Trumpets and Tumults

The Memoirs of a Peacekeeper

Trumpets and Tumults

General Rikhyes memoirs are a fascinating, colourful account of a man whose private and professional life has often crossed the parth of history. The scion of a Brahmin family at the Sikh court. Inder Jit Rikhye joined the Indian Army with the blessings of Mahatma Gandhi and fought with the Indian cavalry regiment in the Middle East and Italy in World War II. Returning home to the conclusions of Partition, his regiment splintered his family was forced to leave the Punjab, and he found himself battling in Jammu & Kashmir, in defence of Indias new borders. The warrior then became the peacemaker. After commanding troops in the first UN peacekeeping operation, Rikhye became military adviser to two secretaries-general of the United Nations. Dag Hammarskjöld and U Thant. His work took him from one global hotspot to another, made him confidance of world leaders, and thrust him into negotiations at the highest levels. Peacekeeping led to peace education Rikhye served for twenty years as the president of the International Peace Academy, teaching others the skills he had learned first hand. His unique experience earned him the respect of scholars and policymakers from Washington to Delhi and beyond. This remarkable story is told by General Rikhyes characteristic candor, wit and modesty. Trumpets and Tumults reveals much not only about its author but also about the forces that have shaped the world over the past seventy years.

Pearson's Peacekeepers

Canada and the United Nations Emergency Force, 1956-67

Pearson's Peacekeepers

In 1957, Lester Pearson won the Nobel Peace Prize for creating the United Nations Emergency Force during the Suez crisis. The award launched Canada's enthusiasm and reputation for peacekeeping. Pearson's Peacekeepers explores the reality behind the rhetoric by offering a detailed account of the UNEF's decade-long effort to keep peace along the Egyptian-Israeli border. While the operation was a tremendous achievement, the UNEF also encountered formidable challenges and problems. This nuanced account of Canada's participation in the UNEF challenges perceived notions of Canadian identity and history and will help Canadians to accurately evaluate international peacekeeping efforts today.

The Army in British India

From Colonial Warfare to Total War 1857 - 1947

The Army in British India

The army in India was the principal pillar of British power in South Asia from the mid-nineteenth century until Indian independence. This volume aims to evaluate the combat effectiveness of the army in British India from the mutiny of 1857 until the British departed India in 1947. It examines how the army in India developed from a colonial police force into one of the world's largest volunteer armies which saw service around the globe. The author presents new primary material from international archival sources and develops original interpretations of the political and military role of the army in colonial India. These new arguments include: the army's conduct of 'small wars' on the North-West frontier aided it in conducting tactical warfare in Burma during World War II; small unit raids developed in India were put to good effect beyond India's borders; the army's practical experience of counter-insurgency was used in Greece and Indonesia after 1945; and, contrary to existing scholarship, the British did not follow a deliberate policy of 'Indianization' of the officer corps .

Tumult & Tears

An Anthology of Women's First World War Poetry

Tumult & Tears

During the First World War and its immediate aftermath, hundreds of women wrote thousands of poems on multiple themes and for many different purposes. Womens poetry was published, sold (sometimes to raise funds for charities as diverse as Beef Tea for Troops or The Blue Cross Fund for Warhorses), read, preserved, awarded prizes and often critically acclaimed. Tumult and Tears will demonstrate how womens war poetry, like that of their male counterparts, was largely based upon their day-to-day lives and contemporary beliefs. Poems are placed within their wartime context. From war worker to parent; from serving daughter to grieving mother, sweetheart, wife; from writing whilst within earshot of the guns, whilst making the munitions of war, or whilst sitting in relative safety at home, these predominantly amateur, middle-class poets explore, with a few tantalising gaps, nearly every aspect of womens wartime lives, from their newly public often uniformed roles to their sexuality.

The 1624 Tumult of Mexico in Perspective (c. 1620–1650)

Authority and Conflict Resolution in the Iberian Atlantic

The 1624 Tumult of Mexico in Perspective (c. 1620–1650)

The 1624 Tumult of Mexico in Perspective proves that, despite the various conflicts underlying the disturbances in New Spain between circa 1620 and 1650, there was no intention to do away with the authority of the king.

The Book of the Last Trumpet: Signs of the Apocalypse

Volume 3: A Temple is the Body

The Book of the Last Trumpet: Signs of the Apocalypse

This is an investigation into the science of spirituality and the phenomenon at its foundation, sound vibrations. It details hows the phenomenon of acoustic figures known as Chladni patterns are at the root of what some call Sacred Geometry and how this phenomenon relates directly to the idea of chakras in the body. The book also shows how not only Hindu and Buddhist traditions are based upon this phenomenon, but Jewish, Christian, and Moslem, as well. The culmination of its assertion is that key religious figures whose births are claimed to be special or from a virgin, were actually a product of ancient artificial insemination rituals that were mystically based upon this phenomenon.

Sounding Forth the Trumpet

1837-1860

Sounding Forth the Trumpet

Continuing their U.S. history series, the authors chronicle the years 1837 to 1860, covering the Gold Rush, the Mexican War, and the boiling issues leading to the Civil War.