Verse and Poetics in George Herbert and John Donne

This book is an important contribution to the ongoing scholarly dialogue about the nature of literary and cultural study of early modern England, and about the relationship between the writer and the world.

Verse and Poetics in George Herbert and John Donne

Innovative and highly readable, this study traces George Herbert's and John Donne's development of a distinct poetics through close readings of their poems, references to their letters, sermons, and prose treatises, and to other contemporary poets and theorists. In demonstrating a relationship between poetics and religious consciousness in Donne's and Herbert's verse, Frances Cruickshank explores their attitudes to the cultural, theological, and aesthetic enterprise of writing and reading verse. Cruickshank shows that Donne and Herbert regarded poetry as a mode not determined by its social and political contexts, but as operating in and on them with its own distinct set of aesthetic and intellectual values, and that ultimately, verse mattered as a privileged mode of religious discourse. This book is an important contribution to the ongoing scholarly dialogue about the nature of literary and cultural study of early modern England, and about the relationship between the writer and the world. Cruickshank confirms Donne's reputation as a fascinating and brilliant poetic figure while simultaneously rousing interest in Herbert by noting his unique merging of rusticity and urbanity and tranquility and uncertainty, allowing the reader to enter into these poets' imaginative worlds and to understand the literary genre they embraced and then transformed.

Comparative Essays on the Poetry and Prose of John Donne and George Herbert

This book brings together ten essays on John Donne and George Herbert composed by an international group of scholars.

Comparative Essays on the Poetry and Prose of John Donne and George Herbert

This book brings together ten essays on John Donne and George Herbert composed by an international group of scholars. The volume represents the first collection of its kind to draw close connections between these two distinguished early modern thinkers and poets who are justly coupled because of their personal and artistic association. The contributors' distinctive new approaches and insights illuminate a variety of topics and fields while suggesting new directions that future study of Donne and Herbert might take. Some chapters explore concrete instances of collaboration or communication between Donne and Herbert, and others find fresh ways to contextualize the Donnean and Herbertian lyric, carefully setting the poetry alongside discourses of apophatic theology or early modern political theory, while still others link Herbert's verse to Donne's devotional prose. Several chapters establish specific theological and aesthetic grounds for comparison, considering Donne and Herbert's respective positions on religious assurance, comic sensibility, and virtuosity with poetic endings.

Comparative Essays on the Poetry and Prose of John Donne and George Herbert

For other brief accounts of the biographical and creative links between Donne and Herbert, see Cruickshank, Verse and Poetics, 8–11 and 13, and John Drury, Music at Midnight: The Life and Poetry of George Herbert (Chicago: University of ...

Comparative Essays on the Poetry and Prose of John Donne and George Herbert

This book brings together ten essays on John Donne and George Herbert composed by an international group of scholars. The volume represents the first collection of its kind to draw close connections between these two distinguished early modern poet-thinkers. The contributors illuminate a variety of topics and fields while suggestion new directions that future study of Donne and Herbert might take.

The Variorum Edition of the Poetry of John Donne

Verse and Poetics in George Herbert and John Donne. Farnham, Surrey and Burlington, VT: Ashgate. Crum, Margaret. 1961. “Notes on the Physical Characteristics of some Manuscripts of the Poems of Donne and of Henry King.

The Variorum Edition of the Poetry of John Donne

Based on an exhaustive study of the manuscripts and printed editions in which these poems have appeared, the eighth in the series of The Variorum Edition of the Poetry of John Donne presents newly edited critical texts of thirteen Divine Poems and details the genealogical history of each poem, accompanied by a thorough prose discussion. Arranged chronologically within sections, the material is organized under the following headings: Dates and Circumstances; General Commentary; Genre; Language, Versification, and Style; the Poet/Persona; and Themes. The volume also offers a comprehensive digest of general and topical commentary on the Divine Poems from Donne's time through 2012.

Scripture and the English Poetic Imagination

George R. Potter and Evelyn M. Simpson, eds., The Sermons of John Donne, 10 vols. ... A good in-depth study is Frances Cruickshank, Verse and Poetics in George Herbert and John Donne (London: Routledge, 2016).

Scripture and the English Poetic Imagination

The God of the Bible often speaks in poetry. Beginning with an illuminating exploration of eloquence in the divine voice, a highly acclaimed professor of literature opens up the treasury of biblical tradition among English poets both past and present, showing them to be well attuned not only to Scripture's meaning but also to its music. In exploring the work of various poets, David Lyle Jeffrey demonstrates how the poetry of the Bible affords a register of understanding in which the beauty of Holy Scripture deepens meditation on its truth and is indeed a vital part of that truth.

Eucharist and the Poetic Imagination in Early Modern England

Cruickshank, Frances, Verse and Poetics in George Herbert and john Donne (Farnham: Ashgate, 2010). Cuming, G.J., A History of Anglican Liturgy, 2nd edn (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1982). Cummings, Brian, The Literary Culture of the ...

Eucharist and the Poetic Imagination in Early Modern England

The Reformation changed forever how the sacrament of the Eucharist was understood. This study of six canonical early modern lyric poets traces the literary afterlife of what was one of the greatest doctrinal shifts in English history. Sophie Read argues that the move from a literal to a figurative understanding of the phrase 'this is my body' exerted a powerful imaginative pull on successive generations. To illustrate this, she examines in detail the work of Southwell, Donne, Herbert, Crashaw, Vaughan and Milton, who between them represent a broad range of doctrinal and confessional positions, from the Jesuit Southwell to Milton's heterodox Puritanism. Individually, each chapter examines how Eucharistic ideas are expressed through a particular rhetorical trope; together, they illuminate the continued importance of the Eucharist's transformation well into the seventeenth century - not simply as a matter of doctrine, but as a rhetorical and poetic mode.

The Form of Love

9; Stein, George Herbert's Lyrics (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1968), 200; Stewart, “Time and The Temple,” 104; and Cruickshank, Verse and Poetics in George Herbert and John Donne (Burlington: Ashgate, 2010), 78. 55.

The Form of Love

Can poetry articulate something about love that philosophy cannot? The Form of Love argues that it can. In close readings of seven “metaphysical” poems, the book shows how poets of the early modern period and beyond use poetic form to turn philosophy to other ends, in order not to represent the truth about love but to create a virtual experience of love, in all its guises. The Form of Love shows how verse creates love that can’t exist without poetry’s specific affordances, and how poems can, in their impossibility, prompt love’s radical re-imagining. Like the philosophies on which they draw, metaphysical poems imagine love as an intense form of non-sovereignty, of giving up control. They even imagine love as a liberating bondage—to a friend, a beloved, a saint, a God, or a garden. Yet these poems create strange, striking versions of such love, made in, rather than through, the devices, structures, and forces where love appears. Tracing how poems think, Kuzner argues, requires an intimate form of reading: close—even too close—attention to and thinking with the text. Showing how poetry thinks of love otherwise than other fields, the book reveals how poetry and philosophy can nevertheless enter into a relation that is itself like love.

The Oxford Handbook of the Bible in Early Modern England c 1530 1700

that Herbert does not believe that the Bible's modes of making meaning are separate from his poetry, once biblical verses are ... and Frances Cruikshank, Verse and Poetics in George Herbert and John Donne (Farnham: Ashgate, 2010), 21.

The Oxford Handbook of the Bible in Early Modern England  c  1530 1700

The Bible was, by any measure, the most important book in early modern England. It preoccupied the scholarship of the era, and suffused the idioms of literature and speech. Political ideas rode on its interpretation and deployed its terms. It was intricately related to the project of natural philosophy. And it was central to daily life at all levels of society from parliamentarian to preacher, from the 'boy that driveth the plough', famously invoked by Tyndale, to women across the social scale. It circulated in texts ranging from elaborate folios to cheap catechisms; it was mediated in numerous forms, as pictures, songs, and embroideries, and as proverbs, commonplaces, and quotations. Bringing together leading scholars from a range of fields, The Oxford Handbook of the Bible in Early Modern England, 1530-1700 explores how the scriptures served as a generative motor for ideas, and a resource for creative and political thought, as well as for domestic and devotional life. Sections tackle the knotty issues of translation, the rich range of early modern biblical scholarship, Bible dissemination and circulation, the changing political uses of the Bible, literary appropriations and responses, and the reception of the text across a range of contexts and media. Where existing scholarship focuses, typically, on Tyndale and the King James Bible of 1611, The Oxford Handbook of the Bible in England, 1530-1700 goes further, tracing the vibrant and shifting landscape of biblical culture in the two centuries following the Reformation.

George Herbert

This is not only an authoritative study of the poet himself but a notable contribution to the problem, so keenly discussed today, of religious belief in relation to poetry.

George Herbert

George Herbert has for centuries been admired by the religious for his piety and by lovers of poetry for his language and his wit. In the present volume, Professor Summers seeks to abolish this dualism of approach: he is concerned throughout to demonstrate Herbert’s religion as it is expressed in his poems, and to interpret the poems in the light of his religion, for they are a “picture” of meticulously observed spiritual experience. He gives us a scholarly, lucid, and integrated study of a much-loved poet, who was at once a good man, a profound Christian thinker, and a most daring experimentalist in the craft of verse. Professor Summers charts the many currents and cross-currents of early seventeenth century religious thought that affected Herbert, traces the stages of the poet’s life, and then proceeds to a thorough examination of the form and content of his work. There are interesting chapters on his metrical “counterpoint,” his dramatic-colloquial style, and the influence of music upon his poetry. This is not only an authoritative study of the poet himself but a notable contribution to the problem, so keenly discussed today, of religious belief in relation to poetry.

George Herbert

The Collected Critical Heritage set will be available as a set of 68 volumes and the series will also be available in mini sets selected by period (in slipcase boxes) and as individual volumes.

George Herbert

First Published in 1995. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Sacramental Poetics at the Dawn of Secularism

... 1978) have demonstrated the biblical inheritance in the verse of the period. Arthur L. Clements's Poetry of Contemplation: John Donne, George Herbert, Henry Vaughan, and the Modern Period (Albany: State University of New York Press, ...

Sacramental Poetics at the Dawn of Secularism

Sacramental Poetics at the Dawn of Secularism asks what happened when the world was shaken by challenges to the sacred order as people had known it, an order that regulated both their actions and beliefs. When Reformers gave up the doctrine of transubstantiation (even as they held onto revised forms of the Eucharist), they lost a doctrine that infuses all materiality, spirituality, and signification with the presence of God. That presence guaranteed the cleansing of human fault, the establishment of justice, the success of communication, the possibility of union with God and another, and love. These longings were not lost but displaced, Schwartz argues, onto other cultural forms in a movement from ritual to the arts, from the sacrament to the sacramental. Investigating the relationship of the arts to the sacred, Schwartz returns to the primary meaning of "sacramental" as "sign making," noting that because the sign always points beyond itself, it participates in transcendence, and this evocation of transcendence, of mystery, is the work of a sacramental poetics.

Heart in Pilgrimage

He wrote poetry throughout his life, but we only know of it now because, from his death bed, he sent the manuscript of the collection of his poems known as The Temple to his friend Nicholas Ferrar of Little Gidding.

Heart in Pilgrimage

The poet George Herbert was born in1593 and died just before his fortieth birthday in1633.While an undergraduate at Cambridge, he wrote to tell his mother that he had resolved that the poetry he wrote would always be ‘consecrated to God’s glory’. He wrote poetry throughout his life, but we only know of it now because, from his death bed, he sent the manuscript of the collection of his poems known as ‘The Temple’ to his friend Nicholas Ferrar of Little Gidding. He asked him ‘to bring that piece into the world if he thought good of it, else to burn it.’ Ferrar thought so highly of it that he said ‘he could not sufficiently admire it, as a rich Jewell, and most worthy to be in the hands and hearts of all true Christians.’ Within a few months of Herbert’s death Ferrar had had the poems published, and thirteen new editions were published during the next seventy years. Today fewer people know Herbert’s poetry. Jane Falloon has written ‘Heart in Pilgrimage’ because of her desire that it should be more widely read and appreciated by non-academic lovers of literature. New readers will be astonished by its accessibility: his sentiments and humour are so modern and immediate: they will find that poem after poem gives them a feeling of wonder, delight, recognition of genius, sheer happiness, and shock. She has chosen twenty four of her favourite poems, and has added to each of them her own appreciation and critical analysis, combining her own commentary with that of such distinguished Herbert scholars as Helen Vendler, Elizabeth Clarke, T.S.Eliot, Seamus Heaney, and Dr. Rowan Williams the Archbishop of Canterbury, to whom the book is dedicated. She has introduced this selection with chapters on the life of George Herbert, and also of his friend Nicholas Ferrar, without whose efforts these wonderful poems would have been lost to the world.

Poetry of Contemplation

John Donne, George Herbert, Henry Vaughan, and the Modern Period Arthur L. Clements. ful , was published in English Literary Renaissance , 3 ( 1973 ) , 264– 283 and reprinted in John R. Roberts ' edition of Essential Articles For The ...

Poetry of Contemplation

This is the first systematic and thorough study of mysticism or contemplation in these three seventeenth-century poets and in three modern writers. It not only clarifies the very confused issue of mysticism in seventeenth-century poetry but also connects seventeenth-century poets with modern literature and science through the contemplative tradition; from the Bible and Plato and Church fathers and important mystics of the Middle Ages through Renaissance and modern contemplatives. The transformative and redemptive power of contemplative poetry or "holy writing" (regardless of genre or discipline) is prominent throughout the book, and the relevance, indeed the vital necessity, of such poetry and of the living contemplative tradition to our apocalyptic modern world is discussed in the last chapter. In this chapter, attention is given to modern science, especially to the new physics, and to philosophical and mystical writings of eminent scientists.

The Johannine Renaissance in Early Modern English Literature and Theology

Magdalens Funerall Teares (1591), or Herbert's sacramentalist poetry, or the divine epigrams of Richard Crashaw, ... see Frances Cruickshank, Verse and Poetics in George Herbert and John Donne (Aldershot and Burlington: Ashgate ...

The Johannine Renaissance in Early Modern English Literature and Theology

The Johannine Renaissance in Early Modern English Literature and Theology argues that the Fourth Gospel and First Epistle of Saint John the Evangelist were so influential during the early modern period in England as to share with Pauline theology pride of place as leading apostolic texts on matters Christological, sacramental, pneumatological, and political. The book argues further that, in several instances, Johannine theology is more central than both Pauline theology and the Synoptic theology of Matthew, Mark, and Luke, particularly with regard to early modern polemicizing on the Trinity, distinctions between agape and eros, and the ideologies of radical dissent, especially the seventeenth-century antinomian challenge of free grace to traditional Puritan Pietism. In particular, early modern religious poetry, including works by Robert Southwell, George Herbert, John Donne, Richard Crashaw, Thomas Traherne, and Anna Trapnel, embraces a distinctive form of Johannine devotion that emphasizes the divine rather than human nature of Christ; the belief that salvation is achieved more through revelation than objective atonement and expiatory sin; a realized eschatology; a robust doctrine of assurance and comfort; and a stylistic and rhetorical approach to representing these theological features that often emulates John's mode of discipleship misunderstanding and dramatic irony. Early modern Johannine devotion assumes that religious lyrics often express a revelatory poetics that aims to clarify, typically through the use of dramatic irony, some of the deepest mysteries of the Fourth Gospel and First Epistle.

A Study Guide for George Herbert s Virtue

Metaphysical poetry is the name given to the poetry written by a loose collection of seventeenthcentury poets, including John Donne foremost as well as George Herbert, Henry Vaughan, Abraham Cowley, Richard Crashaw, and John Cleveland.

A Study Guide for George Herbert s  Virtue

A Study Guide for George Herbert's "Virtue," excerpted from Gale's acclaimed Poetry for Students. This concise study guide includes plot summary; character analysis; author biography; study questions; historical context; suggestions for further reading; and much more. For any literature project, trust Poetry for Students for all of your research needs.

The Cambridge Companion to English Poets

George. Herbert. The date 1633 is a significant one in the history of english poetry. in that year, two remarkable collections of verse were published posthumously: the poems of John Donne, and The Temple by George Herbert.

The Cambridge Companion to English Poets

This volume provides essays by twenty-nine leading scholars and critics on the best English poets from Chaucer to Larkin.

Four Metaphysical Poets

Concentrating on the major works of Dofine, Marvell, Vaughan and Herbert, Richard Willmott has provided an anthology of metaphysical verse for readers coming to the poetry for the first time.

Four Metaphysical Poets

Concentrating on the major works of Dofine, Marvell, Vaughan and Herbert, Richard Willmott has provided an anthology of metaphysical verse for readers coming to the poetry for the first time. Metaphysical poetry is notorious for its 'difficulty'; in this selection Richard Willmott provides detailed explanatory notes giving in depth information on the period, the poets and 'metaphysical style' and, to ensure a full understanding, line by line exegesis of the poems themselves is given where necessary. The anthology contains about 20-25 poems for each poet represented and a further section of other contemporary poetry which elucidates themes or approaches in the work of the four main poets in the collection and encourages readers to relate an individual poem to a broader context.

The Encyclopedia of English Renaissance Literature 3 Volume Set

SEE ALSO: Alabaster, William; Bible, the; Book of Common Prayer, the; Crashaw, Richard; Donne, John; Herbert, Edward, ... Clarke, Elizabeth (1997) Theory and theology in George Herbert's poetry: 'divinitie, and poesie, met'.

The Encyclopedia of English Renaissance Literature  3 Volume Set

Featuring entries composed by leading international scholars, The Encyclopedia of English Renaissance Literature presents comprehensive coverage of all aspects of English literature produced from the early 16th to the mid 17th centuries. Comprises over 400 entries ranging from 1000 to 5000 words written by leading international scholars Arranged in A-Z format across three fully indexed and cross-referenced volumes Provides coverage of canonical authors and their works, as well as a variety of previously under-considered areas, including women writers, broadside ballads, commonplace books, and other popular literary forms Biographical material on authors is presented in the context of cutting-edge critical discussion of literary works. Represents the most comprehensive resource available for those working in English Renaissance literary studies Also available online as part of the Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Literature, providing 24/7 access and powerful searching, browsing and cross-referencing capabilities

Gale Researcher Guide for George Herbert Simplicity and Sacred Love

These study guides provide peer-reviewed articles that allow students early success in finding scholarly materials and to gain the confidence and vocabulary needed to pursue deeper research.

Gale Researcher Guide for  George Herbert  Simplicity and Sacred Love

Gale Researcher Guide for: George Herbert: Simplicity and Sacred Love is selected from Gale's academic platform Gale Researcher. These study guides provide peer-reviewed articles that allow students early success in finding scholarly materials and to gain the confidence and vocabulary needed to pursue deeper research.