Transport in Plants II

In the first part (Part A) of this volume on transport, there was an emphasis on the processes occurring at the membranes bounding the cells.

Transport in Plants II

In the first part (Part A) of this volume on transport, there was an emphasis on the processes occurring at the membranes bounding the cells. It was convenient to distinguish active and passive processes of transport across the membranes, and to recognize that certain transport processes may be regulated by internal factors in the cells such as cytoplasmic pH, concentrations of ions, of malate or of sugar in the vacuoles, or the hydrostatic pressure. Cells in tissues and organs show the same kinds of properties as individual cells, but in addition there can be cell to cell transport related to the organization of the tissue. Firstly cells within a tissue are separated from the external solutions by a diffusion path comprising parts of the cell walls and intercellular spaces; more generally this extra-cytoplasmic part of the tissue has been called the apoplasm. A similar term is "free space". Secondly, the anatomy of cells in tissues seems to allow some facilitated, local transport between cells in a symplasm. Entry into the symplast and subsequent transport in a symplasmic continuum seems to be privileged, in that ions may not have to mix with the bulk of the cytoplasm and can pass from cell to cell in particular cytoplasmic structures, plasmodesmata. In Chara plants, this kind of transport is found operating across the multi-cellular nodes as the main means of transport between the long internodal cells.

Membrane Transport in Plants

In February, 1974, an 'International Workshop on Membrane Transport in Plants' was held at the Nuclear Research Centre, JLiI ich, West Germany.

Membrane Transport in Plants

In February, 1974, an 'International Workshop on Membrane Transport in Plants' was held at the Nuclear Research Centre, JLiI ich, West Germany. More than two hundred and fifty people, from fourteen countries, took part in this highly successful meeting. A somewhat similar meeting took place in Liverpool, England, two years ago and it became clear there that progress in the field of membrane transport in plants was now so marked that a second, and wider, meeting in Germany was more than fully justified. The members of our pro gramme committee (U. Zimmermann, Chairman, JLilich (FRG); J. Dainty,

Physiological Plant Ecology II

CropSci 14:361-364 Bolt GH, Iwata S, Peck AJ, Raats PAC, Rode AA, Vachaud G, Voronin AD (1976) Soil physics terminology. Bull Int Soc Soil Sci 49:26–35 Boyer JS (1974) Water transport in plants: mechanism of ...

Physiological Plant Ecology II

O. L. LANGE, P. S. NOBEL, C. B. OSMOND, and H. ZIEGLER In the original series of the Encyclopedia of Plant Physiology, plant water relations and photosynthesis were treated separately, and the connection between phenomena was only considered in special chapters. O. STOCKER edited Vol ume III, Pjlanze und Wasser/Water Relations of Plants in 1956, and 4 years later, Volume V, Parts I and 2, Die COrAssimilation/The Assimilation of Carbon Dioxide appeared, edited by A. PIRSON. Until recently, there has also been a tendency to cover these aspects of plant physiology separately in most text books. Without doubt, this separation is justifiable. If one is specifically inter ested, for example in photosynthetic electron transport, in details of photophos phorylation, or in carbon metabolism in the Calvin cycle, it is not necessary to ask how these processes relate to the water relations of the plant. Accordingly, this separate coverage has been maintained in the New Series of the Encyclopedia of Plant Physiology. The two volumes devoted exclusively to photosynthesis are Volume 5, Photosynthesis I, edited by A. TREBST and M. AVRON, and Volume 6, Photosynthesis II, edited by M. GIBBS and E. LATZKO. When consider ing carbon assimilation and plant water relations from an ecological point of view, however, we have to recognize that this separation is arbitrary.

Plant Protoplasts and Genetic Engineering II

In: Lüttge U, Pitman MG (eds) Transport in Plants II. Encyclopedia of Plant Physiology, New Series 2 (A). Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New York, pp 53–92 Frehner M, Keller F, Wiemken A (1984) Localization of fructan metabolism in the ...

Plant Protoplasts and Genetic Engineering II


Plant Pathosystems

2: Transport in Plants II Part A: Cells Editors: U. Lüttge, M.G. Pitman With a foreword by R.N.Robertson 97 figures. Approx. 65 tables. XVI, 413 pages. 1976 Contents: Foreword. – Theoretical and Biophysical Approaches.

Plant Pathosystems

One of the points clearly stressed in the beginning of this book is that the essential feature of any dynamic system is change and that, where there is change, there may also be growth and evolution. Plant breeding and plant protection have grown and evolved considerably during the past century; they have also witnessed several, important Hegelian changes. This book, by R.A.Robinson, is just such a change in scientific thinking. It is unique in presenting an entirely new insight to plant-parasite relationships, and in providing a practical guide for managing plant pathosystems for man's advantage in agriculture. The author brings together for the first time in a holistic manner the various plant protection and breeding disciplines; he analyses their past limitations and deficiencies and throws useful new light on the nature of parasitism. From this he is able to gain a clear understanding of the functions of the various pathosystem components. On the basis of this understanding he then proposes practical ways for using these components to achieve and maintain the type of balance which is the basis of survival in any evolutionary system, including that of man himself. All this is done in a lively and elegant manner, using logic as the main driving force to elucidate and define entirely new concepts without obstruse mathematical or biochemical formulae.

Biochemistry and Function of Vacuolar Adenosine Triphosphatase in Fungi and Plants

Physiol Plant 6O: 21-25 Boudet AM, Canut H, Alibert G (1981) Isolation and characterization of Vacuoles from Melt lotus a lba ... In : Lüttge U, Pitman MG (eds) Transport in plants II part A cells: Encyclopedia Plant Phys NS vol. 2.

Biochemistry and Function of Vacuolar Adenosine Triphosphatase in Fungi and Plants


Encyclopedia of Plant Physiology

PhD Thesis , Radcliffe Coll , Cambridge , Mass Goldsmith MHM ( 1966a ) Movement of indoleacetic acid in coleoptiles of Avena sativa L. II . Suspension of polarity by total inhibition of the basipetal transport . Plant Physiol 41 : 15-27 ...

Encyclopedia of Plant Physiology


Intercellular Communication in Plants Studies on Plasmodesmata

ANDERSON, W. P. (1975c). Transport through roots, in "Encyclopaedia of Plant Physiology (Eds. A. Pirson and M. Zimmermann). Vol. 2. Transport in Plants, II. Springer-Verlag, Berlin. ANDERSON, W. P., AIKMAN, D.P. and MEIRI, A. (1970).

Intercellular Communication in Plants  Studies on Plasmodesmata

This Volume attempts to summarise and integrate a field of study in its entirety: the nature of plasmodesmata, and the part these inter cellular connections play in the life of the plant. Except in the all embracing early reviews of the pre-electron microscope era, there has been a tendency for the subject to be approached from disparate points of view: plant physiologists, developmental biologists, biophysicists, virologists and cytologists all contributing to the corpus of knowledge, but often without a full appreciation of each others' goals and probl ems, and sometimes misinterpreting each others' findings. In June 1975 a group of about 40 specialists in these various disciplines, all with a common interest in intercellular communication in plants, met for two days, presented papers, talked, argued, and in general pooled their know ledge. Out of a synthesis of manuscripts and discussions there has emerged, by an editorial process of elimination of unnecessary dupli cation and insertions to ensure completeness of coverage, the present book - not so much a straight record of a conference, as a Monograph based on the proceedings. All of the Chapters are reviews and most include hitherto unpublished data or theoretical treatments.

Physiological Processes in Plant Ecology

In: Lüttge U, Pitman MG (eds) Transport in plants II. Encyclopedia of plant physiology (New Series), vol IIB. Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New York, pp 225–243 Hill R (1965) The biochemist's green mansions: the photosynthetic-electron ...

Physiological Processes in Plant Ecology

In the spring of 1969 a small meeting was convened at the CSIRO Riverina Laboratory, Deniliquin, New South Wales, to discuss the biology of the genus Atriplex, a group of plants considered by those who attended to be of profound importance both in relation to range management in the region and as a tool in physiological research. The brief report of this meeting (Jones, 1970) now serves as a marker for the subsequent remarkable increase in research on this genus, and served then to interest the editors of the Ecological Studies Series in the present volume. This was an exciting time in plant physiology, particularly in the areas of ion absorption and photosynthesis, and unknowingly several laboratories were engaged in parallel studies of these processes using the genus Atriplex. It was also a time at which it seemed that numerical methods in plant ecology could be used to delineate significant processes in arid shrubland ecosystems. Nevertheless, to presume to illustrate and integrate plant physiology and ecology using examples from a single genus was to presume much. The deficiencies which became increasingly apparent during the preparation of the present book were responsible for much new research described in these pages.

Die Mineralische Ern hrung der Pflanze Mineral Nutrition of Plants

FREELAND, R. O.: Effect of transpiration upon the absorption and distribution of mineral salts in plants. Amer. J. Bot. ... MASON, T. G., and E. J. MASKELL: Studies on the transport of carbohydrates in the cotton plant. II.

Die Mineralische Ern  hrung der Pflanze   Mineral Nutrition of Plants


Progress in Botany Vol 82

Planta 121:97–118 Läuchli A (1976) Apoplasmic transport in tissues. In: Lüttge U, Pitman MG (eds) Transport in plants II. Part B tissues and organs. Encyclopedia of plant physiology, New Series vol 2. Springer, Berlin, pp 3–34 Lee Y, ...

Progress in Botany Vol  82

With one volume each year, this series keeps scientists and advanced students informed of the latest developments and results in all areas of the plant sciences. This latest volume includes reviews on plant physiology, biochemistry, genetics and genomics, forests, and ecosystems.

Photoassimilate Distribution Plants and Crops Source Sink Relationships

Plant J. 3,817–828 Krupka, R. M. (1992) Kinetics of transport systems dependent on periplasmic binding proteins. ... II. Immunological characterization. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 978, 65–71 Lemoine, R., Gallet, O., Gillard, C., Frommer, ...

Photoassimilate Distribution Plants and Crops Source Sink Relationships

Adopting an interdisciplinary approach to the study of photoassimilate partitioning and source-sink relationhips, this work details the major aspects of source-sink physiology and metabolism, the integration of individual components and photoassimilate partitioning, and the whole plant source-sink relationships in 16 agriculturally important crops. The work examines in detail the components of carbon partitioning, such as ecology, photosynthesis, loading, transport and anatomy, and discusses the impact of genetic, environmental and agrotechnical factors on the parts of whole plant source-link physiology.

Transport in Plants

This book is addressed to all biologists seeking a review of the various transport processes of minerals and organic substances in plants from the level of cell organelles to the longer-distance movements in the largest trees.

Transport in Plants

This book is addressed to all biologists seeking a review of the various transport processes of minerals and organic substances in plants from the level of cell organelles to the longer-distance movements in the largest trees. It is directed toward students having had some elementary physiol ogy, but the attempt has been made to provide information of interest on the frontiers of current research. Doing this comprehensively, we wished to consider all of the points of view that appeared to be important; on the other hand, space and time were limited. Therefore, the presentation had to strike an intermediate ground between the style of a textbook giving of selected problems and a comprehensive ref representative treatments erence book covering all ramifications. The reader will notice that the pendulum will swing more toward one and then to the other. We did not want to avoid, and we felt it was not appropriate to neglect completely our own special research interests, which led to some emphasis on certain SUbjects. The immediate origin ofthe book is the Heidelberger Taschenbuch 125 (HTB 125) Stojjtransport der Pflanzen by U. L. (1973), which in turn was preceded by an earlier work, Aktiver Transport: Kurzstreckentransport bei Pflanzen Protoplasmatologia vol. VIII17 b by U. L. (1969). At the Li verpool Workshop on Ion Transport in 1972 organized by W. Peter An derson, and while in a jovial and expansive mood, the authors agreed to produce an English version.

Der Stofftransport in der Pflanze Translocation in Plants

II. Elektronenoptische Untersuchungen zur Feinstruktur des Phloembeckens. Z. Pflanzenphysiol. 53, 214–244 (1965). ... Plant Physiol. 41, 15–27 (1966). (Daselbst neuere Literatur über Auxin-Transport!) HABERLANDT, G.: Beiträge zur ...

Der Stofftransport in der Pflanze   Translocation in Plants


Cellular and Subcellular Localization in Plant Metabolism

Plant responses to water stress. Annu. Rev. Plant Physiol. 24: 519–570. 5. Hsiao, T. C. 1976. Stomatal ion transport. In Transport in plants II (U. Lüttge, M. G. Pittman, eds.). Encyclopedia of Plant Physiology, New Series.

Cellular and Subcellular Localization in Plant Metabolism

Morphological differences between cells and the exis tence of morphologically distinct particles have been examined since cells were first recognized. Each techno logical advance in detection and visualization has led to the description of different organelles and cell types. Basic biochemical processes in cells were recognized and are now weIl understood. It is only recently however, that research has expanded to include the specific meta bolic function of the specialized cell types and organelles. In some cases metabolic roles were recognized when the organelles were first described, e.g., chloroplasts, mito chondria, etc., in others the metabolic role remains unknown. Chemical and biochemical specialization in plants or their organelles is equally challenging. Although biochemists have laboured intensivelyon many isolated plant organelles, it is only recently that technical advances have permitted the examination of specialization in the metabolism of cell types. This area of research, although under intensive investigation in some areas of plant metabolism, is still in its infancy. Further developments in methodology or in production of specific genetic lines of plants will greatly improve our understanding of the specialization of different tissues and cell types. This volume describes the current status in the dis cipline as presented in a Symposium on the Cellular and Subcellular Specialization in Plant Metabolism during the Annual Meeting of the Phytochemical Society of North America, at Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y., on August 10-14, 1981.

General Index

Transport in Cells of Storage Tissues R.J.POOLE. ... 251 ATPases Associated with Membranes of Plant Cells - T.KHODGES. ... 347 Transport in Plants II Volume 2 B Part B Tissues and Organs Apoplasmic Transport in Tissues ALAUCHL1,w.

General Index

With about 50,000 entries and subentries, this General Index covers all 25 Volumes and Parts of the well-known ENCYCLOPEDIA OF PLANT PHYSIOLOGY. NEW SERIES. Meticulously compiled by one person, the editor of the series, the index guarantees homogeneous criteria in the selection of all entries. In addition to the entries and for easy reference, the tables of contents of all volumes in the series are also listed. This index makes the entire field of plant physiology accessibleto all researchers and teachers.

Genetic Aspects of Plant Mineral Nutrition

7, 571 578. 3 Cram W J 1976 Negative feedback regulation of transport in cells: The maintenance of turgor, volume and nutrient supply. In Encyclopedia of Plant Physiology, N.S., Vol. 2A: Transport in plants II: Cells.

Genetic Aspects of Plant Mineral Nutrition

This volume presents the proceedings of the Second International Sym posium on Genetic Aspects ofPlant Minerai Nutrition, held in Madison, Wisconsin in 1985. The mechanisms by which plants acquire, transport and utilize essential minerai nutrients are highly complex. The means by which plants either exclude or tolerate ions of metals toxic to plants are equally complex. The first symposium attempted to convene research scientists con cerned with minerai nutrition for the purpose of exploring the kinds of minerai nutrition phenomena identified as being under genetic contro!. The first symposium also placed much emphasis on research to which genetic intervention might be applied. At the second symposium more papers were presented on genetic and breeding research, a long-term objective of the first symposium. The second symposium also included biotic interactions under genetic con trol that either enhanced or impeded ion uptake, e.g. mycorrhizae and nitrogen fixing bacteria. This continuing dialogue is essential for a research area the complexity of which is due to its interdisciplinary nature.

Handbook of Plant and Crop Stress

64. A. E. Hill and B. S. Hill, Mineralions, Transport in Plants. II. B. Tissues and Organs (U. Luttge and M. G. Pitman, eds.), Encyclopedia of Plant Physiology, New Series, Vol. 2B, Springer- Verlag, Berlin, pp. 225-243 (1976). 65.

Handbook of Plant and Crop Stress

Soil salinity and sodicity problems; Plants, crops, and stressful condiyions. Plant and crop response to salt, water, and other envirommental stress conditions; Molecular bilogy and microbiological aspects of plant responses under salt, water, and other envirommental stress conditions. Empirical investigations of specific plants and crops grown under saline, drought, and other environmental stress conditions; Future promise: plants and crops for cultivation under stressful conditions; Irrigating crops with low-quality water; Benefical aspects of stress.