Campervan Crazy

Campervan Crazy

A celebration of the VW campervan in all its guises and a tribute to the diversity of owners who have one love in common

Big Book of Camper Van

Big Book of Camper Van

Anyone who has ever driven a Volkswagen camper will appreciate the appeal of this unique vehicle with its styling and versatility. Over the years it has given joy to millions of people and is now synonymous with the surfing culture that has become so popular today. The origin of this legend dates back to a darker time in history when the determination of Adolf Hitler saw the birth of the equally iconic Beetle. By the end of the Second World War, stripped down Beetles were being used as trucks to ferry parts around the Wolfsberg factory, but Ben Pon - the first to sell Volkswagens outside Germany - saw its true potential and was instrumental in the arrival of the Type 2 T1 camper van (or bus as it was affectionately known) in 1950. The VW camper has seen many changes over the years but is still going strong today and, if anything, has seen a resurgence in popularity over the last few years. The Big Book of Camper Van takes you from the beginnings through to camper vanning in the 21st century. It is a 'must have' for anyone already in love with them, as well as for those who are new to the wonders of the VW camper van world and the joy it undoubtedly brings.

Home Away from Home

The World of Camper Vans and Motorhomes

Home Away from Home

Using a rich wealth of visual material and stories from owners around the world, Home Away from Home looks at the world of camper vans and motorhomes from Airstream to Winnebago, via the ubiquitous VW bus. Lars Eriksen and Kate Trant outline the cultural and social history of the camper van and motorhome in the USA, UK and Europe, looking at a range of phenomena from surf and hippy culture, to family holidays and travel in retirement years. A range of vehicles from recent decades is presented in detail, within the context of their technical development as well as the design strategies that dictated their appearances. Whether about a pioneering spirit, large horizons and wide open spaces, economic travel or a comfortable change of scenery, what is common to camper vans and motorhomes is the need to create a 'home away from home.' This book illustrates the culture of camper van and motorhome travel by looking at the owners and their clubs, telling stories of road trips, adventures and epic voyages.

The VW Camper Van

A Biography

The VW Camper Van

DIV It was invented immediately after the war, in the factory a far-sighted English military man had set up to turn the German economy from making machines of warfare to more pacific products. By the seventies that dream had been amply fulfilled, as the VW Campervan became the conveyance of choice for West Coast hippies, Australian surf bums and Europeans taking the overland route to find enlightenment and good karma in India. It had also become – indeed, still is – the first choice for any couple, or family, seeking a cheap camping holiday with wheels attached. So never mind the oddly off-centre driving wheel, the vagaries of the aircooled rear engine – the VW Campervan had become more than a vehicle – it had truly become a way of life. Mike Harding’s first ride in a Volkswagen Camper Van was back in 1961, when it was the carrying around the gear and bandmembers of his rock band the Manchester Rainmakers. Finally, in 2009, he could wait no longer, and bought his own, a 2001 Type 2 bay window Brazilian import Danbury conversion in hot orange and off white. Add in the endless curiosity of the author of eight monographs on church architecture, and the hilarious sense of humour of one of Britain’s best stand-up comics, and you have a wonderful social history of the postwar years through the prism of a single transport icon. /div

The Volkswagen Bus Book

The Volkswagen Bus Book

Researched in incredible detail, this book explores the story of the timeless VW bus, from early origins through to the present day. This entirely new edition includes details of many of the different camper conversions, and examines the social history and the T2’s evolution. Including full specifications, production figures and buying advice, this is a must for any VW enthusiast.

Africa's Great North Road in a Vw Camper

Cape Town to Mombasa

Africa's Great North Road in a Vw Camper

Emma and I most cordially invite you to accompany us as our special arm-chair guest on an overland journey through the most exciting continent on the Planet Earth. We shall begin our journey in Cape Town, South Africa in the fall of 1964. During the following ten months we will travel and camp along Africa's Great North Road. A variety of recently created nations and peoples, a few still struggling to be free, will be visited, among them, South Africa, Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe), Zambia, Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda and the Congo. There are, at present, more than 700 separate tribes living south of the Great Sahara Desert. Obviously all of them cannot be included. However, we will visit and camp-out with the typical African where he lives, whether it be an Afrikaner living in one of the exclusive multi-level homes cut into the rock cliffs overlooking the Bay of Cape Town surrounded by twelve-foot walls capped with broken glass and razor wire or a Wanderobo tribesman dressed in a loincloth and carrying a bow and sheath of poisoned arrows met along a primitive dusty track running through the Bush country of Tanzania. Our self-contained VW camper gave us the freedom to camp along the streets of any city or village or along the track where Native Africans were living much as they have for many hundreds of years. Please be prepared, watching people and so-called "wild" animals can take many hours and, in some instances, the supply of daylight runs out. Frequently camp was made along the track out in the Bush and was visited by elephants during the night or a pride of lions stopping by to sharpen their claws on our tires. In one instance several elephants stripped branches off a tree under which we were camped - not one of them touched the camper! It was not unusual to be awakened early in the morning by curious men, women and children who wondered what we were doing; curious but quiet and polite. We never experienced an unpleasant incident while camped out in the Bush. Getting lost in the Congo could have been a fatal mistake! My lack of attention exposed us to an outlaw group of renegades left over from the Tanzania-Uganda War. A serious effort has been made throughout to record the details and opinions as the events took place and our conclusions were formulated. The events, we think, have been accurately recorded. The opinions represent our personal interpretations and tentative conclusions. It is our sincere hope that an open-minded reading of our book will increase the degree of public conscious awareness, with respect to the critical predicament of the African peoples, their culture, environment, wildlife and other natural resources.

Travel Tales of Michael Brein: My Best 100

Travel Tales of Michael Brein: My Best 100

The best 100 personal travel tales of travel-adventurer, Dr Michael Brein, the world's first and only travel psychologist. Through harrowing close calls and hilarious misadventures in some of the world's most exotic cultures, Michael Brein examines the in-depth psychological netherworld behind travel. No one has written a travel book heretofore about the psychology of travel quite like this one. This is the expanded (full) edition of the lite version Travel Tales of Michael Brein: My Top 10. Michael Brein is the worlds first and only travel psychologist, who has created a unique series on the psychology of travel as told through the travel tales of more than 1,600 world travelers and adventurers he has interviewed over the last 30 years. My Best 100, the second book in the series, is a collection of Michaels 130 own best personal travel tales, including close calls and great escapes as well as his zaniest and funniest travel experiences. Michael explores his travels, revealing a rare in-depth psychological look at what happens to you when you travel to exotic, strange cultures. My Best 100 promises to be one of the most unusual travel books you will ever read! It might alternately have been named Confessions of a Travel Psychologist or maybe even Tales of the Last Travel Psychologist, since no one has heretofore written about the psychological netherworld of travel as Michael has. When you read Michaels collection of his own travel stories you may wonder if all this could possibly happen to one world traveler. It certainly did! After reading some of his hair-raising and hilarious tales you may further wonder if Michael should have been allowed to travel abroad at all, and if, instead, he should have been locked up in a padded cell with the key being thrown away! You decide! This is the expanded (full) edition of the lite version Travel Tales of Michael Brein: My Top 10.

Perth, Western Australia & the Outback

Perth, Western Australia & the Outback

Following is an excerpt from this extensive & highly detailed guide by a lifetime resident of Australia. The guide covers all the hotels, restaurants, sights to see and activities, from beachgoing to hiking, kayaking to exploring the Outback and the cultural attractions. Australia's largest state takes up nearly a third of the continent, filling some 2,525,250 square kilometers with a diverse mix of extreme and wonderful landscapes. The balmy seaside capital of Perth and its thriving southern suburb of Fremantle, where 1.4 of the state's 1.8 million residents live, are spread along Australia's southwest edge, just north of the Cape Naturaliste hook. South of here, lush river valleys and coastal parks stretch east for more than 1,620 km, while north of Perth, along the rough edge of the Indian Ocean, towns are far and few, with vast natural parklands coloring in the empty spaces between them. The country's westernmost town, Coral Bay, lies halfway up the coast, from where the land cuts back east and north toward Port Hedland and Broome. And still the state sprawls on, further northeast through the great, dry plains of the Kimberley, and south through endless expanses of gold and red desert. Within these great, barren stretches and along the coastlines, however, are hidden treasures that for the past century have fueled much of Australia's economy. The famous goldfields, where fortune-seekers thronged in the late 1800s, surround the southern Outback city of Kalgoorlie-Boulder. Mineral sands and deposits of bauxite, the source for the country's massive aluminum industry, are tucked along the state's southwest edge. Around the Kimberley, or the far northwest, natural gas is the abundant resource, tapped in enormous quantities from the Northwest Shelf. The Pilbara, along the north-central coast, has the world's most extensive iron-ore deposits. And this is all not to mention the world-famous pearls found offshore of Broome, which rack up some US$200 million in yearly exports alone, or the Argyle Diamond mine of the same region, which produces more diamonds a year than anywhere else on the planet. In short, this is a massive state where riches and resources are only just being discovered. Million-hectare cattle stations stretch far and wide; broad national parks with million-year-old natural phenomena take their places in patchwork fashion around them; and thousands of kilometers of desolate, unexplored lands fill the gaps in between. You could wander here for a year and not run into a soul if you were well-prepared, or you could skirt between desert, ocean, and river excursions. There's plenty of history and culture surrounding every settlement, too, providing for a well-rounded adventure experience that delves deep into a very unique blend of environments. With more than 63 national parks, bushwalking is the number-one activity, followed closely by four-wheel-drive adventures. The entire state is edged by the ocean, with magnificent reefs around the center, so diving and snorkeling, boating, windsurfing, and other watersports are all possibilities. Historic cultural excursions take place in the center and the far north Aboriginal lands, while modern encounters might have you wine-tasting through the southwest Margaret River vineyards. You can cycle around the coast, rock climb and abseil in the rugged mountains, explore caves in the central region, camel trek in the desert, kayak the southern rivers, dive and snorkel along remote reefs, and surf chic Perth swells or lonely Pacific bays. The possibilities are as endless as the land, for the state is only just being chiseled into a major adventure destination, and it's a place where you truly have the chance to trail-blaze, get lost, and discover something entirely new about the world - and your own character within it.

Volkswagen Bus

Volkswagen Bus

The Volkswagen Bus in not just a vehicle - it's a movement. This lighthearted look at the Transporter's long and colorful life includes 50 years of history and an abundance of full color photographs. Trace this legendary and easily recognizable vehicle's life from its birth in Germany to its introduction in the US. Growing in popularity in the 1960s, the counterculture movement identified with it and it evolved into a practical family vehicle. With little power and almost no heat, the VW bus still has a faithful following.

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