Transitive and Intransitive Verbs English Verb Types

You may find some variation with the other resources.) In this book, you will find the list of transitive verbs that may take two objects.

Transitive and Intransitive Verbs  English Verb Types

A verb can be described as transitive or intransitive based on whether it requires an object to express a complete thought or not. A transitive verb is a verb that requires (takes or allows) an object to receive the action. “Object” may be in the form of a noun, phrase, or pronoun that refers to the person or thing that is affected by the action of the verb. A sentence with a transitive verb can generally be changed into passive voice (however, sometimes a transitive verb cannot be used in the passive voice). A transitive verb can’t stand alone with only a subject. An intransitive verb does not take an object. However, there may take prepositional phrases or adverbs. Adding adverbs or prepositional phrases modifies the verb but doesn’t change its meaning. A sentence with an intransitive verb can never be changed into a passive voice. Some verbs have multiple meanings and can be transitive or intransitive, depending on the sense in which they are used. In some instances, a verb may require an object, while in others it does not require an object. Based on their transitive or/and intransitive uses, verbs may be categorized as follows: 01. Verbs that are usually used only transitively for all their meanings/senses. 02. Verbs that are usually used only intransitively for all their meanings/senses. 03. Verbs that are usually used both transitively and intransitively for all their meanings/senses. 04. Verbs that are used only transitively for one or more particular meanings/senses but also used only intransitively for one or more particular meanings/senses. 05. Verbs that are used only transitively for one or more particular meanings/senses but also used both transitively and intransitively for one or more particular meanings/senses. 06. Verbs that are used only intransitively for one or more particular meanings/senses but also used both transitively and intransitively for one or more particular meanings/senses. 07. Verbs that are used only transitively for one or more particular meanings/senses but also used only intransitively for one or more particular meanings/senses and also used both transitively and intransitively for one or more particular meanings/senses. You will find the detailed list of verbs under each of these 7 categories. (Very Important Note: Verbs have been generally categorized based on their usual meanings/senses. You may find some variation with the other resources.) In this book, you will find the list of transitive verbs that may take two objects. You will also find the list of transitive and intransitive verbs that are used with prepositional phrases or adverbs. Following are some verbs that are usually used only transitively for all their meanings/senses: abandon / abase / typecast / typeset / outrun / rerun / overlay / underpay / misspend / rend / withhold / behold / outgrow / befall / underlie / outdo / abbreviate / abduct / abet / abhor / abolish / abominate / abrade / abridge / abrogate / absent / absolve / absorb / abstract / abuse / accent / accentuate / access / accompany / accomplish / accost / account / accredit / accuse / acquaint / acquire / acquit / action / actuate / addle / address / adduce / adjudge / adjure / administer / admire / adore / adorn / adulterate / adumbrate / advantage / advocate / aerate / affect / affirm Following are some Verbs that are usually used only intransitively for all their meanings/senses: abscond / abseil / abstain / accede / acquiesce / adhere / alight / amble / apologize / fall / dwell / appeal / appear / arc / arise / arrive / aspire / assent / atone / atrophy / augur / backfire / backpack / back-pedal / backspace / backtrack / balloon / banter / barf / bargain / barrel / bask / bay / beef / beetle / belly / bellyache / belong / bet / bicker / bicycle / bifurcate / billet / billow / binge / biodegrade / bitch / bivouac / blabber / blare

Types of Verb in English

Seminar paper from the year 2006 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Linguistics, grade: 2,0, University of Cologne (Institut für Englische Sprache und ihre Didaktik), course: Introduction to Syntax - Proseminar ...

Types of Verb in English

Seminar paper from the year 2006 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Linguistics, grade: 2,0, University of Cologne (Institut für Englische Sprache und ihre Didaktik), course: Introduction to Syntax - Proseminar Linguistics, 3 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: There are many English sentences in which the subject is omitted (most of all imperative sentences like ‘Sit down’) – but it is impossible to leave out the predicate in an English sentence. This predicate can contain several complement stuctures, a direct and an indirect object and adverbs – but it must contain a verb. The category verb can be sperated into the following types: • Transitive Verbs • Intransitive Verbs • Ditransitive Verbs • Copulas (Linking Verbs) and • Complex Transitive Verbs According to these types some verbs require a direct object, others may allow one; some verbs require two objects – a direct and an indirect one; other verbs can be followed by adjectives and some have to be connected to adverbs. It is very important to distinguish between these different categories. The type of verb of course has implications for the rest of the verb but also for the subject. In active sentences patient subjects, which are subjects that are acted upon, always take Intransitive Verbs; agent subjects can have both verb types and instrument subjects, which are acting on something else, need to co-occur with Transitive Verbs in order to show what they are acting on.

English Grammar And Exercises 3

Transitive and Intransitive Verbs 1 . A verb is called Transitive when it is followed by an Object . The verbs in the following sentences are Transitive and their Objects are printed in italics . I have lost my pen , and I cannot find ...

English Grammar And Exercises 3


Transitive and Intransitive Verbs in Ki Idioms

The purpose of this thesis is to examine idiomatic structures with ki in the ki-wo [transitive verb] and ki-ga [intransitive verb] constructions.

Transitive and Intransitive Verbs in Ki Idioms

The purpose of this thesis is to examine idiomatic structures with ki in the ki-wo [transitive verb] and ki-ga [intransitive verb] constructions. It is argued that for Japanese language learners, it is crucial to be able to understand and produce ki idioms, because they are frequently used in everyday speech. There are often misconceptions regarding ki in the West for those who are fans of Japanese culture due to the influence of martial arts and anime, which paint ki as a spiritual energy that can be controlled and developed. However, upon examining the above mentioned idiomatic structures with ki, it is clear that ki can be expressed as both controllable by the subject of ki (transitive), as well as a thing that acts of its own accord and is spontaneous (intransitive). This thesis somewhat corroborates the studies of W. M. Jacobson, Zoe Pei Sui Luk , and Yoshihiko Ikegami by arguing that intransitive constructions are often used in Japanese, and examining both transitive and intransitive expressions with ki is significant to understanding the meanings produced in ki expressions. It is hoped that analyzing 37 transitive and intransitive idiomatic structures with ki will help Japanese language learners not only understand the syntactic and semantic aspects of transitivity in the Japanese language, but also to help these L2 learners conceptualize the abstract noun ki, which can be defined in so many different ways in a dictionary.

Grammar By Diagram Second Edition

3 Basic Sentence Patterns for Intransitive and Transitive Verbs In Chapter 2 we discussed the basic sentence patterns built around state of being verbs and thus containing either a be or a linking verb . In this chapter we will examine ...

Grammar By Diagram   Second Edition

Grammar by Diagram, second edition is a book designed for anyone who wishes to improve grammatical understanding and skill. Using traditional sentence diagraming as a visual tool, the book explains how to expand simple sentences into compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences, and how to employ verbals (infinitives, gerunds, and participles) and other structures for additional variety. The text addresses the most frequent usage errors by explaining how to distinguish between adjectives and adverbs; how to avoid problems of pronoun case, agreement, and consistency; how to ensure that verbs will agree with their subjects and will be appropriate in terms of tense, aspect, voice, and mood; and how to phrase sentences to avoid errors in parallelism or placement of modifiers. Six appendices incorporate further exercises, a summary of key basics from the text, and supplemental material not included in the body of the text but useful for quick reference. This new edition includes additional exercises and has been revised and updated throughout.

Making Sense of Japanese Grammar

Di - ga is the subject marker ; ~ ☆ -o is the direct object marker In this unit , we study the basic contrast between transitive verbs and intransitive verbs and the question of how to use the subject and direct object particles .

Making Sense of Japanese Grammar

Making Sense of Japanese Grammar explains in a lively and highly informative manner basic principles that underlie a wide range of phenomena in Japanese. Students--irrespective of proficiency level and linguistic training--will find clarification on matters of grammar that often seem idiosyncratic and Japanese-specific, such as avoiding the use of certain pronouns, employing the same word order for questions, hidden subjects, polite and direct forms. This volume may be used as a supplementary classroom reading or a helpful reference for students of all levels. Both students and instructors, even those trained in linguistics, will find its accessible explanations of grammatical concepts helpful

Interactive Notebook Language Arts Workbook Grade 7

Student. Instructions: Transitive. and. Intransitive. Verbs. Read the following information. interactive notebook. Use what Cut you out have the learned mini-lesson to create and the attach left-hand it to the page. right-hand page of ...

Interactive Notebook  Language Arts Workbook  Grade 7

Encourage students to create their own learning portfolios with the Mark Twain Interactive Notebook: Language Arts for grade 7. This 64-page interactive notebook includes 28 lessons in nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, and more. Students are encouraged to be creative, use color, and work with interactive content to gain a greater understanding of the topics covered. This workbook helps students record, store, and organize essential information and serve as resources for review and test prep. The Interactive Notebook: Language Arts Series for grades 6 through 8 is designed to allow students to become active participants in their own learning by creating interactive notebooks. Each book provides an easy-to-follow plan for setting up, creating, and maintaining interactive notebooks for the language arts classroom. Mark Twain Media Publishing Company specializes in providing engaging supplemental books and decorative resources to complement middle- and upper-grade classrooms. Designed by leading educators, this product line covers a range of subjects including mathematics, sciences, language arts, social studies, history, government, fine arts, and character.

Principles of General Grammar

I call those Transitive Verbs which are immediately connected with their complements , and the others Intransitive . Thus , in English , " to read , " is a Transitive Verb , for it takes its complement immediately : " I am reading ...

Principles of General Grammar


The Languages of Japan

10.4 Transitive - intransitive pairs In the preceding section we discussed the inflectional system of Japanese verbs at length . Our conclusion was that the suffixal auxiliaries ( and conjunction particles ) attach to the stem of a verb ...

The Languages of Japan

A survey of the two main indigenous languages of Japan includes the most comprehensive study of the polysynthetic Ainu language yet to appear in English as well as a comprehensive analysis of Japanese linguistics.

Transitivity Alternation

Transitivity alternation is based on the syntactic distinction of verbs that are divided into transtive and intransitive verbs. This paper deals with both verb categories, taking into account semantic matters as well.

Transitivity Alternation

Seminar paper from the year 2009 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Linguistics, grade: 1,0, University of Cologne (Englisches Seminar), course: Syntactic structures of English, language: English, abstract: The English grammar has many similarities with the grammar of German, since both have their roots in the Germanic languages. Therefore English and German share lexical and structural, but also semantic properties. In order to deepen one's understanding of these properties this paper will deal with differences and similarities of the English and German verb system. Transitivity alternation is based on the syntactic distinction of verbs that are divided into transtive and intransitive verbs. This paper deals with both verb categories, taking into account semantic matters as well. In English and in German a verb can express the way in which an action affects its object, which is part of the so-called ergative model. This model shall be introduced in Chapter 2 with examples of the English language. After the introduction to the usage of ergative verbs a comparison of English and German structures follows in Chapter 3. Mistakes of translation are often due to structural and semantic differences within the ergative model. English and German verbs do not always provide the same variety of possibilities to express an action, therefore it shall be shown in Chapter 3.1 in which language the verb system is more flexible in regards to ergative processes. Chapter 3.2 deals with morphosyntactic differences of German and English within the ergative model. As the German structure shows similarities as well as differences to the English verbs, an attempt is made in Chapter 4 to discover potential semantic distinctions within those German verbs that either differ or resemble the English structure. The aim of this paper is to bring out a comparison of the English and German language that gives an insight into their verb systems in regards to syntactic as well

Learn Japanese Level 6 Lower Intermediate

The focus of this lesson is transitive and intransitive verb pairs in Japanese. In the previous lesson, we went over the difference between two verbs: suru and naru. Please remember that the main focus of suru is the performer of the ...

Learn Japanese   Level 6  Lower Intermediate

Interactive. Effective. And FUN! Start speaking Japanese in minutes, and learn key vocabulary, phrases, and grammar in just minutes more with Learn Japanese - Level 6: Lower Intermediate - a completely new way to learn Japanese with ease! Learn Japanese - Level 6: Lower Intermediate will arm you with Japanese and cultural insight to utterly shock and amaze your Japanese friends and family, teachers, and colleagues. What you get in Learn Japanese - Level 6: Lower Intermediate: - 380+ pages of Japanese learning material - 25 Japanese lessons: dialog transcripts with translation, vocabulary, sample sentences and a grammar section - 25 Audio Lesson Tracks - 25 Audio Review Tracks - 25 Audio Dialog Tracks This book is the most powerful way to learn Japanese. Guaranteed. You get the two most powerful components of our language learning system: the audio lessons and lesson notes. Why are the audio lessons so effective? - powerful and to the point - syllable-by-syllable breakdown of each word and phrase so that you can say every word and phrase instantly - repeat after the professional teacher to practice proper pronunciation - cultural insight and insider-only tips from our teachers in each lesson - fun and relaxed approach to learning - effortlessly learn from bi-lingual and bi-cultural hosts as they guide you through the pitfalls and pleasures of Japan and Japanese. Why are the lesson notes so effective? - improve listening comprehension and reading comprehension by reading the dialog transcript while listening to the conversation - grasp the exact meaning of phrases and expressions with natural translations - expand your word and phrase usage with the expansion section - master and learn to use Japanese grammar with the grammar section Discover or rediscover how fun learning a language can be with the future of language learning, and start speaking Japanese instantly!

Correct English in the School

About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work.

Correct English in the School

Excerpt from Correct English in the School: Twelve Golden Helps Transitive and Intransitive Verbs - How to Distinguish Them. Pupil. - I still have some difficulty with transitive verbs. Now, of course I understand such constructions as, John struck James that is, I know that struck is transitive, because it has a direct object to receive its action; James being the object - the receiver of the action. Teacher. - That is right. Now, can you not formulate a simple rule for transitive verbs? Pupil. - A transitive verb is a verb that has an object to receive its action. I suppose, then, that transitive verbs are always followed by object nouns; that is, nouns in the objective case that receive the action of the verb. Teacher. - No; that is not so. A better rule is as follows: A transitive verb is a verb that has a receiver for its action. Pupil. - Why is that wording of the rule better than mine! About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

English Grammar in Familiar Lectures Accompanied by a Compendium Embracing a New Systematick Order of Parsing a New System of Punctuation Exercises in False Syntax and a System of Philosophical Grammar in Notes to which are Added an Appendix and a Key to the Exercises Designed for the Use of Schools and Private Learners

VERBS . - TRANSITIVE AND INTRANSITIVE . 55 rally comes before the verb ; and the objective , after it . When I say , George struck the servant , George is in the nominative , and servant is in the objective case ; but , when I say ...

English Grammar in Familiar Lectures  Accompanied by a Compendium  Embracing a New Systematick Order of Parsing a New System of Punctuation  Exercises in False Syntax  and a System of Philosophical Grammar in Notes  to which are Added an Appendix  and a Key to the Exercises  Designed for the Use of Schools and Private Learners


Grammar Usage and Mechanics Secondary

Transitive and Intransitive Verbs Name Date Transitive and Intransitive Verbs A transitive verb expresses action that is directed toward a noun or pronoun . That noun or pronoun is called the direct object . transitive verb direct ...

Grammar  Usage  and Mechanics   Secondary

Receive the special price of $6.99 per book when 10 or more copies are ordered! The Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics workbook has been created to offer and reinforce the basic building blocks of writing. Designed specifically to support each Exploring Writing kit's level, the workbook offers tips, tools, and worksheets to build and practice necessary skills.

Alden s Manifold Cyclopedia of Knowledge and Language

Nor can any exact or permanent division be made into transitive and intransitive . We can say whether a given verb in a particular sentence is used transitively or intransitively ; but not that it is in itself transitive or intransitive ...

Alden s Manifold Cyclopedia of Knowledge and Language


The Languages of the Andes

The Muisca verbal lexicon comprises a formal division between transitive and intransitive verbs. This division is made visible by the conjugational behaviour of the verbs, and in most cases also by the shape of the verb stem itself.

The Languages of the Andes

The Andean and Pacific regions of South America are home to a remarkable variety of languages and language families, with a range of typological differences. This linguistic diversity results from a complex historical background, comprising periods of greater communication between different peoples and languages, and periods of fragmentation and individual development. The Languages of the Andes documents in a single volume the indigenous languages spoken and formerly spoken in this linguistically rich region, as well as in adjacent areas. Grouping the languages into different cultural spheres, it describes their characteristics in terms of language typology, language contact, and the social perspectives of present-day languages. The authors provide both historical and contemporary information, and illustrate the languages with detailed grammatical sketches. Written in a clear and accessible style, this book will be a valuable source for students and scholars of linguistics and anthropology alike.

Syntax changing of the verb phrase from Shakespearian English to the present

Seminar paper from the year 2008 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Linguistics, grade: 2, University of Freiburg, course: The Syntax and Semantics of the English Verb Phrase, language: English, abstract: Blake states ...

Syntax changing of the verb phrase from Shakespearian English to the present

Seminar paper from the year 2008 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Linguistics, grade: 2, University of Freiburg, course: The Syntax and Semantics of the English Verb Phrase, 38 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: Blake states that Shakespeare is like food and that we take both very much for granted. It is only when we come across a passage of particular intensity in a play that we question how the language has been employed to achieve that result, just as it is only for exotic dishes that we enquire about the ingredients (1983:1). It is definitely astonishing how the English Language has been influenced by this incredible playwright and poet. However, it is noticeable that the English Language has changed significantly since the Renaissance. Baugh and Cable (1993:235) argue that “the English grammar in the 16th and early 17th century is marked more by the survival of certain forms, constructions and usages that have since [then] disappeared than by any fundamental developments”. Therefore, I want to show that the syntax of the verb phrase has changed since Elizabethan times. To achieve this, I will compare verb phrases in this term paper which occur in some of Shakespeare’s plays with Modern English verb phrases. First of all, I will define the term “verb phrase”. After that we will focus on transitive and intransitive verbs. Transitivity and intransitivity will be examined – and we will analyze how its usage has changed since Shakespearian times. Thirdly, I will talk about impersonal verbs and afterwards we will study reflexive verbs and the mediopassive. Finally, the passive, inchoative and reflexive meaning of transitive verbs will be discussed. The focus will be on the change or the disappearance of these constructions which occurred between the 16th century and today. I will use some Shakespearian plays which will provide a basis in order to illustrate and to underline my arguments.

An Analytical and Practical Grammar of the English Language

A TRANSITIVE verb expresses an act done by one person or thing to another ; as , “ James strikes the table ; " “ The table is struck by James " ( 367 ) . 318. An INTRANSITIVE verb expresses the being or state of its subject , or an act ...

An Analytical and Practical Grammar of the English Language