Uprooting and Integration in the Writings of Simone Weil

Uprooting and Integration in the Writings of Simone Weil

This interdisciplinary study reviews the entirety of Simone Weil's writings on philosophy, history, science, religion, language, folklore and literature in order to give a total perspective of Weil's extensive contributions to twentieth-century thought. In each of these fields, the forces of uprooting and integration move towards a resolution of the problem of estrangement. The extent of Weil's study of the problem of alienation has long been underestimated and so has the value of her contributions. Among these were her role in the formulation of modern existentialist philosophies, her involvement with the crisis of determinism and her refusal of discontinuous forms of probability that had led to quantum mechanics, her denunciation of colonial policies and the bureaucratization of power and labor, and her search for original meaning in language, mythology and poetic expression. This study is an exploration of each of these areas in Weil's writings and the contribution of each to the dialectical power of the forces of uprooting and integration.

A Philosophical Anthropology Drawn from Simone Weil's Life and Writings

A Philosophical Anthropology Drawn from Simone Weil's Life and Writings

A Philosophical Anthropology Drawn from Simone Weil’s Life & Writings situates Weil’s thought in the time between the two world wars through which she lived, and traces Weil’s consistent conception of a mind-body dualism in the Cartesian sense to a dualism that places the mind within a carnal part of the soul and establishes an eternal part of the soul as the essence of human beings. Helen Cullen argues that in Weil’s early conception of human nature, her Cartesian conception of perception already shows a glimpse of the eternal. Weil’s dualistic conception also forms the basis of her political analysis of the left of her time, and through working in factories and in the fields, she develops a conception of labour as a theory of “action” and “work with a method.” Weil was influenced by leading thinkers of her time, prompting her to do an analysis of current scientific theories. Cullen argues that Weil’s analysis of Christianity, already present in Greek philosophy, shows us a theory of “identical thought” inherited from the East (India and China) and brought forth by peoples around Israel. This theory leads to Weil’s analysis, developed in The Need for Roots, of how we’ve been uprooted through colonization and how we can grow roots in a free local society (both rural and urban).

French XX Bibliography

Critical and Biographical References for the Study of French Literature Since 1885

French XX Bibliography

This series of bibliographical references is one of the most important tools for research in modern and contemporary French literature. No other bibliography represents the scholarly activities and publications of these fields as completely.

Women's Political & Social Thought

An Anthology

Women's Political & Social Thought

"... a wide array of time periods, cultures, and formats... " --Library Journal The first collection of source readings of women's important writings in political and social theory from ancient times to the twentieth century. From Sappho of Lesbos to Mary Wollstonecraft and from Jane Addams to Simone Weil, these works fill a major gap in materials available for teaching the history of political thought and opens paths for exploring the rich and diverse contributions of women as creators of theory.