Why Texans Fought in the Civil War

Third Texas Regiment, arizona Brigade, 18 Thirteenth Brigade Cedar Hill Cavalry (home guard), 54 Thirteenth Texas ... 126 Tullahoma, Battle of, 24 Twelfth Texas Cavalry, 44, 46, 109, 115, 155, 163 Twenty-eighth Texas Cavalry, 119, 127, ...

Why Texans Fought in the Civil War

In Why Texans Fought in the Civil War, Charles David Grear provides insights into what motivated Texans to fight for the Confederacy. Mining important primary sources—including thousands of letters and unpublished journals—he affords readers the opportunity to hear, often in the combatants’ own words, why it was so important to them to engage in tumultuous struggles occurring so far from home. As Grear notes, in the decade prior to the Civil War the population of Texas had tripled. The state was increasingly populated by immigrants from all parts of the South and foreign countries. When the war began, it was not just Texas that many of these soldiers enlisted to protect, but also their native states, where they had family ties.

Texans at Antietam

Chilton, Unveiling and dedication of Monument to Hood's Texas brigade on the capital grounds at Austin, Texas, Thursday, October Twenty-Seven, nineteen hundred and ten, and minutes of the thirty-ninth annual reunion of Hood's Texas ...

Texans at Antietam

The Texans from Hood's Texas Brigade and other regiments who fought at Antietam on 16-17 September 1862 described their experiences of the battle in personal diaries, interviews, newspaper articles, letters, and speeches. Their reminiscences provide a fascinating and harrowing account of the battle as they fought the Army of the Potomac. This book collates their writings alongside speeches that were given in the decades after the battle, during the annual reunions of Hood's Brigade Association and the dedication of the Hood's Brigade Monument at the state capital in Austin, Texas. These accounts describe their actions at the East Woods, Dunker's Church and Miller's Cornfield, and other areas during the battle. For the first time ever, their experiences are compiled in Texans at Antietam: A Terrible Clash of Arms, 16-17 September 1862.

Texans at Gettysburg

Blood and Glory with Hood's Texas Brigade Joseph L Owen, Randy S Drais Fonthill Media ... Texas, Thursday, October Twenty-Seven, Nineteen Hundred and Ten, and Minutes of the Thirty-Ninth Annual Reunion of Hood's Texas Brigade ...

Texans at Gettysburg

The Texans from Hood's Texas Brigade and other regiments who fought at Gettysburg on 1-3 July 1863 described their experiences of the battle in personal diaries, interviews, newspaper articles, letters and speeches. Their reminiscences provide a fascinating and harrowing account of the battle as they fought the Army of the Potomac. Speeches were given in the decades after the battle during the annual reunions of Hood's Brigade Association and the dedication of the Hood's Brigade Monument that took place on 26-27 October 1910 at the state capital in Austin, Texas. These accounts describe their actions at Devil's Den, Little Round Top and other areas during the battle. For the first time ever, their experiences are compiled in Texans at Gettysburg: Blood and Glory with Hood's Texas Brigade.

Black Texans

attitude toward free Negroes changed , however , when the Texas Revolution brought to power Anglo - Americans who adopted restrictions on free black immigration . As a result , in 1850 , five years after annexation , Texas ranked twenty ...

Black Texans

discusses each period of African-American history in terms of politics, violence, and legal status; labor and economic status; education; and social life. Black Texans includes the history of the buffalo soldiers and the cowboys on Texas cattle drives, along with the achievements of notable African-American individuals in Texas history, from Estevan the explorer through legislator Norris Wright Cuney and boxer Jack Johnson to state senator Barbara Jordan. Barr carries.

The African Texans

Cavalry and the Twenty- fourth and Twenty-fifth Infantry all served in West Texas or along the Rio Grande border with Mexico. From Indians they received the respectful nickname of Buffalo Soldiers. Black ministers who served as ...

The African Texans

Immigrants of African descent have come to Texas in waves—first as free blacks seeking economic and social opportunity under the Spanish and Mexican governments, then as enslaved people who came with settlers from the deep South. Then after the Civil War, a new wave of immigration began. In The African Texans, author Alwyn Barr considers each era, giving readers a clear sense of the challenges that faced African Texans and the social and cultural contributions that they have made in the Lone Star State. With wonderful photographs and first-hand accounts, this book expands readers’ understanding of African American history in Texas. Special features include · 59 illustrations · 12 biographical sketches · excerpts from newspaper articles · excerpts from court rulings The African Texans is part of a five-volume set from the Institute of Texan Cultures. The entire set, entitled Texans All, explores the social and cultural contributions made by five distinctive cultural groups that already existed in Texas prior to its statehood or that came to Texas in the early twentieth century: The Indian Texans, The Mexican Texans, The European Texans, The African Texans, and The Asian Texans.

When the Texans Came

[ sic ] Lynde , to a force of three hundred and twenty Texas Volunteers . The particulars of this treacherous and cowardly transaction reached us yesterday , and leaves no longer a doubt of its truth . The officers and men we understand ...

When the Texans Came

Newly-available records from the Civil War in the Southwest, drawn from both Union and Confederate sources, give a much-improved understanding of that period through the words of those who shaped and participated in events at that time.

Pioneer Jewish Texans

in 1837 at age twenty-four he moved to nacogdoches, Texas.5 within months his intellect made him one of the foremost barristers of that Texas town. his growing law practice extended into sabine, san augustine, shelby, ...

Pioneer Jewish Texans

With more than 400 photographs, extensive interviews with the descendants of pioneer Jewish Texan families, and reproductions of rare historical documents, Natalie Ornish’s Pioneer Jewish Texans quickly became a classic following its original release in 1989. This new Texas A&M University Press edition presents Ornish’s meticulous research and her fascinating historical vignettes for a new generation of readers and historians. She chronicles Jewish buccaneers with Jean Lafitte at Galveston; she tells of Jewish patriots who fought at the Alamo and at virtually every major engagement in the war for Texan independence; she traces the careers of immigrants with names like Marcus, Sanger, and Gordon, who arrived on the Texas frontier with little more than the packs on their backs and went on to build great mercantile empires. Cattle barons, wildcatters, diplomats, physicians, financiers, artists, and humanitarians are among the other notable Jewish pioneers and pathfinders described in this carefully researched and exhaustively documented book. Filling a substantial void in Texana and Texas history, the Texas A&M University Press edition of Natalie Ornish’s Pioneer Jewish Texans brings back into circulation this treasure trove of information on a rich and often overlooked vein of the multifaceted story of the Lone Star State.

Ten Deadly Texans

Although graveyards throughout Texas were filled with the bodies of twenty to fifty men Hardin supposedly killed , he was paroled after sixteen years and then issued a full pardon on March 16 , 1894 , by then Texas governor James S.

Ten Deadly Texans

A lighthearted history of ten of Texas’s most notorious outlaws, including Clyde Barrow and a bank robber dressed as Santa Claus. The Wild Westerners were a tough breed. They started young and tended to die young, grow wilder, or fizzle into oblivion. Those outlaws that had the most feuds, gunfights, and robberies within the state lines are profiled here along with their associates, enemies, and accomplices. A rough chronological order of events spanning from pre-Civil War to 1935 tracks significant people and events. With so few lawmen available to police the state, troublesome youths quickly developed into heinous individuals. John Wesley Hardin killed a fellow classmate in a one-room schoolhouse, and eight-year-old James Miller was arrested for murdering his own grandparents. Beginnings and endings for each individual varied. While Sam Bass and Bonnie Parker were cut down in their twenties, Dock Newton didn’t rob his last train until age seventy-seven. Other members of the Barrow Gang lived into their fifties and sixties after transforming themselves from dangerous criminals to ordinary citizens. Texans are often described as being larger than life. Their lives were legendary, their demeanor solid, their illegal activities dramatic and varied from beginning to end. The same lighthearted take on Western history that permeated Dan Anderson and Laurence J. Yadon’s previous works resonates in their latest popular history. True stories, tall tales, and numerous anecdotes comprise this book of ten of the deadliest outlaws to cross the Texas line. Praise for Ten Deadly Texans “Picking the top ten of virtually anything is difficult if not impossible, but [Yadon and Anderson] have presented a strong argument that this grouping belongs at the top of any list of deadly fighters. In their own way, each one chose a deadly path filled with violence, bloodshed, high drama, and excitement.” —Chuck Parsons, author of John B. Armstrong: Texas Ranger and Pioneer Ranchman “A well-researched and highly readable account of the Lone Star State's meanest men and women.” —Mike Cox, author of The Texas Rangers: Wearing the Cinco Peso, 1821–1900 “Yadon and Anderson have done their homework to separate the truth from the legend, because not only are they good historians, they know that the real story is quite often better than the legend. Ten Deadly Texans takes you from the Civil War to the Great Depression, from cow ponies and six-guns to Ford V-8s and automatic weapons, through the real lives of some of Texas’s most notorious sons.” —James R. Knight, author of Bonnie and Clyde: A Twenty-First-Century Update

Chief Bowles and the Texas Cherokees

About twenty Texans followed the Mexicans , traveling over such rough country that many of their horses were soon lamed . Finally Captain Andrews had to turn back , and the Texans who kept up the pursuit were forced to travel slowly to ...

Chief Bowles and the Texas Cherokees

Originally published: University of Oklahoma Press, 1971.

Texans and War

On July 29 Bullis, with twenty Black Seminole scouts and twenty African American cavalrymen (often referred to as Buffalo Soldiers), crossed the Rio Grande about twenty-five miles above the mouth of the Pecos. After riding all night, ...

Texans and War

Beginning with tribal wars among Native Americans before Europeans settled Texas and continuing through the Civil War, the soil of what would become the Lone Star State has frequently been stained by the blood of those contesting for control of its resources. In subsequent years and continuing to the present, its citizens have often taken up arms beyond its borders in pursuit of political values and national defense. Although historians have studied the role of the state and its people in war for well over a century, a wealth of topics remain that deserve greater attention: Tejanos in World War II, the common Texas soldier’s interaction with foreign enemies, the perception of Texas warriors throughout the world, the role of religion among Texans who fight or contemplate fighting, controversial paramilitary groups in Texas, the role and effects of Texans’ ethnicity, culture, and gender during wartime, to name a few. In Texans at War, fourteen scholars provide new studies, perspectives, and historiographies to extend the understanding of this important field. One of the largest collections of original scholarship on this topic to date, Texans and War will stimulate useful conversation and research among historians, students, and interested general readers. In addition, the breadth and originality of its contributions provide a solid overview of emerging perspectives on the military history and historiography of Texas and the region. Partial listing of CONTENTS Introduction Alexander Mendoza and Charles David Grear PART I. Texans Fighting through Time: Thematic Topics 1. The Indian Wars of Texas: A Lipan Apache Perspective p. 17 Thomas A Britten 2. Tejanos at War: A History of Mexican Texans in American Wars Alexander Mendoza 3. Texas Women at War p. 69 Melanie A Kirkland 4. The Influence of War and Military Service on African Texans p. 97 Alwyn Barr 5. The Patriot-Warrior Mystique: John S. Brooks, Walter P. Lane, Samuel H. Walker, and the Adventurous Quest for Renown p. 113 Jimmy L. Bryan Jr. 6. "All Eyes of Texas Are on Comal County": German Texans' Loyalty during the Civil War and World War I p. 133 Charles David Grear PART II. Wars in Texas History: Chronological Conflicts 7. Between Imperial Warfare: Crossing of the Smuggling Frontierand Transatlantic Commerce on the Louisiana-Texas Borderlands, 1754–1785 p. 157 Francis X. Galan8. The Mexican-American War: Reflections on an Overlooked Conflict p. 178 Kendall Milton9. The Prolonged War: Texans Struggle to Win the Civil Warduring Reconstruction p.196 Kenneth W. Howell 10. The Texas lmmunes in the Spanish-American War p. 213 James M. McCaffrey 11. Surveillance on the Border: American Intelligence andthe Tejano Community during World War I p. 227 Jose A. Ramirez 12. Texan Prisoners of the Japanese: A Study in Survival p. 248 Kelly E. Crager 13. Lyndon B. Johnson's Bitch of a War: An Antiwar Essay p. 269 James M. Smallwood 14. Black Paradox in the Age of Terrorism: Military Patriotismor Higher Education p. 283 Ronald E. GoodwinIndex p. 301

Texas

The political changes that impacted Texas beginning in the 1960s continued through the 1980s and 1990s and into the twenty-first century. By the end of the century, Republicans' domination of state politics approached that of the ...

Texas

Written in a narrative style, this comprehensive yet accessible survey of Texas history offers a balanced, scholarly presentation of all time periods and topics.From the beginning sections on geography and prehistoric people, to the concluding discussions on the start of the twenty-first century, this text successfully considers each era equally in terms of space and emphasis.

Her Majesty s Texans

Two English Immigrants in Reconstruction Texas Robert J. Robertson ... first bishop of the Episcopal diocese of Texas, the church boasted more than twenty parishes, including churches in San Augustine, Nacogdoches, Austin, San Antonio, ...

Her Majesty s Texans

Two English Immigrants in Reconstruction Texas.

Tejanos in the 1835 Texas Revolution

To say the least, all citizens of twenty-first-century Texas, whatever their heritage, are correctly identified as Texans, and need not be referred to in any other manner, particularly since Texas pride includes the distinction of ...

Tejanos in the 1835 Texas Revolution

A Texas historian presents a vividly detailed account of the 1835–36 battle for independence, shining new light on the experiences of Tejano rebels. In the 1820s and ‘30s, thousands of settlers from the United States migrated to Mexican Texas, lured by Mexico’s promise of freedom. But when President Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna came to power, he discarded the constitution and established a new centralized government. In 1835 and ‘36, Mexican-born Tejanos and Anglo-born Texans fought side by side to defend their rights against this authoritarian power grab. After Santa Anna silenced decent across Mexico, Texas emerged as the lone province to gain independence. Offering a unique study of the role the Mexican-born revolutionaries played in Texas’s battle for independence, this account examines Mexico from the fifteenth century through the birth of the sovereign nation of Texas in 1836. Drawing heavily on first-person accounts, this detailed history sheds light on the stories and experiences of Tejanos and Texans who endured the fight for liberty. Enhanced by maps and illustrations handcrafted by the author, this volume contributes an important perspective to the ongoing scholarship and debate surrounding the Alamo generation of the 1830s.

The Confederates of Chappell Hill Texas

A man from Chappell Hill led the Rangers in the last great cavalry charge of the war at Bentonville in North Carolina in March ¡865. The Twenty-First, Twenty-Fourth and Twenty-Fifth Texas Cavalry Regiments were formed at Chappell Hill ...

The Confederates of Chappell Hill  Texas

Texas was the South’s frontier in the antebellum period. The vast new state represented the hope and future of many Southern cotton planters. As a result, Texas changed tremendously during the 1850s as increasing numbers of Southern planters moved westward to settle. Planters brought with them large numbers of slaves to plant, cultivate and pick the valuable cash crop; by 1860, slaves made up 30 percent of the total Texas population. No state in the South grew nearly as fast as Texas during this decade, and as the booming economy for cotton led the economic development, the state became increasingly embroiled in the national debate about whether slavery should exist within a democratic republic dedicated to the freedom and independence of man. This work is centered on the role played by the town of Chappell Hill during this portion of Texas history. It offers details about the area’s pre-war prosperity as a center of wealth, influence and aristocracy and describes the angry fervor of the period leading up to the war. Men of this small town played a role in many of the major campaigns and battles of the war, and their motivations for enlisting and their tales of duty are included here. Through excerpts from their correspondence and journals, the book emphasizes personal experiences of the soldiers. Post-war adventures are also offered as the author explores Texas resistance to Federal occupation, the town’s yellow fever epidemic and a period of reconciliation as aging veterans gather at Blue-Gray reunions to reunite the nation.

Texas and Texans in the Civil War

Thirty - fourth Texas Cavalry , 139 , 146 , 148 Thirty - second Texas Cavalry , 59 Thirty - second Texas Infantry ... Mexico , 183 Twelfth Texas Cavalry , 30 , 71 , 76 , 198 Twenty - fifth Texas Cavalry , 73 Twenty - first Texas ...

Texas and Texans in the Civil War

A well-researched volume, drawing from primary documents, official records, manuscripts and printed sources and works of other Texas and Civil War historians.

The Freedmen s Bureau and Black Texans

For a more positive approach , see Barry A. Crouch , " ' Unmanacling ' Texas Reconstruction : A Twenty - Year Perspective , " Southwestern Historical Quarterly 93 ( January 1990 ) : 277-282 ; Ralph A. Wooster , " The Civil War and ...

The Freedmen s Bureau and Black Texans

Fascinating stories of enormous human interest from case studies illustrate both the need for and the effectiveness of the Freedmen's Bureau in Texas. Established by Congress in 1865 to help newly emancipated blacks make the transition from slavery to freedom, the Freedmen's Bureau is considered the first social welfare agency in American history. How effectively the Bureau carried out its mission, however, has long been a subject of debate. In this revisionist study of the Bureau's operations in Texas, Barry A. Crouch challenges traditional views that the Bureau was ineffective and asserts that its agents actually made considerable--and often successful--attempts to assist black Texans. Drawing on a wealth of previously unused documentation in the National Archives, Crouch offers new insights into the workings of the Bureau and the difficulties faced by Texas Bureau officials, who served in a remote and somewhat isolated area with little support from headquarters. Particularly interesting is the case of William G. Kirkman, a conscientious agent who was assassinated for his efforts to help black workers in Boston, Texas. While the Freedmen's Bureau ultimately achieved no lasting success in Texas or elsewhere, Crouch finds that it did not hinder the cause of freed people, as some critics have claimed. Operating during Reconstruction when whites were hostile toward Union efforts to enforce laws protecting blacks, the Bureau helped many individual former slaves and provided a forum where black Texans could assert their legal rights as citizens and free laborers. Of interest to all students of African-American history and of the Reconstruction period in Texas, The Freedmens Bureau and Black Texans is one of only three state studies of the Bureau published in recent years and the first book-length examination of the Bureau in Texas.

Texas and the Texans

On the twenty - second of September , Walker was ordered with twenty - three men to fortify on the Brazos , which he did , at the old Labahia crossing , meeting on his way five of Johnson's men , who uniting with him increased his force ...

Texas and the Texans


Annual Report

It will be remembered that the twenty - four cattle of S. and G. escaped from their pasture on June 19th , and were placed in a pasture badly infected by the Texans for about twenty - four hours , when they returned to their companions ...

Annual Report


Annual Report of the Nebraska State Board of Agriculture for the Year

It will be remembered that the twenty - four cattle of S. and G. escaped from their pasture on June 19th , and were placed in a pasture badly infected by the Texans for about twenty - four hours , when they returned to their companions ...

Annual Report of the Nebraska State Board of Agriculture for the Year


Annual report

It will be remembered that the twenty - four cattle of S. and G. escaped from their pasture on June 19tb , and were placed in a pasture badly infected by the Texans for about twenty - four hours , when they returned to their companions ...

Annual report