Threatens International Peace. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. Knapp, A. (2019,20 July).

Financial Cold War

A groundbreaking exploration of US-China relations as seen through the lens of international finance Rising tensions between China and the United States have kept the financial markets on edge as a showdown between the world’s two largest economies seems inevitable. But what most people fail to recognise is the major impact that the financial markets themselves have had on the creation and acceleration of the conflict. In Financial Cold War: A View of Sino-US Relations from the Financial Markets, market structure and geopolitical finance expert James Fok explores the nuances of China-US relations from the perspective of the financial markets. The book helps readers understand how imbalances in the structure of global financial markets have singularly contributed to frictions between the two countries. In this book, readers will find: A comprehensive examination of the development of financial markets in both China and the US, as well as the current US dollar-based global financial system Insightful observations of the roles of technology, innovation, regulation, taxation, and politics in the markets, and on their resulting effect on US-Sino relations Thorough explorations of the role of Hong Kong as an intermediary for capital flows between China and the rest of the world Suggestions for how, balancing the many varying interests, policymakers might be able to devise effective strategies for de-escalating current Sino-US tensions Financial Cold War is a can’t-miss resource for anyone personally or professionally interested in the intersection of economics and international relations, financial markets, and the infrastructure underlying the international financial system.

How Are You Going to Pay for That

Klein and Pettis, Trade Wars Are Class Wars, p. 194. 26. Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis data tool FRED, series industrial production, https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/INDPRO/; ibid., series unemployment rate, ...

How Are You Going to Pay for That

A compelling alternative view of the relationship between our politics and our economy. Throughout America, structural problems are getting worse. Economic inequality is near Gilded Age heights, the healthcare system is a mess, and the climate crisis continues to grow. Yet most ambitious policy proposals that might fix these calamities are dismissed as wastefully expensive by default. From the kitchen table to Congress, debates are punctuated with a familiar refrain: “How are you going to pay for that?” This question is designed to shut down policy pushes up front, minimizing any interference with the free market. It comes from neoliberalism, an economic ideology that has overtaken both parties. Proponents insist that markets are naturally-occurring and apolitical—and that too much manipulation of the economy will make our society fall apart. Ryan Cooper argues that our society already is falling apart, and the logically preposterous views of neoliberalism are to blame. Most progressives understand this instinctively, but many lack the background knowledge to make effective economic counterarguments. How Are You Going To Pay For That? is filled with engaging discussions and detailed strategies that policymakers and citizens alike can use to assail even the most entrenched lines of neoliberal logic, and start to undo these long-held misconceptions. Equal parts economic theory, history, and political polemic, this is an essential roadmap for winning the key battles to come.

Chinese Taiwan Yearbook of International Law and Affairs Volume 38 2020

wars” and discriminatory “bilateral trade deals” of President Trump in terms of welfare-reducing, ... Trade Wars Are Class Wars (2020), arguing that the recent financial, debt and trade policy crises in leading economies can only be ...

Chinese  Taiwan  Yearbook of International Law and Affairs  Volume 38  2020

Volume 38 of the Chinese (Taiwan) Yearbook of International Law and Affairs publishes scholarly articles and essays on international and transnational law, as well as compiles official documents on the state practice of the Republic of China (Taiwan) in 2020.

Disorder

Matthew Klein and Michael Pettis have suggested that trade wars are ultimately class wars. In regard to US–China trade, and indeed US–German trade, they argue that 'the world's rich were able to benefit at the expense of the world's ...

Disorder

Getting to grips with the overlapping geopolitical, economic, and political crises faced by Western democratic societies in the 2020s. The 21st century has brought a powerful tide of geopolitical, economic, and democratic shocks. Their fallout has led central banks to create over $25 trillion of new money, brought about a new age of geopolitical competition, destabilised the Middle East, ruptured the European Union, and exposed old political fault lines in the United States. Disorder: Hard Times in the 21st Century is a long history of this present political moment. It recounts three histories - one about geopolitics, one about the world economy, and one about western democracies - and explains how in the years of political disorder prior to the pandemic the disruption in each became one big story. It shows how much of this turbulence originated in problems generated by fossil-fuel energies, and it explains why as the green transition takes place the long-standing predicaments energy invariably shapes will remain in place.

A New Global Economic Order

'the overall balance in goods and services is explained by savings, investment and capital flows, not by bilateral trade balances, as Donald Trump imagines' (summarizing the conclusions of M.Klein/ M.Pettis, Trade Wars Are Class Wars, ...

A New Global Economic Order

A New Global Economic Order: New Challenges to International Trade Law examines the dislocating effects of the policies implemented by the Trump Administration on the global economic order and brings together leading scholars and practitioners of international economic law come together to defend multilateralism against unilateralism and populism.

The War of Words

Matthew Klein and Michael Pettis have argued in their book Trade Wars Are Class Wars that during this period, exorbitant privilege turned into an exorbitant sacrifice. As Americans took on debt, they bought more abroad, ...

The War of Words

A timely call for recovering the true meanings of the nineteenth-century terms that are hobbling current political debates Nationalism, conservatism, liberalism, socialism, and capitalism are among the most fiercely debated ideas in contemporary politics. Since these concepts hark back to the nineteenth century, much of their nuanced meaning has been lost, and the words are most often used as epithets that short-circuit productive discussion. In this insightful book, Harold James uncovers the origins of these concepts and examines how the problematic definition and meaning of each term has become an obstacle to respectful communication. Noting that similar linguistic misunderstandings accompany such newer ideas as geopolitics, neoliberalism, technocracy, and globalism, James argues that a rich historical knowledge of the vocabulary surrounding globalization, politics, and economics—particularly the meaning and the usefulness that drove the original conceptions of the terms—is needed to negotiate the gaps between different understandings and make fruitful political debate once again possible.

Section 301, an amendment to the US Trade Act of 1974, authorizes the president to take actions against foreign ... see Matthew C. Klein and Michael Pettis, Trade Wars Are Class Wars (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2020), ...


Roadmap to a Brighter Future

Trade Wars Are Class Wars: How Rising Inequality Distorts the Global Economy and Threatens World Peace. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2020. Koehn, Nancy. Forged in Crisis: The Making of Five Courageous Leaders.

Roadmap to a Brighter Future

A Wall Street Journal and Publishers Weekly bestseller America's best days should still lie ahead. Here’s the realistic and definitive path to get us there. The future doesn’t just happen. It’s a choice that we can and must help determine. But as our deeply divided nation reels from converging crises and seemingly intractable discord, where do we begin when the stakes are unfathomably high? With multiple possible futures before us, Americans need to understand the specific consequences of our immediate choices, seize the opportunity to renew the nation's promise, and set the stage to benefit current and future generations. If we chart our course correctly, we can emerge from our current troubles with a brighter future in reach of all Americans. Based on decades of expertise in envisioning and articulating policy options, Paul Laudicina lays out four vastly different visions for America's future. In Roadmap to a Brighter Future, he outlines why the best version of America will only come about if the correct actions are taken now—and outlines the ten steps needed to decisively tackle our most pervasive problems and address critical priorities. Laudicina, who led one of the world's most-respected management consultancies and has worked as a longtime senior advisor to Joe Biden, also integrates the uncensored views and fresh ideas of dozens of the world's leading thinkers, CEOs, scientists, government leaders, and innovators, to show why optimism about the United States is not only warranted, but crucial.

Six Faces of Globalization

See also protectionism; tariffs Trade Wars Are Class Wars (Klein and Pettis), 173 Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), 9, 109, 113–115. See also trade agreements Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), 110–113, ...

Six Faces of Globalization

An essential guide to the intractable public debates about the virtues and vices of economic globalization, cutting through the complexity to reveal the fault lines that divide us and the points of agreement that might bring us together. Globalization has lifted millions out of poverty. Globalization is a weapon the rich use to exploit the poor. Globalization builds bridges across national boundaries. Globalization fuels the populism and great-power competition that is tearing the world apart. When it comes to the politics of free trade and open borders, the camps are dug in, producing a kaleidoscope of claims and counterclaims, unlikely alliances, and unexpected foes. But what exactly are we fighting about? And how might we approach these issues more productively? Anthea Roberts and Nicolas Lamp cut through the confusion with an indispensable survey of the interests, logics, and ideologies driving these intractable debates, which lie at the heart of so much political dispute and decision making. The authors expertly guide us through six competing narratives about the virtues and vices of globalization: the old establishment view that globalization benefits everyone (win-win), the pessimistic belief that it threatens us all with pandemics and climate change (lose-lose), along with various rival accounts that focus on specific winners and losers, from China to America’s rust belt. Instead of picking sides, Six Faces of Globalization gives all these positions their due, showing how each deploys sophisticated arguments and compelling evidence. Both globalization’s boosters and detractors will come away with their eyes opened. By isolating the fundamental value conflicts—growth versus sustainability, efficiency versus social stability—driving disagreement and show where rival narratives converge, Roberts and Lamp provide a holistic framework for understanding current debates. In doing so, they showcase a more integrative way of thinking about complex problems.

COVID 19 and World Order

Matthew C. Klein and Michael Pettis, Trade Wars Are Class Wars: How Rising Inequality Distorts the Global Economy and Threatens International Peace (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2020): 126. 4. See, for example, James Bacchus, ...

COVID 19 and World Order

Kissinger Center for Global Affairs, Johns Hopkins University Press is pleased to donate funds to the Maryland Food Bank, in support of the university's food distribution efforts in East Baltimore during this period of food insecurity due to COVID-19 pandemic hardships.

Crossing Borders

Bob Davis and Lingling Wei, Superpower Showdown: How the Battle between Trump and Xi Threatens a New Cold War (New ... Matthew Klein and Michael Pettis, Trade Wars Are Class Wars: How Rising Inequality Distorts the Global Economy and ...

Crossing Borders

Crossing Borders helps students develop a framework for understanding the various disciplines that constitute international studies by exploring the many boundaries they knowingly (and unknowingly) cross on a daily basis. Renowned authors Harry I. Chernotsky and Heidi H. Hobbs address the diverse fields of international studies—geography, politics, economics, sociology, and anthropology—giving instructors a launching point to pursue their own disciplinary interests. This bestseller not only helps students to better grasp international affairs, but also offers advice on how they can engage with global issues through study abroad, internships, and career options. Updated thoroughly to reflect recent events and trends, the Fourth Edition assesses the COVID-19 pandemic; the use of social media to interfere in elections; the role of China in trade, investment, and finance; and the tensions surrounding persistent racial and gender inequities around the world. Included with this text The online resources for your text are available via the password-protected Instructor Resource Site. Learn more