Multi verb Constructions

Adjective classes: a cross-linguistic typology, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 178–198. —— (2006) 'Complement clauses and complementation strategies in typological ... Jäger, Andreas (2006) Typology of periphrastic 'do' ...

Multi verb Constructions

This book surveys multi-verb constructions in multiple languages from the Americas, showing a very rich tapestry of typologically unusual constructions, including serial verbs, auxiliaries, co-verbs, phasal verbs. Where possible, a diachronic perspectrive is offered.

Typology of Verbal Categories

(16) di-na matIia yema-ne nemeta 3sgnf-OBJ good cigar-INS 3pl+close eyes/sleep+CAUS 'They made him really asleep with a cigarJ 5.3 Why periphrastic causatives are not serial verb constructions Periphrastic causatives do not qualify as ...

Typology of Verbal Categories

The typological studies of this volume are oriented towards the areas of interests of the Russian typologist Vladimir P. Nedjalkov, to whom the volume is dedicated. They deal with the typology of verbal categories. The book is divided into three parts: 1. "Ergativity and transitivity", 2. "Voice, causative and valency", 3. "Tense and mood". In all three parts of the volume instances of grammaticalization are pointed out and investigated. The studies concern various languages, e.g. English, French, German, Russian, Hungarian, Dutch, Tariana (a North Arawak language from North West Amazonia), Dumi (a Tibeto-Burman language), and Lak (a Daghestanian language).

Studies in the History of the English Language Variation and change in english grammar and lexicon contemporary approaches

While Denison and Ellega ̊rd argue that ambiguous 'do þ infinitive' constructions may have led to a twofold interpretation of the phrase as either a causative and a periphrastic construction, thus contributing to the rise of ...

Studies in the History of the English Language  Variation and change in english grammar and lexicon  contemporary approaches


Grammatikalisierung und grammatische Kategorien

Pb. vii + 242 pp., € 34,90 ISBN 978-3-8196-0674-8 Diversitas Linguarum 12 Typology of periphrastic 'do' - constructions ANDREAS JÄGER 2006. Pb. XII + 343 pp., € 44,90 ISBN 978-3-8196-0675-5 Diversitas Linguarum 13 Durch 'mit' ...

Grammatikalisierung und grammatische Kategorien


A grammar of Palula

Typology of periphrastic 'do'-constructions (Diversitas Linguarum 12). Bochum: Universitätsverlag Dr. N. Brockmeyer. Kay, Paul, Brent Berlin & William Merrifield. 1991. Biocultural implications of systems of color naming. en.

A grammar of Palula

This grammar provides a grammatical description of Palula, an Indo-Aryan language of the Shina group. The language is spoken by about 10,000 people in the Chitral district in Pakistan’s Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province. This is the first extensive description of the formerly little-documented Palula language, and is one of only a few in-depth studies available for languages in the extremely multilingual Hindukush-Karakoram region. The grammar is based on original fieldwork data, collected over the course of about ten years, commencing in 1998. It is primarily in the form of recorded, mainly narrative, texts, but supplemented by targeted elicitation as well as notes of observed language use. All fieldwork was conducted in close collaboration with the Palula-speaking community, and a number of native speakers took active part in the process of data gathering, annotation and data management. The main areas covered are phonology, morphology and syntax, illustrated with a large number of example items and utterances, but also a few selected lexical topics of some prominence have received a more detailed treatment as part of the morphosyntactic structure. Suggestions for further research that should be undertaken are given throughout the grammar. The approach is theory-informed rather than theory-driven, but an underlying functional-typological framework is assumed. Diachronic development is taken into account, particularly in the area of morphology, and comparisons with other languages and references to areal phenomena are included insofar as they are motivated and available. The description also provides a brief introduction to the speaker community and their immediate environment.

Language Change Variation and Universals

The status of ' wh - expletives ' and the partial wh - movement construction of Hungarian . Natural Language and Linguistic Theory 15 ( 3 ) . ... Typology of Periphrastic ' Do ' - constructions . Bochum : Brockmeyer . Jäger , Andreas .

Language Change  Variation  and Universals

This volume explores how human languages become what they are, why they differ from one another in certain ways but not in others, and why they change in the ways that they do. Given that language is a universal creation of the human mind, the puzzle is why there are different languages at all: why do we not all speak the same language? Moreover, while there is considerable variation, in some ways grammars do show consistent patterns: why are languages similar in those respects, and why are those particular patterns preferred? Peter Culicover proposes that the solution to these puzzles is a constructional one. Grammars consist of constructions that carry out the function of expressing universal conceptual structure. While there are in principle many different ways of accomplishing this task, languages are under press to reduce constructional complexity. The result is that there is constructional change in the direction of less complexity, and grammatical patterns emerge that more efficiently reflect conceptual universals. The volume is divided into three parts: the first establishes the theoretical foundations; the second explores variation in argument structure, grammatical functions, and A-bar constructions, drawing on data from a variety of languages including English and Plains Cree; and the third examines constructional change, focusing primarily on Germanic. The study ends with observations and speculations on parameter theory, analogy, the origins of typological patterns, and Greenbergian 'universals'.

Variation Rolls the Dice

In The Native Languages of South America : Origins , Development , Typology , L. O'Connor & P. Muysken ( eds ) , 223-249 . Cambridge : CUP . Bruil , M. 2008. ... Typology of Periphrastic Do ' - Constructions ...

Variation Rolls the Dice

Variation Rolls the Dice: A worldwide collage in honour of Salikoko S. Mufwene aims to celebrate Mufwene’s ground-breaking contribution to linguistics in the past four decades. The title also encapsulates his approach to language as both systemic and socio-cultural practices, and the role of variation in determining particular evolutionary trajectories in specific linguistic ecologies. The book therefore focuses on variation within and across languages, within and across speakers, and how this fundamental aspect of human behavior can affect language structure in time and space. Mufwene has been instrumental in putting creole languages on the map of General Linguistics and connecting their analysis to issues of language acquisition, multilingualism, language contact, language evolution, and language typology. Thanks to the diversity of topics and the wide-ranging theoretical persuasions of the contributors, this volume aims at a large readership including both scholars and advanced students interested in cutting-edge research in the aforementioned domains.

Grammar Complexity

Jäger, Andreas (2006), Typology of Periphrastic 'Do' Constructions (Bochum: Brockmeyer). Jäger, Gerhard (2002), “Some notes on the formal properties of bidirectional optimality theory,” Journal of Logic, Language, and Information, ...

Grammar   Complexity

This book combines ideas about the architecture of grammar and language acquisition, processing, and change to explain why languages show regular patterns when there is so much irregularity in their use and so much complexity when there is such regularity in linguistic phenomena. Peter Culicover argues that the structure of language can be understood and explained in terms of two kinds of complexity: firstly that of the correspondence between form and meaning; secondly in the real-time processes involved in the construction of meanings in linguistic expressions. Mainstream generative theory is based on inherent linguistic competence and on the regularities within and across languages, with the exceptional aspects of any language frequently put to one side. But a language's irregular and unique features offer, the author argues, fundamental insights into both the nature of language and the way it is produced and understood. Peter Culicover's new book offers a pertinent and original contribution to key current debates in linguistic theory. It will interest scholars and advanced students of linguists of all theoretical persuasions.

Studies on Grammaticalization

http://hdl.handle.net/2123/111 2006 Typology of Periphrastic 'do'-Constructions. Bochum: Brockmeyer. Jaggar, Philip J. 2001 Hausa. Amsterdam: Benjamins. Kuteva, Tania 2001 Auxiliation: An Enquiry into the Nature of Grammaticalization.

Studies on Grammaticalization

Grammaticalization theory has played a major role in the developments in language typology and functional linguistics during the last three decades. Grammaticalization phenomena show that grammars evolve in a continuous way following cross-linguistically established diachronic paths. The contributions in this book shed new light on some central issues in grammaticalization theory such as the (uni-)directionality debate, the relation between grammaticalization and constructions, and the concept of multiple grammaticalization. Evidence for grammaticalization in several domains of grammar is presented: adpositions, numeral classifiers, honorifics, agreement markers, applicatives, reciprocals, delexical verbs, auxiliaries, relative clauses, and discourse particles. The empirical investigations come from several languages, among them many understudied languages such as Nanafwe, Maltese, Manambu, Chibchan and Siouan languages.

Verbal Periphrases in a Functional Grammar of Spanish

which as a lexical verb can never occur with por + infinitive; this construction pattern is exclusively periphrastic. Schematically, this typology can be represented as follows: Partial Periphrases with non-periphrastic homonym Full ...

Verbal Periphrases in a Functional Grammar of Spanish


The Typology of Adjectival Predication

The term “predicative adjectival construction” is chosen because expressions which conform to the definition given above will typically involve the use of adjectivals which are commonly considered to be syntactically “predicative”, ...

The Typology of Adjectival Predication

The series is a platform for contributions of all kinds to this rapidly developing field. General problems are studied from the perspective of individual languages, language families, language groups, or language samples. Conclusions are the result of a deepened study of empirical data. Special emphasis is given to little-known languages, whose analysis may shed new light on long-standing problems in general linguistics.

Split Possession

Language typology and language universals / Sprachtypologie und sprachliche Universalien / La typologie des langues et les universaux linguistiques . Vol . ... Typology of periphrastic do ' - constructions ( Diversitas Linguarum 12 ] .

Split Possession

This book is a functional-typological study of possession splits in European languages. It shows that genetically and structurally diverse languages such as Icelandic, Welsh, and Maltese display possessive systems which are sensitive to semantically based distinctions reminiscent of the alienability correlation. These distinctions are grammatically relevant in many European languages because they require dedicated constructions. What makes these split possessive systems interesting for the linguist is the interaction of semantic criteria with pragmatics and syntax. Neutralisation of distinctions occurs under focus. The same happens if one of the constituents of a possessive construction is syntactically heavy. These effects can be observed in the majority of the 50 sample languages. Possessive splits are strong in those languages which are outside the Standard Average European group. The bulk of the European languages do not behave much differently from those non-European languages for which possession splits are reported. The book reveals interesting new facts about European languages and possession to typologists, universals researchers, and areal linguists.

Italian Dialectology at the Interfaces

Typology and universals of personal pronouns. In Universals of Human Language, Vol. III, Joseph H. Greenberg (ed.), 213–248. Stanford CA: Stanford University Press. Jäger, Andreas. 2006. Typology of Periphrastic 'do'-Constructions.

Italian Dialectology at the Interfaces

Recent years have seen a growing interest in linguistic phenomena whose formal manifestation and underlying licensing conditions represent the convergence of two or more areas of the grammar, an area of investigation particularly invigorated in recent generative research by developments such as phase theory (cf. Chomsky 2001; 2008) and the cartographic enterprise (cf. Rizzi 1997; Cinque 1999). In this respect, the dialects of Italy are no exception, in that they present comparative Romance linguists and theoretical linguists alike with many valuable opportunities to study the linguistic interfaces, as highlighted by the many case studies presented in this volume which provide a series of original insights into how different components of the linguistic system – syntactic, phonetic, phonological, morphological, semantic and pragmatic – do not necessarily operate in isolation but, rather, interact to license phenomena whose nature and distribution can only be fully understood in terms of the formal mapping between the interfaces.

A Contrastive Grammar of Brazilian Pomeranian

In Die deutsche Präsenz in den USA/The German presence in the U.S.A. Jan Wirrer & Josef Raab (eds), 627–641. Berlin: LITVerlag. Jäger, Andreas. 2006. Typology of periphrastic do-constructions [Diversitas Linguarum 12] Bochum: ...

A Contrastive Grammar of Brazilian Pomeranian

Pomeranian is the West Germanic language spoken by European emigrants who went from Farther Pomerania (present-day Poland) to Brazil in the period 1857–1887. This language is no longer spoken in cohesive societies in Europe, but the language has survived and is in remarkably good shape on this language island in the tropical state of Espirito Santo. This monograph offers the first synchronic grammar of this language. After a historical introduction, the book offers a systematic description of its phonology, morphology and syntax. The language is contrasted with its European sisters, more particularly High German, Dutch, and Frisian. It highlights various phenomena that will presumably contribute to the ongoing theoretical debate on the Germanic verbal system. It provides new data on cluster V2, do-support, and the two infinitives. As to the infinitival syntax, the language shows remarkable parallels to the system of Frisian. As to the rich Pomeranian system of subtractive morphology, the phonological account that is offered, will be important for the ongoing discussion of the abstractness of phonological representations. Finally, Pomeranian is a welcome addition to the set of languages on which our etymological understanding of West Germanic is based.

Verbal Periphrasis in Ancient Greek Have and Be Constructions

Typology of periphrastic 'do' constructions. Bochum: Brockmeyer. James, P. 2008. Complementary participles and infinitives with verbs of perception and declaration in the Roman and Byzantine documentary papyri.

Verbal Periphrasis in Ancient Greek Have  and Be  Constructions

Verbal Periphrasis in Ancient Greek offers a systematic investigation of periphrastic constructions with the verbs 'to be' and 'to have' based on an extensive corpus of texts, ranging from the eighth century BC to the eighth century AD. It clarifies the notions of 'verbal periphrasis' and 'adjectival periphrasis' from a theoretical point of view, offering a broad introduction to a selection of recent advancements in linguistics.

The Oxford Handbook of Inflection

The problem of establishing a typology of periphrasis is hampered by the dearth of crosslinguistic comparisons of the ... of various types of periphrastic perfect in order to determine when we can reliably describe the construction as ...

The Oxford Handbook of Inflection

This is the latest addition to a group of handbooks covering the field of morphology, alongside The Oxford Handbook of Case (2008), The Oxford Handbook of Compounding (2009), and The Oxford Handbook of Derivational Morphology (2014). It provides a comprehensive state-of-the-art overview of work on inflection - the expression of grammatical information through changes in word forms. The volume's 24 chapters are written by experts in the field from a variety of theoretical backgrounds, with examples drawn from a wide range of languages. The first part of the handbook covers the fundamental building blocks of inflectional form and content: morphemes, features, and means of exponence. Part 2 focuses on what is arguably the most characteristic property of inflectional systems, paradigmatic structure, and the non-trivial nature of the mapping between function and form. The third part deals with change and variation over time, and the fourth part covers computational issues from a theoretical and practical standpoint. Part 5 addresses psycholinguistic questions relating to language acquisition and neurocognitive disorders. The final part is devoted to sketches of individual inflectional systems, illustrating a range of typological possibilities across a genetically diverse set of languages from Africa, Asia and the Pacific, Australia, Europe, and South America.

Changing Valency

(iii) Periphrastic causatives do not have the intonational properties of a monoverbal clause; a pausal marker can be ... mechanisms: morphological causatives, serial causative constructions and two types of periphrastic causatives.

Changing Valency

Distinguished scholars examine the phenomena of passives and causatives in languages from around the world.

Perfects in Indo European Languages and Beyond

In Hittite, imperfectivity can be expressed by the so-called iterative suffix -ške/a- that has been shown to behave ... 2.1 Typology of periphrastic constructions According to Haspelmath (2000: 660), a “periphrastic expression is simply ...

Perfects in Indo European Languages and Beyond

This volume provides a detailed investigation of perfects from all the branches of the Indo-European language family, in some cases representing the first ever comprehensive description. Thorough philological examinations result in empirically well-founded analyses illustrated with over 940 examples. The unique temporal depth and diatopic breadth of attested Indo-European languages permits the investigation of both TAME (Tense-Aspect-Mood-Evidentiality) systems over time and recurring cycles of change, as well as synchronic patterns of areal distribution and contact phenomena. These possibilities are fully exploited in the volume. Furthermore, the cross-linguistic perspective adopted by many authors, as well as the inclusion of contributions which go beyond the boundaries of the Indo-European family per se, facilitates typological comparison. As such, the volume is intended to serve as a springboard for future research both into the semantics of the perfect in Indo-European itself, and verb systems across the world’s languages.

English Historical Linguistics 2006

Areal and typological evidence Wagner (1959) can be considered a forerunner of an areal-typological approach, ... viz. periphrastic 'do'; Vennemann (2002), who discusses the so-called internal possessor construction from the same kind ...

English Historical Linguistics 2006

The papers collected in this volume were first presented at the 14th International Conference on English Historical Linguistics (Bergamo, 2006). Alongside studies of syntax, morphology, lexis and semantics, published in two sister volumes, many innovative contributions focused on geo-historical variation in English. A carefully peer-reviewed selection, including two plenary lectures, appears here in print for the first time, bearing witness to the increasing scholarly interest in varieties of English other than so-called 'standard' English. In all the contributions, well-established methods of historical dialectology combine with new theoretical approaches, in an attempt to shed more light on phenomena that have hitherto remained unexplored, or have only just begun to be investigated. Perceptual dialectology is also taken into consideration, and state-of-the-art tools, such as electronic corpora and atlases, are employed consistently, ensuring the methodological homogeneity of the contributions.