Unweaving the Rainbow

In this illuminating and provocative book, Richard Dawkins argues that Keats could not have been more mistaken, and shows how an understanding of science enhances our wonder of the world.

Unweaving the Rainbow

A dazzling, passionate polemic against anti-science movements of all kinds. Keats accused Newton of destroying the poetry of the rainbow by explaining the origin of its colours. In this illuminating and provocative book, Richard Dawkins argues that Keats could not have been more mistaken, and shows how an understanding of science enhances our wonder of the world. He argues that mysteries do not lose their poetry because they are solved: the solution is often more beautiful than the puzzle, uncovering even deeper mysteries. Dawkins takes up the most important and compelling topics in modern science, from astronomy and genetics to language and virtual reality, combining them in a landmark statement on the human appetite for wonder.

Color for Philosophers

This work on colour features a chapter, 'Further Thoughts: 1993', in which the author revisits the dispute between colour objectivists and subjectivists from the perspective of the ecology, genetics, and evolution of colour vision.

Color for Philosophers

Awarded the 1986 Johnsonian Prize in Philosophy. This work on colour features a chapter, 'Further Thoughts: 1993', in which the author revisits the dispute between colour objectivists and subjectivists from the perspective of the ecology, genetics, and evolution of colour vision.

Unweaving the Rainbow

Unweaving the Rainbow

From the New York Times–bestselling author of Science in the Soul. “If any recent writing about science is poetic, it is this” (The Wall Street Journal). Did Sir Isaac Newton “unweave the rainbow” by reducing it to its prismatic colors, as John Keats contended? Did he, in other words, diminish beauty? Far from it, says acclaimed scientist Richard Dawkins; Newton’s unweaving is the key too much of modern astronomy and to the breathtaking poetry of modern cosmology. Mysteries don’t lose their poetry because they are solved: the solution often is more beautiful than the puzzle, uncovering deeper mysteries. With the wit, insight, and spellbinding prose that have made him a bestselling author, Dawkins takes up the most important and compelling topics in modern science, from astronomy and genetics to language and virtual reality, combining them in a landmark statement of the human appetite for wonder. This is the book Dawkins was meant to write: A brilliant assessment of what science is (and isn’t), a tribute to science not because it is useful but because it is uplifting. “A love letter to science, an attempt to counter the perception that science is cold and devoid of aesthetic sensibility . . . Rich with metaphor, passionate arguments, wry humor, colorful examples, and unexpected connections, Dawkins’ prose can be mesmerizing.” —San Francisco Chronicle “Brilliance and wit.” —The New Yorker

Color and Culture

6 • Unweaving the Rainbow From Titian to Testa □ The Romantics □ Prismatics and harmony Twentieth-century epilogue Rainbows ,md what caused them had been subjects for investigation . . . Do not all charms fly At the mere touch of cold ...

Color and Culture

An encyclopaedic work on color in Western art and culture from the Middle Ages to Post-Modernism.

Unweaving the Rainbow

Unweaving the Rainbow


Jesus Was a Liberal

50. Ibid., p. 285. 51. Thomas J. S. Mikelson, "Wake, Now, My Senses," in Singing the Living Tradition (Boston: Beacon Press, 1993), 298. 52. Dawkins, The God Delusion, pp. 1-3. 53. Richard Dawkins, Unweaving the Rainbow: Science, ...

Jesus Was a Liberal

For the millions of people who identify as liberal Christians. In McLennan's bold call to reclaim ownership of Christianity, he advocates a sense of religion based not on doctrinal readings of scripture but on the humanity behind Christ's teachings. He addresses such topics as intelligent design, abortion, same sex marriage, war. torture and much, much more. As he says in the Preface, "We liberal Christians know in our hearts that there is much more to life than seems to meet the rational eye of atheists; yet we find it hard to support supernatural claims about religion that fly in the face of scientific evidence."

The Greatest Inventions of the Past 2 000 Years

Spectroscopy is unweaving the rainbow on a grand scale. If Keats had known what Newton's unweaving would lead to — the expansion of our human vision, inspired by the expanding universe — he surely would not have drunk that toast.

The Greatest Inventions of the Past 2 000 Years

The responses of some of the world's leading scientists and creative thinkers vary from the computer to the eraser, from movable type to classical music, from the lens to counting systems, from the concepts of free will to democracy.

Consecrating Science

Philip Fisher, Wonder, the Rainbow, and the Aesthetics of Rare Experiences (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2003), 11. 12. Ibid., 16. 13. Richard Dawkins, Unweaving the Rainbow (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1998), xi. 14.

Consecrating Science

"In Consecrating Science, Lisa Sideris offers a searing critique of 'The New Cosmology,' a complex network of overlapping movements that claim to bring together science and spirituality, all in the name of saving our planet from impending ecological collapse. Highly regarded in many academic circles, these movements have been endorsed by numerous prominent scholars, scientists, historians, and educators. Their express goal--popularized in numerous books, films, TED talks, YouTube videos, podcasts, and even introductory courses at places like Harvard or Washington University--is to instill in readers and audiences a profound sense of being at home in the universe, thereby fostering environmentally responsible behavior. Whether promoted as 'The New Story,' 'The Universe Story,' or 'The Epic of Evolution,' they all offer humanity a new sacred story, a common creation myth for modern times and for all people: the evolutionary unfolding of the universe from the Big Bang to the present. Evolutionary science and religious cosmology--together at last! But as Sideris shows, however, the New Cosmology actually underwrites a staggeringly anthropocentric vision of the world. Instead of cultivating an ethic of respect for nature, the project of 'consecrating science' only increases human arrogance and indifference to nonhuman life. Going back to the work of Rachel Carson and other naturalists, the author shows how a sense of wonder, rooted in the natural world and our own ethical impulses, helps foster environmental attitudes and policies that protect our planet"--Provided by publishe

Unweaving the Rainbow

Investigates the growing field of sci-art collaborations, talking to funding bodies, scientists, artists and collaborators, examining the theory and practice behind this new frontier in arts practice.

Unweaving the Rainbow

Investigates the growing field of sci-art collaborations, talking to funding bodies, scientists, artists and collaborators, examining the theory and practice behind this new frontier in arts practice.

The Illustrated Magic of Reality

Addresses key scientific questions previously explained by rich mythologies, from the evolution of the first humans and the life cycle of stars to the principles of a rainbow and the origins of the universe.

The Illustrated Magic of Reality

Addresses key scientific questions previously explained by rich mythologies, from the evolution of the first humans and the life cycle of stars to the principles of a rainbow and the origins of the universe.

Unweaving the Rainbow

Unweaving the Rainbow


The Magic of Reality

The best-selling author of The God Delusion and the artist of such award-winning graphic novels as Wizard and Glass address key scientific questions previously explained by rich mythologies, from the evolution of the first humans and the ...

The Magic of Reality

The best-selling author of The God Delusion and the artist of such award-winning graphic novels as Wizard and Glass address key scientific questions previously explained by rich mythologies, from the evolution of the first humans and the life cycle of stars to the principles of a rainbow and the origins of the universe. 150,000 first printing.

Scientific Theology Reality

In his Unweaving the Rainbow — the title of which is derived from Keats' poem - Dawkins makes it clear that he regards this as typical anti-scientific nonsense, resting on the flimsiest of foundations. A good dose of scientific thinking ...

Scientific Theology  Reality

The second volume of an extended and systematic exploration of the relation between Christian theology and the natural sciences, focussing on the examination and defense of theological realism

Genius At Play

I sort of thought to myself, That's another rainbow; I must remember which side is red and which side is blue. ... Richard Dawkins wrote a book before he wrote The God Delusion called Unweaving the Rainbow. Now, this title is taken from ...

Genius At Play

Winner of the 2017 JPBM Communications Award for Expository and Popular Books. “A delightful meta-biography--playful indeed--of a brilliant iconoclast.” --James Gleick, author of The Information John Horton Conway is a singular mathematician with a lovely loopy brain. He is Archimedes, Mick Jagger, Salvador Dali, and Richard Feynman all rolled into one--he boasts a rock star's charisma, a slyly bent sense of humor, a polymath's promiscuous curiosity, and an insatiable compulsion to explain everything about the world to everyone in it. At Cambridge, Conway wrestled with "Monstrous Moonshine," discovered the aptly named surreal numbers, and invented the cult classic Game of Life--more than just a cool fad, Life demonstrates how simplicity generates complexity and provides an analogy for mathematics and the entire universe. As a "mathemagician" at Princeton, he used ropes, dice, pennies, coat hangers, even the occasional Slinky, as props to extend his winning imagination and share his many nerdish delights. He granted Roberts full access to his idiosyncrasies and intellect both, though not without the occasional grumble: "Oh hell," he'd say. "You're not going to put that in the book. Are you?!?"

Gaither s Dictionary of Scientific Quotations

Unweaving the Rainbow: Science, Delusion and the Appetitefor Wonder Preface (p. x) Houghton Mifflin Company. Boston, Massachusetts, USA. 1998 The fact that we slowly apprehend our world, rather than suddenly discover it, ...

Gaither s Dictionary of Scientific Quotations

This unprecedented collection of 27,000 quotations is the most comprehensive and carefully researched of its kind, covering all fields of science and mathematics. With this vast compendium you can readily conceptualize and embrace the written images of scientists, laymen, politicians, novelists, playwrights, and poets about humankind's scientific achievements. Approximately 9000 high-quality entries have been added to this new edition to provide a rich selection of quotations for the student, the educator, and the scientist who would like to introduce a presentation with a relevant quotation that provides perspective and historical background on his subject. Gaither's Dictionary of Scientific Quotations, Second Edition, provides the finest reference source of science quotations for all audiences. The new edition adds greater depth to the number of quotations in the various thematic arrangements and also provides new thematic categories.

Dawkins Gotteswahn

Argument # 3 : Beware of all questions that are not biological questions . In Unweaving the Rainbow Dawkins writes : Gould's eternally unresolved questions in paleontology are three in number : Does time have a directional arrow ...

Dawkins  Gotteswahn


Believing in Dawkins

After that comes I think his most philosophically interesting book: Unweaving the Rainbow. Unweaving the Rainbow is a fascinating meditation on the value and meaning of science. But Unweaving the Rainbow does far more than discuss these ...

Believing in Dawkins

Dawkin's militant atheism is well known; his profound faith less well known In this book, atheist philosopher Eric Steinhart explores the spiritual dimensions of Richard Dawkins’ books, which are shown to encompass: · the meaning and purpose of life · an appreciation of Platonic beauty and truth · a deep belief in the rationality of the universe · an aversion to both scientism and nihilism As an atheist, Dawkins strives to develop a scientific alternative to theism, and while he declares that science is not a religion, he also proclaims it to be a spiritual enterprise. His books are filled with fragmentary sketches of this ‘spiritual atheism’, resembling a great unfinished cathedral. This book systematises and completes Dawkins’ arguments and reveals their deep roots in Stoicism and Platonism. Expanding on Dawkins’ ideas, Steinhart shows how atheists can develop powerful ethical principles, compelling systems of symbols and images, and meaningful personal and social practices. Believing in Dawkins is a rigorous and potent entreaty for the use of science and reason to support spiritually rich and optimistic ways of thinking and living.

The Order of Things

The very slight historical evidence that Dawkins brings forward in support of his extravagant excoriation of religious visions of reality, whether in Unweaving the Rainbow or elsewhere, amounts to little more than an observation that ...

The Order of Things

Provocative and immensely well informed, The Order of Things represents a substantial and original contribution to the fields of systematic theology, historical theology, and the science and religion dialogue. Leading theologian, Alister E. McGrath explores how the working methods and assumptions of the natural sciences can be used to inform and stimulate systematic theology. Written by one of today's best-known Christian writers Explores how the working methods and assumptions of the natural sciences can be used to inform and stimulate systematic theology Continues McGrath’s acclaimed exploration of scientific theology, begun with his groundbreaking three-volume work, A Scientific Theology Includes a landmark extended analysis of whether doctrinal development can be explained using Darwinian evolutionary models, and exploration of how the transition from a “scientific theology” to a future “scientific dogmatics” might be made Supported by a published review of McGrath’s scientific theology project, which is currently the best brief introduction to his thought.