Transformation and Tradition in 1960s British Cinema

Over half a century on, the 1960s continue to generate strong intellectual and emotional responses - both positive and negative - and this is no less true in the arena of film.

Transformation and Tradition in 1960s British Cinema

Over half a century on, the 1960s continue to generate strong intellectual and emotional responses - both positive and negative - and this is no less true in the arena of film. Making substantial use of new and underexplored archive resources that provide a wealth of information and insight on the period in question, this book offers a fresh perspective on the major resurgence of creativity and international appeal experienced by British cinema in that dramatic decade. Transformation and Tradition in 1960s British Cinema is the first scholarly volume on this period of British cinema for more than twenty-five years. It provides a major reconsideration of the period by focusing on the central tensions and contradiction between novelty/revolution and continuity/tradition during what remains a highly contentious period of cultural production and consumption.

Transformation and Tradition in 1960s British Cinema

Making substantial use of new and underexplored archive resources that provide a wealth of information and insight on the period in question, this book offers a fresh perspective on the major resurgence of creativity and international ...

Transformation and Tradition in 1960s British Cinema

Over half a century on, the 1960s continue to generate strong intellectual and emotional responses - both positive and negative - and this is no less true in the arena of film. Making substantial use of new and underexplored archive resources that provide a wealth of information and insight on the period in question, this book offers a fresh perspective on the major resurgence of creativity and international appeal experienced by British cinema in that dramatic decade. Transformation and Tradition in 1960s British Cinemais the first scholarly volume on this period of British cinema for more than twenty-five years. It provides a major reconsideration of the period by focusing on the central tensions and contradiction between novelty/revolution and continuity/tradition during what remains a highly contentious period of cultural production and consumption.

Transformation and Tradition in 1960s British Cinema

'Arkadin', 'Film clips', Sight and Sound, vol. 36, no. 2, Spring 1967, p. 99. Another US-television veteran who then made an impact in 1960s British cinema was David Greene, a British actor who had enjoyed substantial success directing ...

Transformation and Tradition in 1960s British Cinema

Making substantial use of new and underexplored archive resources that provide a wealth of information and insight on the period in question, this book offers a fresh perspective on the major resurgence of creativity and international appeal experienced by British cinema in the 1960s

Sixties British Cinema Reconsidered

Our major research project, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, Transformation and Tradition in 1960s British Cinema, culminated in a book of the same name, co-written by the project team and published in 2019.4 This ...

Sixties British Cinema Reconsidered

"Challenging assumptions around Sixties stardom, the book focuses on creative collaboration and the contribution of production personnel beyond the director, and discusses how cultural change is reflected in both film style and cinematic themes."--Publisher description.

Sixties British Cinema Reconsidered

For a more detailed contextual discussion of the field, see Richard Farmer, Laura Mayne, Duncan Petrie and Melanie Williams, Transformation and Tradition in 1960s British Cinema (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2019). 3.

Sixties British Cinema Reconsidered

This collection of exciting new research on British cinema of the 1960s reconsiders and reframes the film culture that emerged from that tumultuous decade. Challenging assumptions around Sixties stardom, the book focuses on creative collaboration and the contribution of production personnel beyond the director, and discusses how cultural change is reflected in both film style and cinematic themes. With perspectives and insights from established scholars and new critical voices, Sixties British Cinema Reconsidered draws on under-explored archival resources to explore four key research areas: stars and stardom; creative collaborations in filmmaking; developments in genre and film style; and how the cinema of the period both responded and contributed to social and cultural transformation in the 1960s.

Colour Films in Britain

Farmer, R. (2019a), 'Film and Pop Music', in R. Farmer, L. Maine, D. Petrie and M. Williams (eds), Transformation and Tradition in 1960s British Cinema, 327–48, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. Farmer, R. (2019b), 'Supplemental ...

Colour Films in Britain

The story of Eastmancolor's arrival on the British filmmaking scene is one of intermittent trial and error, intense debate and speculation before gradual acceptance. This book traces the journey of its adoption in British Film and considers its lasting significance as one of the most important technical innovations in film history. Through original archival research and interviews with key figures within the industry, the authors examine the role of Eastmancolor in relation to key areas of British cinema since the 1950s; including its economic and structural histories, different studio and industrial strategies, and the wider aesthetic changes that took place with the mass adoption of colour. Their analysis of British cinema through the lens of colour produces new interpretations of key British film genres including social realism, historical and costume drama, science fiction, horror, crime, documentary and even sex films. They explore how colour communicated meaning in films ranging from the Carry On series to Monty Python's Life of Brian (1979), from Lawrence of Arabia (1962) to A Passage to India (1984), and from Goldfinger (1964) to 1984 (1984), and in the work of key directors and cinematographers of both popular and art cinema including Nicolas Roeg, Ken Russell, Ridley Scott, Peter Greenaway and Chris Menges.

Musicals at the Margins

cinema and popular culture and is the author of three monographs, the most recent of which, the coauthored Transformation and Tradition in 1960s British Cinema (2019), includes his chapter on the relationship between film and pop music ...

Musicals at the Margins

But is it a musical? This question is regularly asked of films, television shows and other media objects that sit uncomfortably in the category despite evident musical connections. Musicals at the Margins argues that instead of seeking to resolve such questions, we should leave them unanswered and unsettled, proposing that there is value in examining the unstable edges of genre. This collection explores the marginal musical in a diverse range of historical and global contexts. It encompasses a range of different forms of marginality including boundary texts (films/media that are sort of/not quite musicals), musical sequences (marginalized sequences in musicals; musical sequences in non-musicals), music films, musicals of the margins (musicals produced from social, cultural, geographical, and geopolitical margins), and musicals across media (television and new media). Ultimately these essays argue that marginal genre texts tell us a great deal about the musical specifically and genre more broadly.

Movie Workers

... Transformation and Tradition in 1960s British Cinema (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2019). 3. Sue Harper and Vincent Porter, British Cinema of the 1950s: The Decline of Deference (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003), ...

Movie Workers

Rolling the credits on six decades of women in film After the advent of sound, women in the British film industry formed an essential corps of below-the-line workers, laboring in positions from animation artist to negative cutter to costume designer. Melanie Bell maps the work of these women decade-by-decade, examining their far-ranging economic and creative contributions against the backdrop of the discrimination that constrained their careers. Her use of oral histories and trade union records presents a vivid counter-narrative to film history, one that focuses not only on women in a male-dominated business, but on the innumerable types of physical and emotional labor required to make a motion picture. Bell's feminist analysis looks at women's jobs in film at important historical junctures while situating the work in the context of changing expectations around women and gender roles. Illuminating and astute, Movie Workers is a first-of-its-kind examination of the unsung women whose invisible work brought British filmmaking to the screen.

Culture Raise low Rethink high A Representation of the Academic Potential of So Called Low Culture

J. Arthur Rank and the British Film Industry. London: Routledge. Milne, T. (2007). ... Obeat: British Cinema's Curiosities, Obscurities and Forgotten Gems. London: Headpress. ... Transformation and Tradition in 1960s British Cinema.

Culture  Raise    low     Rethink    high     A Representation of the Academic Potential of So Called  Low  Culture

Despite (or more likely due to) being the culture which most affects and interacts with the masses, the broad and definition-evading category of 'popular culture' remains a second-class citizen in academia, relegated to a position of 'low' below a culture deemed 'high' and worthy of scholarly inquiry. This eclectic collection of essays aims to convince that this inequality must be addressed by exploring a variety of supposedly 'low' cultural types and texts through an academic lens, proving that so-called 'low' culture can be a valuable contribution to academic research. That said, raising the 'low' does not mean making it 'high', turning it into an elite category to be accessed only by experts. Rather, the authors are unswerving in their approach that academic writing and fan writing are not mutually exclusive. On the contrary, it is their knowledge and passion as fans of their subject matter that has inspired their chapters, all of which draw upon their considerable experience of engaging as fans in what they discuss. All the chapters have been written by postgraduate students seeking to inspire a new empiricism through which their interests might be fully pursued in their futures as scholars. Emma Buchanan is a British postgraduate researcher and television fan who is currently writing up her PhD thesis on the topic of gender and change in AMC's "The Walking Dead" as understood from the point of view of Jungian depth psychology.

From Blofeld to Moneypenny

Research in the School of Film, Music and Performing Arts at Leeds Beckett University. ... She is the Co-author of Transformation and Tradition in 1960s British Cinema (EUP, 2019), and Author of Female Stars of British Cinema: The Women ...

From Blofeld to Moneypenny

Since its inception, 007 has captured the hearts of a worldwide audience, and the franchise is now available over multiple media platforms, including movie, comic strips, games, graphic novels and fashion statements. This edited collection examines the role that gender has played across the platforms that the James Bond franchise now occupies.

Cinema Memories

Alongside Hollywood films, from Westerns such as The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962) and The Dirty Dozen (1967) were musicals including West Side Story (1961), Mary Poppins (1964) and The Sound of Music (1965), and epics such as The ...

Cinema Memories

"The 1960s was a rich decade for British cinema audiences. Alongside Hollywood films, from Westerns such as The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962) and The Dirty Dozen (1967) were musicals including West Side Story (1961), Mary Poppins (1964) and The Sound of Music (1965), and epics such as The Longest Day (1962), Cleopatra (1963) and The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965) Towards the end of the decade, a new style of filmmaking emerged, with movies such as The Graduate (1967), Bonnie and Clyde (1967), Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) and Easy Rider (1969). Although the total number of screens in the UK declined from over 3,000 in 1960 to little more than half this by the end of the decade, British cinema itself remained buoyant. The decade saw the release of many so-called 'kitchen sink' dramas including Saturday Night and Sunday Morning (1960), A Taste of Honey (1961) and This Sporting Life (1963), together with the 'Swinging London' films such as Darling (1965) and Alfie (1966). It witnessed the birth of the James Bond franchise with Dr No in 1962, followed by five other 007 films by 1969. The well-established 'Carry On' franchise produced many more films: 15 in all between 1960 and 1969. British director David Lean directed the epics Lawrence of Arabia (1962) and Dr Zhivago (1965). Drawing on first-hand memories from over 1000 cinema-goers, Screen Memories reveals what it was like to see these and other films in British cinemas in the 1960s. The authors explore what the social experience of cinema-going was like during this decade. They consider how cinema-goers constructed meanings from the films they watched - through a complex process of negotiation between the films concerned, their own social and cultural identities, and their awareness of changes in British society. Their examination helps the reader envision what light the cultural memory of 1960s cinema-going sheds on how the Sixties in Britain is remembered and interpreted. Either, as many have argued, a period of transformative change, or, as an era marked by considerable continuity with the 1940s and 50s. Positioning their study within debates about memory, 1960s cinema, and the seemingly transformative nature of this decade of British history, the authors reflect on the methodologies deployed, the use of memories as historical sources, and the various ways in which cinema and cinema-going came to mean something to its audiences"--

British art cinema

He was Principal Investigator on the Arts and Humanities Research Council-funded project, 'Transformation and Tradition in British Cinema of the 1960s'. Tom Ryall is Emeritus Professor of Film History at Sheffield Hallam University.

British art cinema

This is the first book to provide a direct and comprehensive account of British art cinema. Film history has tended to view British filmmakers as aesthetically conservative, but the truth is they have a long tradition of experiment and artistry, both within and beyond the mainstream. Beginning with the silent period and running up to the 2010s, the book draws attention to this tradition while acknowledging that art cinema in Britain is a complex and fluid concept that needs to be considered within broader concerns. It will be of particular interest to scholars and students of British cinema history, film genre, experimental filmmaking, and British cultural history.

Women Celebrity and Cultures of Ageing

She is currently working on a study of female British film stars and is co-investigator on the AHRC-funded project 'Transformation and Tradition in British Cinema of the 1960s: Industry, Creativity, and National Branding'.

Women  Celebrity and Cultures of Ageing

This book studies the relationship between women, ageing and celebrity. Focusing on an array of case studies and star/celebrity images, it aims to examine the powerful, contradictory and sometimes celebratory ways in which celebrity culture offers a crucial site for the contemporary and historical construction of discourses on ageing femininities.

British Genres

These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions.

British Genres

In this unprecedented survey of British cinema from the 1930s to the New Wave of the 1960s, Marcia Landy explores how cinematic representation and social history converge. Landy focuses on the genre film, a product of British mass culture often dismissed by critics as "unrealistic," showing that in England such cinema subtly dramatized unresolved cultural conflicts and was, in fact, more popular than critics have claimed. Her discussion covers hundreds of works--including historical films, films of empire, war films, melodrama, comedy, science-fiction, horror, and social problem films--and reveals their relation to changing attitudes toward class, race, national identity, sexuality, and gender. Landy begins by describing the status and value of genre theory, then provides a history of British film production that illuminates the politics and personalities connected with the major studios. In vivid accounts of the films within each genre, she analyzes styles, codes, and conventions to show how the films negotiate history, fantasy, and lived experience. Throughout Landy creates a dynamic sense of genre and of how the genres shape, not merely reflect, cultural conflicts. Originally published in 1991. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

A Companion to British and Irish Cinema

British cinema underwent an irrevocable transformation over that period too, as can be traced through a survey of its ... But by the close of the 1960s, things had changed, the baton of greater cultural relevance and demographic reach ...

A Companion to British and Irish Cinema

A stimulating overview of the intellectual arguments and critical debates involved in the study of British and Irish cinemas British and Irish film studies have expanded in scope and depth in recent years, prompting a growing number of critical debates on how these cinemas are analysed, contextualized, and understood. A Companion to British and Irish Cinema addresses arguments surrounding film historiography, methods of textual analysis, critical judgments, and the social and economic contexts that are central to the study of these cinemas. Twenty-nine essays from many of the most prominent writers in the field examine how British and Irish cinema have been discussed, the concepts and methods used to interpret and understand British and Irish films, and the defining issues and debates at the heart of British and Irish cinema studies. Offering a broad scope of commentary, the Companion explores historical, cultural and aesthetic questions that encompass over a century of British and Irish film studies—from the early years of the silent era to the present-day. Divided into five sections, the Companion discusses the social and cultural forces shaping British and Irish cinema during different periods, the contexts in which films are produced, distributed and exhibited, the genres and styles that have been adopted by British and Irish films, issues of representation and identity, and debates on concepts of national cinema at a time when ideas of what constitutes both ‘British’ and ‘Irish’ cinema are under question. A Companion to British and Irish Cinema is a valuable and timely resource for undergraduate and postgraduate students of film, media, and cultural studies, and for those seeking contemporary commentary on the cinemas of Britain and Ireland.

Women in British Cinema

The 1960s: Delusions of Freedom The 1960s was a period in which social change in Britain appeared to be accelerated: ... But the 1960s was an unusually self-conscious decade, and cultural forms played a crucial role in establishing new ...

Women in British Cinema

This book takes a broad perspective and analyses the ways in which the British film industry has dealt with women and their creativity from 1930 to the present. The first part of the book deals comprehensively with different historical periods in British film culture, showing how the 'agency' of production company, director, distribution company or scriptwriter can bring about new patterns of female stereotyping. The second part looks at the input of women workers into the film process. It assesses the work of women in a variety of roles: directors such as Wendy Toye and Sally Potter, producers such as Betty Box, scriptwriters such as Clemence Dane and Muriel Box, costume designers such as Shirley Russell and Jocelyn Rickards, and editors and art directors. This is a polemical book which is written in a lively and often confrontational manner. It uses fresh archival material and takes energetic issue with those explanatory models of film analysis which impose easy answers onto complex material.

Looking Glass Wars Spies on British Screens since 1960

The process of genre transformation has been presented as a fundamental aspect of the celebrated New Hollywood cinema of the 1960s and 1970s. Wider cultural and social changes meant that the essential myth-making of popular cinema was ...

Looking Glass Wars  Spies on British Screens since 1960

Looking-Glass Wars: Spies on British Screens since 1960 is a detailed historical and critical overview of espionage in British film and television in the important period since 1960. From that date, the British spy screen was transformed under the influence of the tremendous success of James Bond in the cinema (the spy thriller), and of the new-style spy writing of John le Carré and Len Deighton (the espionage story). In the 1960s, there developed a popular cycle of spy thrillers in the cinema and on television. The new study looks in detail at the cycle which in previous work has been largely neglected in favour of the James Bond films. The study also brings new attention to espionage on British television and popular secret agent series such as Spy Trap, Quiller and The Sandbaggers. It also gives attention to the more ‘realistic’ representation of spying in the film and television adaptations of le Carré and Deighton, and other dramas with a more serious intent. In addition, there is wholly original attention given to ‘nostalgic’ spy fictions on screen, adaptations of classic stories of espionage which were popular in the late 1970s and through the 1980s, and to ‘historical’ spy fiction, dramas which treated ‘real’ cases of espionage and their characters, most notably the notorious Cambridge Spies. Detailed attention is also given to the ‘secret state’ thriller, a cycle of paranoid screen dramas in the 1980s which portrayed the intelligence services in a conspiratorial light, best understood as a reaction to excessive official secrecy and anxieties about an unregulated security service. The study is brought up-to-date with an examination of screen espionage in Britain since the end of the Cold War. The approach is empirical and historical. The study examines the production and reception, literary and historical contexts of the films and dramas. It is the first detailed overview of the British spy screen in its crucial period since the 1960s and provides fresh attention to spy films, series and serials never previously considered.

AQA A level History Britain 1851 1964 Challenge and Transformation

along with consumer choice, British people found themselves grappling with social and cultural change brought about by mass affluence. ... Source G From 'Experimental Theatre in the 1960s' by Arthur Marwick, History Today, October 1994 ...

AQA A level History  Britain 1851 1964  Challenge and Transformation

Exam Board: AQA Level: AS/A-level Subject: History First Teaching: September 2015 First Exam: June 2016 AQA approved Enhance and expand your students' knowledge and understanding of their AQA breadth study through expert narrative, progressive skills development and bespoke essays from leading historians on key debates. - Builds students' understanding of the events and issues of the period with authoritative, well-researched narrative that covers the specification content - Introduces the key concepts of change, continuity, cause and consequence, encouraging students to make comparisons across time as they advance through the course - Improves students' skills in tackling interpretation questions and essay writing by providing clear guidance and practice activities - Boosts students' interpretative skills and interest in history through extended reading opportunities consisting of specially commissioned essays from practising historians on relevant debates - Cements understanding of the broad issues underpinning the period with overviews of the key questions, end-of-chapter summaries and diagrams that double up as handy revision aids Democracy, Empire and War: Britain 1851-1964 This title explores political and social reform 1851-1914, the impact of both World Wars, the creation of the Welfare State and the transformational social changes of the 1950s and 1960s. It considers breadth issues of change, continuity, cause and consequence in this period through examining key questions on themes such as democracy, ideology, economy, society, Britain's' position in the world and the impact of key individuals.

Singleness in Britain 1960 1990 Identity Gender and Social Change

Brief Encounters: Lesbians and Gays in British Cinema 1930 – 1971. London: Bloomsbury, 1996. Brooke, Stephen. “'Slumming' in Swinging London? Class, Gender and the Post-War City in Nell Dunn's Up the Junction,” Cultural and Social ...

Singleness in Britain  1960 1990  Identity  Gender and Social Change

This book contributes to an emerging field of research, looking at the significance of marital status to debates about identity and gender. It examines representations and experiences of single men and women between 1960 and 1990, using a wide variety of sources, including digitized British newspapers, social research, films, and lifestyle literature. Whilst much-existing work focuses on the early-to-mid 20th centuries (such as Katherine Holden’s ground-breaking work, The Shadow of Marriage: Singleness in England, 1914-1960), this book alternatively examines the impact of the 1960s and the aftermath of changing attitudes to singleness. While Holden and others, such as Virginia Nicholson in Singled Out, focus largely on social status and lived experience (often through oral testimony), the author is just as interested in finding new ways of looking at gender and sexuality. This work starts from the premise that a distinct double standard existed in attitudes towards single men and women, which continued even after the wave of legislation to improve women’s status during the 1960s. Examining these often vastly different expectations reveals a complex web of progress, continuity, and contradictions, highlighting the uneven pace of social change and its frequent compromises and limitations. Using theoretical approaches such as feminism and queer theory, this work explores the impact of changing gender norms on issues including single fatherhood, old maid stereotypes, and experiences of homelessness. It can be used as a study aid for 20th-century British history and gender studies courses, and might also interest both established academics and intellectually curious non-academic readers. The author has made efforts, where possible, to clearly explain her theoretical approaches and interventions for those who might be unfamiliar with them.