Tai Shang Gan Ying Pian

TREATISE ON RESPONSE AND RETRIBUTION T'ai - Shang Kan - Ying P'ien LAO TZE Translated by D.T. Suzuki and Paul Carus “ The Exalted One says : Curses and blessings do not come through gates , but man himself invites their arrival .

Tai Shang Gan Ying Pian


Beyond Tolerance

Lao Tze, Treatise on Response and Retribution [First published as T'ai-Shang Kan-Ying P'ien: Treatise of the Exalted One on Response and Retribution] (Peru, Illinois: Open Court Publishing Co., 1906; paperback, 1973) ...

Beyond Tolerance

The author presents beliefs, language, and practices that some of the world religions have in common with Christianity and compares them with Scripture. He states in the preface that the positions of this book have been derived from his reading of Scripture. The first ten chapters compares Christian Scripture with other world religions; the second ten chapters present teaching of the Baha'i Faith concerning global community. The author identifies himself as a member of the Baha'i Faith.

The People and the Dao

... and gave me a pamphlet entitled Taishang's Treatise on Action and Retribution (Taishang ganying pian). ... translators, Treatise on Response and Retribution (LaSalle, Illinois: Open Court Publishing, 1973 [1906]); Li Ying-chang, ...

The People and the Dao

The papers in this volume go back to a conference held September 14-15, 2002, at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, B.C., in honour of Prof. Daniel L. Overmyer on his retirement. The contributions pay tribute to this renowned scholar of Chinese religious traditions, whose work is a constant reminder to look beyond text to context, beyond idea to practice, to study religion as it was and is lived by real people rather than as an abstract system of ideas and doctrines. Contents PHILIP CLART: Introduction RANDALL L. NADEAU: A Critical Review of Daniel L. Overmyer’s Contribution to the Study of Chinese Religions. I. Popular Sects and Religious Movements HUBERT SEIWERT: The Transformation of Popular Religious Movements of the Ming and Qing Dynasties: A Rational Choice Interpretation SHIN-YI CHAO: The Precious Volume of Bodhisattva Zhenwu Attaining the Way. A Case Study of the Worship of Zhenwu (Perfected Warrior) in Ming-Qing Sectarian Groups CHRISTIAN JOCHIM: Popular Lay Sects and Confucianism: A Study Based on the Way of Unity in Postwar Taiwan SOO KHIN WAH: The Recent Development of the Yiguan Dao Fayi Chongde Sub-Branch in Singapore, Malaysia, and Thailand PHILIP CLART: Merit beyond Measure. Notes on the Moral (and Real) Economy of Religious Publishing in Taiwan JEAN DEBERNARDI: "Ascend to Heaven and Stand on a Cloud." Daoist Teaching and Practice at Penang’s Taishang Laojun Temple. II. Historical and Ethnographic Studies of Chinese Popular Religion JOHN LAGERWEY: The History and Sociology of Religion in Changting County, Fujian KENNETH DEAN: The Growth of Local Control over Cultural and Environmental Resources in Ming and Qing Coastal Fujian PAUL R. KATZ: Religion, Recruiting and Resistance in Colonial Taiwan: A Case Study of the Xilai An Incident, 1915 WANG CHIEN-CH’UAN. Transl. PHILIP CLART: The White Dragon Hermitage and the Spread of the Eight Generals Procession Troupe in Taiwan TUEN WAI MARY YEUNG: Rituals and Beliefs of Female Performers in Cantonese Opera JORDAN PAPER: The Role of Possession Trance in Chinese Culture and Religion: A Comparative Overview from the Neolithic to the Present. III. The Religious Life of Clerics, Literati, and Emperors JUDITH BOLTZ: On the Legacy of Zigu and a Manual on Spirit-writing in Her Name STEPHEN ESKILDSEN: Death, Immortality, and Spirit Liberation in Northern Song Daoism. The Hagiographical Accounts of Zhao Daoyi ROBERTO K. ONG: Chen Shiyuan and Chinese Dream Theory BAREND J. TER HAAR: Yongzheng and His Buddhist Abbots. Glossary – Index

One Heart

Treatise on Response & Retribution 5 There are some people whose behavior is unrighteous ... They impoverish others for their own gain ... They break into others' houses to take their property and valuables. Treatise on Response tr ...

One Heart

The purpose of One Heart is to illuminate the common sacred ground at the heart of seven faiths: Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and Taoism. Its method is to identify 65 essential principles, among them: Feel what other people feel; Don't harm others; Lead with virtue and concern for others; Be honest; Practice what you preach; Be content; Don't let anger take over; Choose your companions wisely; Accept the existence of spiritual beings; Seek and you will find. Illustrating each principle are one, two, or three quotations (adding up to more than 600) from a wide variety of texts sacred to each of the seven faiths--including the Old and New Testaments, the Talmud, the Mahabarata, the Tao Te Ching, the Bhagavad Gita, the Analects of Confucius, and many other sacred sources. In addition, each chapter also provides guidance on a spiritual theme or practice--prayer beads, a home altar, labyrinth walking--to enhance our understanding of these wise words and universal principles.

Presenting Japanese Buddhism to the West

Though I was more than once tempted to add my own opinion to that reply , yet I did not dare to do so , thinking that ... T'ai - Shang Kan - Ying P'ien ( Treatise of the exalted one on response and retribution ) ; Yin Chih Wen ( The ...

Presenting Japanese Buddhism to the West

Japanese Buddhism was introduced to the West during the World's Parliament of Religions, in the 1893 Columbian Exposition. In describing and analysing this event, this text challenges the view of Orientalism as a one-way process by which Asian cultures are understood through Western ideas.

Tai shang Kan ying Pien

IF the popularity of books must be measured by either the number of copies in which they appear or the devotion of their readers, the T'ai-Shang Kan-Ying P'ien, i. e.

Tai shang Kan ying Pien

IF the popularity of books must be measured by either the number of copies in which they appear or the devotion of their readers, the T'ai-Shang Kan-Ying P'ien, i. e., "The Treatise of the Exalted One on Response and Retribution," will probably have to be assigned the first place of all publications on the globe. Its editions exceed even those of the Bible and Shakespeare, which of all the books published in the Western world are most numerous, and many millions of devout Chinese believe that great merit is gained by the dissemination of the book. The T'ai-Shang Kan-Ying P'ien is a work of Taoist piety and ethics. It is not so deep as Lao Tze's Tao-Teh-King, but its moral maxims which are noble and pure, are presented with a more popular directness. The main idea of the title is expressed in the words Kan, "response," and Ying, "retribution," which mean that in the spiritual realm of heaven there is "a response" to our sentiments, finding expression in "a retribution" of our deeds. T'ai-Shang, literally, "the Grandly High" or "the Exalted One," is a current name of Lao Tze, the old philosopher, author of the Tao-Teh-King, who is revered by Taoists as the great teacher of mankind, the superior man, and the highest authority of religious truth. Lao Tze's philosophy has percolated into the Chinese nation and we can distinguish three strata: the first represented by the Tao-Teh-King, the second by the T'ai-Shang Kan-Ying P'ien, and the third by the stories appended to it. The first is profound though partly obscure, the second elevating, yet mixed with those popular notions which belong to the domain of mythology, and the third is devout in tone, but sometimes silly in its details. The text of the T'ai-Shang Kan-Ying P'ien consists of several parts: (1) an introduction, (2) moral injunctions, (3) a description of evil-doers and their penalty, (4) sayings from various sources, and (5) the conclusion. Internal evidence suggests that we have before us a compilation in which we can distinguish at least three authors of decidedly different characters. The introduction (being itself a compilation) and the passage "Punishment of Evil-Doers" apparently come from the pen of the final redactor, presumably a Tao Shih, a Taoist scholar or priest, while the second part, "Moral Injunctions," constitutes the most valuable portion of the book. The third part, "The Description of Evil-Doers," is written by a moralizer, or even denouncer, rather than a moralist. Possibly (nay even probably) he is identical with the final redactor, but scarcely with the author of the "Moral Injunctions." He has incorporated quotations from an unknown Taoist source (e. g., the beautiful passage, 1170-1198) and lines from the Buddhist Dhammapada (1210 ff.)

Judaism and the Gentile Faiths

... gentleman recorded in the Treatise on Response and Retribution : “ Extend your help without seeking reward . ... DIVINE RETRIBUTION IN CONFUCIANISM The Confucian view that reciprocity is a doctrine by which Heaven itself is bound ...

Judaism and the Gentile Faiths

Examines the historic development of Jewish religions thought in the cross-cultural context of the world's major faiths. The law, ethics, and mysticism of Judaism are compared with their counterparts in Confucianism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, Christianity, and the secular formulations of religion in modern times.

The People of Taihang

39) The Treatise of the Exalted One on Response and Retribution, or Treatise for short, begins with a statement of the doctrine of reward and retribution, lists acts of meritorious and demeritorious nature and the number of years of ...

The People of Taihang

The Taihang Mountains lay on the border between Shansi and Hopei in China and originally published in 1972, this edited anthology collates family histories as told by the people who lived there. These accounts are a small sample of the family histories that made up the Taihang community taken from poor or lower-middle peasants to discuss the hardships they faced in the early twentieth century and to provide insight into a rural life to a new generation of Chinese youths. This title will be of interest to students of Asian studies and Anthropology.

The Way of Complete Perfection

Treatise on Response (9" Retribution. La Salle, IL: Open Court. Tanahashi, Kazuaki, ed. 1985. Moon in a Dewdrop: 'Writings ofZen Master Do'gen. San Francisco: North Point Press. Tang Guizhang 1979. Quan jin Yuan ci 2 vols.

The Way of Complete Perfection

An anthology of English translations of primary texts of the Quanzhen (Complete Perfection) school of Daoism.

The Renewal of Buddhism in China

Suzuki and Carus, The Treatise of the Exalted One on Response and Retribution, 51. Already mentioned in Shi ji and Fengsu tong. See Takao, “Mindai ni taisei sareta Kōkakaku shisō,” 18. Shih ji, “Tianguan shu.

The Renewal of Buddhism in China

First published in 1981, The Renewal of Buddhism in China broke new ground in the study of Chinese Buddhism. An interdisciplinary study of a Buddhist master and reformer in late Ming China, it challenged the conventional view that Buddhism had reached its height under the Tang dynasty (618–907) and steadily declined afterward. Chün-fang Yü details how in sixteenth-century China, Buddhism entered a period of revitalization due in large part to a cohort of innovative monks who sought to transcend sectarian rivalries and doctrinal specialization. She examines the life, work, and teaching of one of the most important of these monks, Zhuhong (1535–1615), a charismatic teacher of lay Buddhists and a successful reformer of monastic Buddhism. Zhuhong’s contributions demonstrate that the late Ming was one of the most creative periods in Chinese intellectual and religious history. Weaving together diverse sources—scriptures, dynastic history, Buddhist chronicles, monks’ biographies, letters, ritual manuals, legal codes, and literature—Yü grounds Buddhism in the reality of Ming society, highlighting distinctive lay Buddhist practices to provide a vivid portrait of lived religion. Since the book was published four decades ago, many have written on the diversity of Buddhist beliefs and practices in the centuries before and after Zhuhong’s time, yet The Renewal of Buddhism in China remains a crucial touchstone for all scholarship on post-Tang Buddhism. This fortieth anniversary edition features updated transliteration, a foreword by Daniel B. Stevenson, and an updated introduction by the author speaking to the ongoing relevance of this classic work.

Religions of Asia in Practice

(New York: Columbia University Press, 1970); D. T. Suzuki and Paul Cams, trans., Treatise on Response and Retribution by Lao Tze (La Salle: Open Court, 1973). "On Distributing Morality Books" by Huang Zhengyuan ...

Religions of Asia in Practice

The acclaimed volumes of Princeton Readings in Religions present the remarkable range of all that is encompassed in the practice of religions, across the centuries and across the world. Religions of Asia in Practice: An Anthology brings together into a single volume the most important and fascinating selections from the volumes on Buddhism, India, China, Tibet, and Japan to give an overview of how religions have been lived by both ordinary and extraordinary people throughout the continent of Asia. These materials--many of which had never before been translated into any Western language--include ritual manuals, hagiographical and autobiographical writings, popular commentaries, instructions to children, poetry, and folktales. Each is preceded by a substantial introduction in which the translator discusses the text's history and influence and guides the reader through points of potential difficulty and particular interest. The volume includes, in addition, clear and compelling introductions to each of the major traditions. Religions of Asia in Practice: An Anthology offers a fascinating look at the spectrum of religious practices in Asia over almost three millennia. As such, it is ideally suited for use as a textbook in courses on world or Eastern religions as well as for the general reader.

Climbing the Steps to Qingcheng Mountain

Sifu then proceeded to give an example from The Treatise on Response and Retribution, saying: “A bird's nest is its refuge. If we arbitrarily destroy it, then this is what's known as 'something people and the gods cannot tolerate.

Climbing the Steps to Qingcheng Mountain

Mount Qingcheng, one of China's mystical mountains, has been the birth place of discovery, realization and preservation of the recipes that stimulate the deep potential of the human body for generations. This is the book of a Daoist master and spiritual guide Wang Yun as a young seeker and tells the tales of his inner journey which now guides the reader on a path of healing, rejuvenation and actualization of the body's innate potential. Climbing the Steps to Qingcheng Mountain brings Wang Yun's knowledge and wisdom to the West for the first time. · It serves as a guide to health and spiritual practices · including meditation and qigong exercises · based on centuries of Daoist knowledge and wisdom. · Through tales ranging from Daoist immortals to sleep-deprived salesmen, · this book offers guidance to support physical and mental wellbeing in this modern, stressful world. For a preview, exercise videos and more about the author: www.modernwisdomtg.com

Chinese Religions in Contemporary Societies

Many of these ideas are similar to those contained in the Treatise on Response and Retribution (Suzuki and Carus 1950, 60), but the aspirations of the Complete Perfection liturgy are clearly directed toward the attainment of immortality ...

Chinese Religions in Contemporary Societies

A comprehensive introduction to the resurgence of religion in China and Taiwan since the end of the Cultural Revolution and a wide-ranging examination of the impact of religious traditions on Euro-Americans and Chinese immigrants in present-day North America. * A collection of essays written by a diverse lineup of distinguished experts including James Miller, Tam Wai Lun, Ven. Jing Yin, Kim Sung-Hae, Alison Marshall, Tak-ling Terry Woo, David Palmer, Jonathan H. X. Lee, and Elijah Siegler * Photographs illustrating important aspects of Chinese religious practices * A bibliography for each chapter to facilitate further research * An index for fast access to key events, individuals, organizations, deities, religious terms and practices, and time periods

Religions of China in Practice

( New York : Columbia University Press , 1970 ) ; D. T. Suzuki and Paul Carus , trans . , Treatise on Response and Retribution by Lao Tze ( La Salle : Open Court , 1973 ) . “ On Distributing Morality Books ...

Religions of China in Practice

When it comes to our beloved "Good Old Hockey Game," humour abounds in Canada. The Hockey Joke Book shows you just how funny the sport, its teams and its toothless players can be:Q: What do the Ottawa Senators and the Titanic have in common? A: They both look good until they hit the ice!Q: What's the difference between the Calgary Flames and a bra? A: A bra has two cups!Wayne Gretzky, Mario Lemieux and Steve Yzerman all die and meet in heaven. God is sitting in his chair and says to Lemieux, "Mario, what do you believe in?""I believe hockey is the greatest thing in the world and the best sport in history."To that God says, "Take the seat to my left. And Steve, what do you believe in?""I believe bravery is the best."To that God says, "Take the seat to my right. And Wayne, what do you believe in?""I believe you're sitting in my seat!"Q: Why is the Hockey Hall of Fame in Toronto?A: It's the only way Leafs fans can get to see the Stanley Cup! Hockey players have been complaining about violence for years. It's just that without any teeth, no one can understand them.Q: Why doesn't Hamilton have an NHL team?A: Because then Toronto would want one.Bobby Orr walks into an ice-cream parlour. With some discomfort he slides onto a stool and orders a banana spit. The waitress asks, "Crushed nuts?" He replies, "No, bad knees."Q: How many Lindroses does it take to change a light bulb? A: Not even Eric knows because his lights are always out. Four out of five dentists surveyed recommend playing hockey.Plus so much more hilarity

Treatise of the Exalted One on Response and Retribution

Thank you for checking out this book by Theophania Publishing.

Treatise of the Exalted One on Response and Retribution

The reward of good and evil is like the shadow accompanying a body, and so it is apparent[6] that heaven and earth are possessed of crime-recording spirits.

The Other F Word

... there is God Himself” (Sikhism: Adi Granth, Shalok, Kabir, p. 1372) “Show endurance in humiliation and bear no grudge.” (Taoism: Treatise on Response and Retribution) “If you efface and overlook and forgive, then lo! God.

The Other F Word

Does the thought of forgiveness make you cringe? Do you hate the idea of forgiving someone who has wronged you, believing it's a waste of time? Then THIS BOOK IS FOR YOU! If you're like most people, you probably have a certain person you blame for why you're not happier, why you aren't wealthier, or any other condemnation that keeps you stuck. Learn how an ancient method of letting go can help you move mountains and take your power back in just 7 days. Forgiveness Coach, Juliana Ericson, will show you step-by-step how to regain your peace of mind and heart. She shares numerous examples from hundreds of her clients who began with a story of disgust or rage, then successfully turned them into peaceful and empowering situations. This book uniquely addresses blocks to happiness that exist in our conscious memories, and those hidden in our subconscious minds that may have originated early in our childhood, at birth or even in the womb. Ericson explains this deep core programming, and helps us connect the dots from what we experienced at our beginnings to limiting beliefs we may now experience as adults. Grab this wondrous and sacred opportunity to begin anew. You don't have to do it alone; you'll have Juliana's help this time. And it only has to take seven days. Imagine what your life could be if free from resentment and anger. Just imagine the possibilities!

The Ten Loves of God

Treatise on Response and Retribution, 5 The Qur'an ofIslam states ominously, As for the thief, both male and female, cut off their hands. Qur'an 5:38 There are, of course, different kinds of stealing. Synonyms for 144 dr. win green ...

The Ten Loves of God

'Surveys show that many today have a deep hunger for God. Win's book speaks directly and clearly to this spiritual condition. It will clarify and buttress your faith.' George Gallup Jr., pollster, author, and founding chairman, The George H. Gallup International Institute 'With clear prose and compelling insight, The Ten Loves of God takes the reader into the very heart of God's perfect plan for our lives.' Yolanda Pierce, associate professor, Princeton Theological Seminary. Moses received God's Ten Commandments atop a mountain, and ever since they've served as the moral/spiritual foundation for the Judeo/Christian world. But are they still relevant in today's high tech, religiously diverse, sexually aggressive world? Of course they are! In this book, The Ten Loves of God, Win Green celebrates the gift that each command offers.

Daoism

Treatise on Response and Retribution (Chicago, Open Court). Cedzich, Angelika (1993). 'Ghosts and Demons – Law and Order: Grave Quelling Texts and Early Taoist Liturgy', Taoist Resources 4, pp. 23–51. Clarke, J.J. (2000).

Daoism

'The way that can be told is not the eternal Way; the name that can be named is not the eternal Name.' So begins the first verse of the mysterious "Dao De Jing", foundation text of the ancient Chinese religion of Daoism. Often attributed to semi-mythical sage Laozi, the origins of this enigmatic document - which probably came into being in the third century BCE - are actually unknown. But the tenets of Daoism laid down in the "Dao De Jing", and in later texts like the "Yi Jing" (or "Book of Changes"), continue to exert considerable fascination, particularly in the West, where in recent years they have been popularised by writers such as the novelist Ursula K LeGuin.In this fresh and engaging introduction to Daoism, Ronnie L Littlejohn discusses the central facets of a tradition which can sometimes seem as elusive as the slippery notion of 'Dao' itself. The author shows that fundamental to Daoism is the notion of 'Wu-wei', or non-action: a paradoxical idea emphasising alignment of the self with the harmony of the universe, a universe in continual flux and change. This flux is expressed by the famous symbol of Dao, the 'taiji' representing yin and yang eternally correlating in the form of a harmonious circle. Exploring the great subtleties of this ancient religion, Littlejohn traces its development and encounters with Buddhism; its expression in art and literature; its fight for survival during the Cultural Revolution; and its manifestations in modern-day China and beyond.