Transatlantic Counter Terrorism Cooperation

While progress has been made, developing this area of cooperation has been more difficult than expected and this book examines the reasons why.

Transatlantic Counter Terrorism Cooperation

An incisive new analysis of transatlantic security cooperation, probing the roots as well as the future directions of this key relationship in world affairs. Since the 1990s, this cooperation has expanded from traditional military security issues into countering terrorism, international organized crime and drug trafficking. This has injected new impetus into transatlantic relations to work together on matters such as intelligence sharing and law enforcement. The events of September 11th 2001 have forced these new patterns of cooperation to the forefront of transatlantic relations. While progress has been made, developing this area of cooperation has been more difficult than expected and this book examines the reasons why. The author argues that many of the difficulties are due to different approaches on either side of the Atlantic and the absence of a dedicated transatlantic security forum in which these issues could be pursued. Furthermore, European nations have been preoccupied with the building of the European Union and have been both reluctant and unable to enter into special patterns of cooperation with the US.

The European Union s Fight Against Terrorism

This book contributes to the understanding of the counter-terrorism (CT) policy of the European Union (EU) by offering a set of analyses focusing on its external dimension.

The European Union   s Fight Against Terrorism

This book contributes to the understanding of the counter-terrorism (CT) policy of the European Union (EU) by offering a set of analyses focusing on its external dimension. Whilst calling for the combination of internal and external policies as well as cooperation with third countries and international institutions, the external dimension of EUCT challenges previous assumptions on the functioning of the EU and offers new testing ground for the latest theoretical and methodological approaches. This volume provides the first systematic assessment of the external dimension of EUCT. It covers transatlantic counter-terrorism cooperation, the interaction between EU institutions and policies, theoretical debates on EU actorness in counter-terrorism and the role of judicial institutions in international counter-terrorism. Furthermore, it draws attention to the need for engaging in new discussions over the post-Lisbon Treaty Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP), the international fight against terrorism, and the way international actors cooperate and compete on the security arena. It will be of interest for both academics and practitioners working on EU foreign policy, transatlantic relations and international counter-terrorism. It will also be of interest for students and journalists specialized on European and international affairs. This book was published as a special issue of European Security.

U S EU Cooperation Against Terrorism

Examines the evolution of U.S.-European Union (EU) counter-terrorism cooperation. Contents: (1) Background on EU Efforts Against Terrorism; (2) U.S.-EU Counter-terrorism Cooperation: Progress to Date; New Law Enforce. and Intell.

U  S   EU Cooperation Against Terrorism

Examines the evolution of U.S.-European Union (EU) counter-terrorism cooperation. Contents: (1) Background on EU Efforts Against Terrorism; (2) U.S.-EU Counter-terrorism Cooperation: Progress to Date; New Law Enforce. and Intell. Cooperation Agree.; Stemming Terrorist Financing; Border Control and Transport Security: Container Security; Passenger Name Record Data; Aviation Security; (3) Ongoing Challenges: Data Privacy: Tracking Terrorist Financing; Sharing Airline Passenger Data; U.S.-EU Framework Agree. on Data Protection; Balancing Transatlantic Travel, Commerce, and Security: Visa Waiver Program; Cargo Screening; Detainee Issues and Civil Liberties; Differences in the U.S. and EU Terrorist Lists.

At the Limits of the Rule of Law EU US Counter terrorism Cooperation

"Ever since 9/11, the United States has considered terrorism as an existential threat to its security and one of the country's reactions to this threat was launching a military intervention in Afghanistan.

At the Limits of the Rule of Law  EU US Counter terrorism Cooperation


U S European Cooperation on Counterterrorism

No one country can win the fight against terrorism alone ; continuing exchanges
on latest developments and best practices is a key aspect of our worldwide effort .
Question : The CSIS study on transatlantic counter - terrorism cooperation ...

U S  European Cooperation on Counterterrorism


EU US Cooperation on Internal Security

This book analyses the cooperation between the European Union and the United States on internal security and counter-terrorism since the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

EU US Cooperation on Internal Security

This book analyses the cooperation between the European Union and the United States on internal security and counter-terrorism since the 9/11 terrorist attacks. In particular, four areas of cooperation are examined: customs and supply chain security; judicial cooperation (the mutual legal assistance and extradition agreements); law enforcement cooperation (the Europol-US agreements); and the EU-US agreements for the sharing of air passengers’ data (PNR agreements). These cases are analysed through a conceptual framework based on the theories of international regimes, with the data being drawn from an extensive documentary analysis of media sources collected through the 'Nexis' database, official documents, and from 13 semi-structured elite interviews with US and EU officials. The book argues that the EU and the US have established a transatlantic internal security regime based on shared principles, norms, rules, and interests. While at the beginning of this process the EU had a more reactive and passive stance at the later stages both the EU and the US were active in shaping the transatlantic political agenda and negotiations. The book demonstrates how the EU has had a much more proactive role in its relations with the US than has often been assumed in the current literature. This book will be of much interest to students of EU policy, foreign policy, international security and IR in general.

Security Integration in Europe

38. Kirchner and Sperling, EU Security Governance, 120–84. 39. Cottey, Security
, 178. 40. Rees, Transatlantic Counter-Terrorism Cooperation, 88. 41. Frattini, “
Keynote Address.” 42. Data from Europol website, www.europol.europa.eu.

Security Integration in Europe

At a time when many observers question the EU’s ability to achieve integration of any significance, and indeed Europeans themselves appear disillusioned, Mai’a K. Davis Cross argues that the EU has made remarkable advances in security integration, in both its external and internal dimensions. Moreover, internal security integration—such as dealing with terrorism, immigration, cross-border crime, and drug and human trafficking—has made even greater progress with dismantling certain barriers that previously stood at the core of traditional state sovereignty. Such unprecedented collaboration has become possible thanks to knowledge-based transnational networks, or “epistemic communities,” of ambassadors, military generals, scientists, and other experts who supersede national governments in the diplomacy of security decision making and are making headway at remarkable speed by virtue of their shared expertise, common culture, professional norms, and frequent meetings. Cross brings together nearly 80 personal interviews and a host of recent government documents over the course of five separate case studies to provide a microsociological account of how governance really works in today’s EU and what future role it is likely to play in the international environment. “This is an ambitious work which deals not only with European security and defense but also has much to say about the policy-making process of the EU in general.” —Ezra Suleiman, Princeton University

A Transatlantic Community of Law

The two sides have proceeded to develop new patterns of cooperation, but
progress has been patchy and slow. ... The determination of the USA to counter
terrorism resulted in notable disagreements with Europe over the treatment of '
enemy ...

A Transatlantic Community of Law

This volume explores law's place in contemporary transatlantic relations and considers its institutional characteristics and trade and security rule-making.

Globalsec Intelligence Reform Initiative

This report's primary focus is the Salafi jihadist terrorist threat.

Globalsec Intelligence Reform Initiative

This report's primary focus is the Salafi jihadist terrorist threat. The key problem the Globsec Intelligence Reform Initiative (GIRI) addresses is that of intelligence and personal data sharing and its operationalisation at the domestic as well as transnational level. Although many intelligence agencies have been at the centre of counter-terrorism efforts since 9/11, this report recognises that as terrorism is fundamentally viewed as a crime in both Europe and North America, law enforcement is increasingly at the centre of better pan-European and transatlantic counter-terrorism cooperation. Crucially, better fusion of intelligence processes, and intelligence and law enforcement agencies, is needed to provide the means for pre-empting terrorist attacks before they occur, rather than relying on effective investigation after the event. Based on existing models, the report introduces four, bottom-up practical solutions to these largely operational and tactical CT challenges.

Fighting Terrorist Financing

This book explains how use of common conventions, standards (e.g., the Financial Action Task Force's standards), and approaches by many different international, regional, and specialized institutions is a major step forward in the fight.

Fighting Terrorist Financing

International and European regional organizations are playing an important role in combating terrorist financing. Underneath news reports of transatlantic tensions and arguments is a significant and largely successful multilateral effort, one that forms the basis for a common international approach to the problem. This book explains how use of common conventions, standards (e.g., the Financial Action Task Force's standards), and approaches by many different international, regional, and specialized institutions is a major step forward in the fight. Author Anne Richard recommends expanding and deepening these efforts across Europe and in neighboring regions. The book also calls for improving methods used to fight terrorist financing.

Challenges for Transatlantic Counterterrorism Cooperation in North Africa

The United States and Europe share a common interest in addressing the growing terrorist threats from North Africa.

Challenges for Transatlantic Counterterrorism Cooperation in North Africa

The United States and Europe share a common interest in addressing the growing terrorist threats from North Africa. The emergence of ISIL as a force in the region - notably in Libya, but also in Egypt and to a lesser degree in Tunisia, Algeria, and Mali - is cause for genuine concern. The ISIL challenge is compounded by the persistence of older terrorist organizations, both local ones such as the region’s various Ansar al Sharias as well as al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), al Qaeda’s local affiliate. Even though ISIL has suffered a blow thanks to the efforts of multiple actors to dislodge it from its safe haven in Sirte, along the Libyan coast, its potentially large number of remaining fighters continue to threaten regional security - as evidenced by the massive U.S. airstrike conducted on a rump ISIL battalion south of Sirte on January 19, 2016, rumored to be retaliation in part for the December 2016 Christmas market attack in Berlin. ISIL and other groups also continue to threaten U.S. and European regional interests, while contributing to Europe’s migration crisis via the central Mediterranean route. As of today, North Africa’s terrorist groups are a clear challenge for transatlantic security, even as other issues in the Levant and Eastern Europe soak up the bulk of policymakers’ attention. -- Publisher description.

The Professionalization of Intelligence Cooperation

... Trust in International Cooperation (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).
Rayner, J. (2011), 'Associate acted for APPGER over MoD information release',
Law Society Gazette (28 April). Rees, W. (2006), Transatlantic Counterterrorism ...

The Professionalization of Intelligence Cooperation

An insightful exploration of intelligence cooperation (officially known as liaison), including its international dimensions. This book offers a distinct understanding of this process, valuable to those involved in critical information flows, such as intelligence, risk, crisis and emergency managers.

Counter Terrorism Networks in the European Union

Transatlantic. Counter-terrorism. Initiatives. So far, the book has explored the
increased density of police cooperation among European countries and at the
EU level. The EU's post-9/11 CT agenda has clearly stipulated several of these
efforts.

Counter Terrorism Networks in the European Union

Counter-Terrorism Networks in the European Union: Maintaining Democratic Legitimacy after 9/11 presents a model of democratic legitimacy for within international counter-terrorism co-operation. Exploring the current practices of European Union (EU) counter-terrorism policing, developed after 9/11, it highlights the current significant challenges to democratic legitimacy and seeks to present tools and solutions which ensure 'democratic' counter-terrorism actions and the protection of human rights. Counter-terrorism policing is now a global concern, with co-operation between security authorities of different countries a crucial feature in the fight to prevent terrorism and extremism. Yet, given the emphasis on pre-emption, this type of policing tends to interfere to a far greater extent with the rights of the individual than traditional policing. This book scrutinises the current focus of enhanced communication between counter-terrorist associates at member-state and EU levels within Europe, alongside analysis of just how far the traditional, protective mechanisms of accountability and oversight are managing to keep up with this development. It proposes that current forms of counter-terrorism policing within the EU should be understood as networks - sets of expert institutional nodes or individual agents, from at least two countries - that are interconnected in order to authorize and provide security with regard to counter-terrorism, using the European Police Office (Europol) as a key example.

Transatlantic Homeland Security

Effective approaches to the major political challenges of our era require
transatlantic cooperation. Global challenges ... The horrific terror attacks on New
York and Washington DC changed international and national politics. It changed
the way ...

Transatlantic Homeland Security

This major new study presents both conceptual and practical guidance at a crucial time when intellectual and practical efforts to protect against the new terrorism should move beyond a purely domestic focus. Creating an effective and integrated national homeland security effort is a significant challenge. Europe and the United States have reacted differently to the emergence of mass casualty terrorism, but must work together to cope with the diverse issue areas, sectors, professions, and relevant actors involved in such a broad-based concept. The authors suggest that Europe and the US have a lot to gain by coordinating more closely, and that the exchange of experience is crucial as we attempt to stay ahead of a learning enemy.

Mapping Transatlantic Security Relations

This book examines how legal, political, and rights discourses, security policies and practices migrate and translate across the North Atlantic.

Mapping Transatlantic Security Relations

This book examines how legal, political, and rights discourses, security policies and practices migrate and translate across the North Atlantic. The complex relationship between liberty and security has been fundamentally recast and contested in liberal democracies since the start of the 'global war on terror'. In addition to recognizing new agencies, political pressures, and new sensitivities to difference, it is important that not to over-state the novelty of the post-9/11 era: the war on terror simply made possible the intensification, expansion, or strengthening of policies already in existence, or simply enabled the shutting down of debate. Working from a common theoretical frame, if different disciplines, these chapters present policy-oriented analyses of the actual practices of security, policing, and law in the European Union and Canada. They focus on questions of risk and exception, state sovereignty and governance, liberty and rights, law and transparency, policing and security. In particular, the essays are concerned with charting how policies, practices, and ideas migrate between Canada, the EU and its member states. By taking ‘field’ approach to the study of security practices, the volume is not constrained by national case study or the solipsistic debates within subfields and bridges legal, political, and sociological analysis. It will be of much interest to students of critical security studies, sociology, law, global governance and IR in general. Mark B. Salter is Associate Professor at the School of Political Studies, University of Ottawa.

Fighting Terrorism and Drugs

1 I ntroduc t i o n 1 For a recent introduction to international police cooperation
see Andreas and Nadelmann 2006; concerning transatlantic counterterrorism
cooperationseealsoRees 2006; for monographs onvariousaspectsofinternational
 ...

Fighting Terrorism and Drugs

Fighting Terrorism and Drugs is an examination of European states in their fight against terrorism and drugs, from the 1960s up to the present day. Jörg Friedrichs explores what makes large European states willing or unwilling to participate in international police cooperation against terrorism and drugs. The book examines forty-eight case studies, with particular regard to the policy preferences of the four largest and most politically important EU Member States: Britain, France, Germany, and Italy. The author argues that if a real understanding of international cooperation is to develop, it is important to understand what individual states want and why they want it. To explain state preferences, Friedrichs considers interests, institutions and ideas from domestic, national and international levels that can affect state preferences either positively or negatively. This theoretically coherent book looks at international police cooperation from a truly international perspective and will be of interest to students and scholars of international relations, terrorism, criminology, international law and European integration.

The US EU Security Relationship

In addition, the book looks in detail at how global and European issues such as EU defence and enlargement policies, nuclear non-proliferation, and the war on terror have affected security relations.

The US EU Security Relationship

A constantly evolving security agenda has become a vital part of US–EU relations. Contemporary security challenges such as the rise of international terrorism and the threat from 'states of concern' have – in recent years – forced the US and the EU to adapt their relationship and work together in new ways. Written by a leading authority, this incisive and wide-ranging book systematically examines the development of the transatlantic security relationship in the post-Cold War era. It assesses the nature of the US and EU as international actors and considers how they cooperate together. Rees argues that – despite divergences of interest after the end of the Cold War – the complex nature of contemporary challenges is driving both sides of the Atlantic towards increased cooperation. In addition, the book looks in detail at how global and European issues such as EU defence and enlargement policies, nuclear non-proliferation, and the war on terror have affected security relations.