Violent Women and Sensation Fiction

This book explores ideas of violent femininity across generic and disciplinary boundaries during the nineteenth century.

Violent Women and Sensation Fiction

This book explores ideas of violent femininity across generic and disciplinary boundaries during the nineteenth century. It aims to highlight how medical, legal and literary narratives shared notions of the volatile nature of women. Mangham traces intersections between notorious legal trials, theories of female insanity, and sensation novels.

The Cambridge Companion to Sensation Fiction

Accessible and comprehensive account of the sensation novel of the nineteenth century.

The Cambridge Companion to Sensation Fiction

In 1859 the popular novelist Wilkie Collins wrote of a ghostly woman, dressed from head to toe in white garments, laying her cold, thin hand on the shoulder of a young man as he walked home late one evening. His novel The Woman in White became hugely successful and popularised a style of writing that came to be known as sensation fiction. This Companion highlights the energy, the impact and the inventiveness of the novels that were written in 'sensational' style, including the work of Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Mrs Henry Wood and Florence Marryat. It contains fifteen specially-commissioned essays and includes a chronology and a guide to further reading. Accessible yet rigorous, this Companion questions what influenced the shape and texture of the sensation novel, and what its repercussions were both in the nineteenth century and up to the present day.

Wilkie Collins

This eclectic collection brings together a range of critical voices, from varying disciplinary backgrounds, to comment on the life and works of Wilkie Collins.

Wilkie Collins

This eclectic collection brings together a range of critical voices, from varying disciplinary backgrounds, to comment on the life and works of Wilkie Collins. A close friend of Dickens, Collins engaged with some of the nineteenth century’s most influential ideas and cultural developments. As this collection makes clear, he formed interesting connections with key figures in literature, art, theatre, medicine, and the law. As a result, his works often engaged with the period’s most influential ideas and cultural developments. Best remembered for spearheading the Sensation genre with The Woman in White and detective fiction with The Moonstone, Collins’s career actually encompassed a large amount of material that has remained relatively neglected until recently. Wilkie Collins: Interdisciplinary Essays offers readings of previously unstudied sources while offering new perspectives on the author’s most canonical works.

The Poetry of Menotti Lerro

This volume presents the power of the poet’s voice in all its aching magnificence and demonstrates how it represents the sounds and rhythms of a new generation.

The Poetry of Menotti Lerro

Menotti Lerro is one of the most interesting poets of modern-day Europe. Born in a small village just outside of Salerno, Southern Italy, in 1980, he has produced an impressive range of publications, including essays, poetry, fiction, autobiography, and drama. His is a poetry concerned with powerful imagery, the physicality and vulnerability of the body, the meaning of objects, the interpretation of memories, and the philosophical importance of identity. For the first time, the rich colours and textures of Lerro’s verse are available in English. This volume presents the power of the poet’s voice in all its aching magnificence and demonstrates how it represents the sounds and rhythms of a new generation.

Victorian Sensation Fiction

As noted in the previous chapter, Mangham's study takes an interdisciplinary approach, examining the figure of the violent woman in legal, medical, and journalistic narratives, as well as in the sensation novels of Collins, Braddon, ...

Victorian Sensation Fiction


The Science of Starving in Victorian Literature Medicine and Political Economy

Providing new and historically-rich readings of the works of Charles Kingsley, Elizabeth Gaskell, and Charles Dickens, this book suggests that the realism we have come to associate with Victorian social problem fiction learned a vast amount ...

The Science of Starving in Victorian Literature  Medicine  and Political Economy

Oxford University Press Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP New Book Announcement Date 15/10/2019 Serial no. Title The Science of Starving Edition New product Subtitle Medicine, Political Economy, and the Victorian Novel Status Draft Technical Main edition ISBN 0198850034 ISBN 9780198850038 Pub. date 16/04/2020 Binding Hardback No.of vols/vol no. Price �50.00 Imprint OUP Terms AJ Bibliography No Royalty Yes Format 234x153 mm Joint IP Extent 224 pp Text colours 1 Illustrations Series/no. () Digital Formats Also available as an ebook for Retail & Institutions (Single User access) Also available online for Institutions only as part of Oxford Scholarship Online Author(s)/editor(s) Title Forename Surname Role Nationality Prof Andrew Mangham Author Affiliation Professor of Victorian Literature and Medical Humanities, University of Reading Responsible editor Jacqueline Norton Publishing History Assistant Commissioning editor Aimee Wright Agent Production editor Alannah Santra Rights Co-publisher Territorial World Original publisher Translation Available Date orig.edn pub/op Book club Available Translation? No Other sub.rights Available Orig.lang & title Classifications Main Literature Secondary Victorian literature and science Catalogue Section QB Other The Science of Starving in Victorian Literature, Medicine, and Political Economy is a reassessment of the languages and methodologies used, throughout the nineteenth century, for discussing extreme hunger in Britain. Set against the providentialism of conservative political economy, this study uncovers an emerging, dynamic way of describing literal starvation in medicine and physiology. No longer seen as a divine punishment for individual failings, starvation became, in the human sciences, a pathology whose horrific symptoms registered failings of state and statute. Providing new and historically-rich readings of the works of Charles Kingsley, Elizabeth Gaskell, and Charles Dickens, this book suggests that the realism we have come to associate with Victorian social problem fiction learned a vast amount from the empirical, materialist objectives of the medical sciences and that, within the mechanics of these intersections, we find important re-examinations of how we might think about this ongoing humanitarian issue.

A Companion to Sensation Fiction

Gilbert, Pamela K. Disease, Desire and the Body in Victorian Women's Popular Novels. ... The ManiacintheCellar: Sensation Novelsofthe 1860s. ... Violent Women and Sensation Fiction: Crime, Medicine and Victorian Popular Culture.

A Companion to Sensation Fiction

This comprehensive collection offers a complete introduction to one of the most popular literary forms of the Victorian period, its key authors and works, its major themes, and its lasting legacy. Places key authors and novels in their cultural and historical context Includes studies of major topics such as race, gender, melodrama, theatre, poetry, realism in fiction, and connections to other art forms Contributions from top international scholars approach an important literary genre from a range of perspectives Offers both a pre and post-history of the genre to situate it in the larger tradition of Victorian publishing and literature Incorporates coverage of traditional research and cutting-edge contemporary scholarship

Neo Victorianism and Sensation Fiction

“No Paste-and-scissors Version”: The Woman in White's Stage Debut. ... The Woman in White in Its Original Parts: 150th Anniversary Project. http://www.web40571.clarahost.co.uk/wilkie/etext/ ... Violent Women and Sensation Fiction.

Neo Victorianism and Sensation Fiction

This book represents the first full-length study of the relationship between neo-Victorianism and nineteenth-century sensation fiction. It examines the diverse and multiple legacies of Victorian popular fiction by authors such as Wilkie Collins and Mary Elizabeth Braddon, tracing their influence on a range of genres and works, including detective fiction, YA writing, Gothic literature, and stage and screen adaptations. In doing so, it forces a reappraisal of critical understandings of neo-Victorianism in terms of its origins and meanings, as well as offering an important critical intervention in popular fiction studies. The work traces the afterlife of Victorian sensation fiction, taking in the neo-Gothic writing of Daphne du Maurier and Victoria Holt, contemporary popular historical detective and YA fiction by authors including Elizabeth Peters and Philip Pullman, and the literary fiction of writers such as Joanne Harris and Charles Palliser. The work will appeal to scholars and students of Victorian fiction, neo-Victorianism, and popular culture alike.

The Cambridge Companion to Sensation Fiction

Mangham, Andrew, Violent Women and Sensation Fiction: Crime, Medicine and Victorian Popular Fiction. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007. Mangham, Andrew (ed.), Wilkie Collins: Interdisciplinary Essays. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars ...

The Cambridge Companion to Sensation Fiction

In 1859 the popular novelist Wilkie Collins wrote of a ghostly woman, dressed from head to toe in white garments, laying her cold, thin hand on the shoulder of a young man as he walked home late one evening. His novel The Woman in White became hugely successful and popularised a style of writing that came to be known as sensation fiction. This Companion highlights the energy, the impact and the inventiveness of the novels that were written in 'sensational' style, including the work of Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Mrs Henry Wood and Florence Marryat. It contains fifteen specially-commissioned essays and includes a chronology and a guide to further reading. Accessible yet rigorous, this Companion questions what influenced the shape and texture of the sensation novel, and what its repercussions were both in the nineteenth century and up to the present day.

Literature and Medicine

Offers an authoritative account of literature and medicine at a vital point in their emergence during the nineteenth-century.

Literature and Medicine

Offers an authoritative account of literature and medicine at a vital point in their emergence during the nineteenth-century.

The Male Body in Medicine and Literature

This interdisciplinary collection considers the tensions that have developed between the historical privilege often ascribed to the male and the vulnerabilities to which his body is prone.

The Male Body in Medicine and Literature

Contrary to what Simone de Beauvoir famously argued in 1949, men have not lived without knowing the burdens of their sex. Though men may have been elevated to cultural positions of strength and privilege, it has not been without intense scrutiny of their biological functions. Investigations of male potency and the 'ability to perform' have long been mainstays of social, political, and artistic discourse and have often provoked spirited and partisan declarations on what it means to be a man. This interdisciplinary collection considers the tensions that have developed between the historical privilege often ascribed to the male and the vulnerabilities to which his body is prone. Andrew Mangham and Daniel Lea's introduction illustrates how with the dawn of modern medicine during the Renaissance there emerged a complex set of languages for describing the male body not only as a symbol of strength, but as flesh and bone prone to illness, injury and dysfunction. Using a variety of historical and literary approaches, the essays consider the critical ways in which medicine's interactions with literature reveal vital clues about the ways sex, gender, and identity are constructed through treatments of a range of 'pathologies' including deformity, venereal disease, injury, nervousness, and sexual difference. The relationships between male medicine and ideals of potency and masculinity are searchingly explored through a broad range of sources including African American slave fictions, southern gothic, early modern poetry, Victorian literature, and the Modern novel.

Women Writing Crime Fiction 1860 1880

Andrew Mangham, Violent Women and Sensation Fiction: Crime, Medicine and Victorian Popular Culture (Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007), p. 107. 133. Slosh, in the text, is interchangeable with “Sloshy.” This naming harks to the ...

Women Writing Crime Fiction  1860  1880

Arthur Conan Doyle has long been considered the greatest writer of crime fiction, and the gender bias of the genre has foregrounded William Godwin, Edgar Allan Poe, Wilkie Collins, Émile Gaboriau and Fergus Hume. But earlier and significant contributions were being made by women in Britain, the United States and Australia between 1860 and 1880, a period that was central to the development of the genre. This work focuses on women writers of this genre and these years, including Catherine Crowe, Caroline Clive, Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Mrs. Henry (Ellen) Wood, Harriet Prescott Spofford, Louisa May Alcott, Metta Victoria Fuller Victor, Anna Katharine Green, Céleste de Chabrillan, “Oliné Keese” (Caroline Woolmer Leakey), Eliza Winstanley, Ellen Davitt, and Mary Helena Fortune—innovators who set a high standard for women writers to follow.

The Cambridge Guide to Women s Writing in English

Time , however , proves eracy , sensation fiction drew its plots from the real - life Hargrave irredeemable and ... showing cerning crimes of passion and domestic violence - e.g. an independence of purpose that at times seems the ...

The Cambridge Guide to Women s Writing in English

An alphabetized volume on women writers, major titles, movements, genres from medieval times to the present.

Affective Labour in British and American Women s Fiction 1848 1915

Borrowing elements from the Industrial novel, the Newgate novel, and the Gothic genre, sensation fiction encompassed ... violence, (inherited) madness and repressed sexual 1Andrew Mangham, Violent Women and Sensation Fiction: Crime, ...

Affective Labour in British and American Women   s Fiction  1848 1915

This volume is a comprehensive and transatlantic literary study of women’s nineteenth-and-twentieth-century fiction. Firstly, it introduces and explores the concept of women’s affective labour, and examines literary representations of this work in British and American fiction written by women between 1848 and 1915. Secondly, it revives largely ignored texts by the “scribbling women” of Britain and America, such as Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Mona Caird, and Mary Hunter Austin, and rereads established authors, such as Elizabeth Gaskell, Kate Chopin, and Edith Wharton, to demonstrate how all these works provide valuable insights into women’s lives in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Finally, by adopting the lens of affective labour, the study explores the ways in which women were portrayed as striving for self-fulfilment through forms of emotional, mental, and creative endeavours that have not always been fully appreciated as ‘work’ in critical accounts of nineteenth-and-twentieth-century fiction.

Sex Crime and Literature in Victorian England

See also A Mangham, Violent Women and Sensation Fiction: Crime, Medicine and Victorian Popular Culture (Palgrave, 2007) 5–6; Pykett, The Improper Feminine (above n 35) 30–31; and J Carnell, The Literary Lives of Mary Elizabeth Braddon: ...

Sex  Crime and Literature in Victorian England

The Victorians worried about many things, prominent among their worries being the 'condition' of England and the 'question' of its women. Sex, Crime and Literature in Victorian England revisits these particular anxieties, concentrating more closely upon four 'crimes' which generated especial concern amongst contemporaries: adultery, bigamy, infanticide and prostitution. Each engaged questions of sexuality and its regulation, legal, moral and cultural, for which reason each attracted the considerable interest not just of lawyers and parliamentarians, but also novelists and poets and perhaps most importantly those who, in ever-larger numbers, liked to pass their leisure hours reading about sex and crime. Alongside statutes such as the 1857 Matrimonial Causes Act and the 1864 Contagious Diseases Act, Sex, Crime and Literature in Victorian England contemplates those texts which shaped Victorian attitudes towards England's 'condition' and the 'question' of its women: the novels of Dickens, Thackeray and Eliot, the works of sensationalists such as Ellen Wood and Mary Braddon, and the poetry of Gabriel and Christina Rossetti. Sex, Crime and Literature in Victorian England is a richly contextual commentary on a critical period in the evolution of modern legal and cultural attitudes to the relation of crime, sexuality and the family.

Mary Elizabeth Braddon

Enthusiastic review of Braddon's novel One Thing Needful. Mangham, Andrew. Violent Women and Sensation Fiction. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave, 2007. A fascinating study of literary negotiations of the violent woman, which examines the ...

Mary Elizabeth Braddon

"Mary Elizabeth Braddon (1835-1915) penned more than eighty novels, plays, poems, essays, and short stories, and edited two magazines. This companion to Braddon's mystery fiction has entries on key figures, characters, and historical contexts in Braddon's writing, as well as illustrations, a career chronology, and a chronological and alphabetical listing of all of her works"--Provided by publisher.

Women s Authorship and Editorship in Victorian Culture

Mangham, Andrew, Violent Women and Sensation Fiction: Crime, Medicine and Victorian Popular Culture (Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007). Marshall, Gail, Actresses on the Victorian Stage: Feminine Performance and the ...

Women s Authorship and Editorship in Victorian Culture

Beth Palmer brings new perspectives to the study of sensation fiction in the Victorian period, a popular genre often involving narratives of crime and madness. By examining the self-conscious and complex ways in which Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Ellen Wood, and Florence Marryat used sensation as both authors and magazine editors she re-works the conventional perspective that sensation fiction was a hackneyed, formulaic, and limited genre. Palmer offers a new, broadercontext for the phenomenal success of works like Braddon's Lady Audley's Secret and Wood's East Lynne.The book also provides a larger context to this important relationship between sensation and the periodical by reaching back to explore the vital press conditions initiated byfigures like Charles Dickens and Mrs Beeton in the mid-nineteenth century and by looking forwards to the New Woman writers of the 1890s to understand the legacies of sensational author-editorship in the Victorian press and beyond.

The Routledge Companion to Victorian Literature

The Blackwell Companion to Sensation Fiction, edited by Pamela K. Gilbert, Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2011, pp. 67–80. Hughes, Winifred. ... Violent Women and Sensation Fiction: Crime, Medicine, and Victorian Popular Culture.

The Routledge Companion to Victorian Literature

The Routledge Companion to Victorian Literature offers 45 chapters by leading international scholars working with the most dynamic and influential political, cultural, and theoretical issues addressing Victorian literature today. Scholars and students will find this collection both useful and inspiring. Rigorously engaged with current scholarship that is both historically sensitive and theoretically informed, the Routledge Companion places the genres of the novel, poetry, and drama and issues of gender, social class, and race in conversation with subjects like ecology, colonialism, the Gothic, digital humanities, sexualities, disability, material culture, and animal studies. This guide is aimed at scholars who want to know the most significant critical approaches in Victorian studies, often written by the very scholars who helped found those fields. It addresses major theoretical movements such as narrative theory, formalism, historicism, and economic theory, as well as Victorian models of subjects such as anthropology, cognitive science, and religion. With its lists of key works, rich cross-referencing, extensive bibliographies, and explications of scholarly trajectories, the book is a crucial resource for graduate students and advanced undergraduates, while offering invaluable support to more seasoned scholars.

Cometh Up As A Flower

Violent Women and Sensation Fiction: Crime, Medicine and Victorian Popular Culture. Basingstoke: palgrave, 2007. maunder, andrew, ... Varieties of Women's Sensation Fiction, 1855-1890. london: pickering & Chatto, 2004. mitchell, sally.

Cometh Up As A Flower

An important sensation novel, Cometh Up as a Flower made Rhoda Broughton’s reputation and fortune while also attracting harsh criticism. Nell LeStrange, the heroine, is tricked by her calculating sister into leaving her poor lover and marrying a wealthy man she does not love. What angered critics of the time was the heroine’s frank discussion of her sexual attraction to her lover, and her dispassionate evaluation of loveless marriage as a form of self-sale. Broughton’s lively, colloquial narrative voice, witty observations of contemporary manners, and sympathetic portrayal of the lives and feelings of young women, though no longer shocking, are as engaging now as they were to her readers of 1867. This Broadview Edition includes an extensive selection of appendices on the novel’s reception (including a parody of Broughton), Victorian discourses on health and medicine, and contemporary attitudes towards women, marriage, and sexuality.

Creating character

Theories of nature and nurture in Victorian sensation fiction Helena Ifill ... 73–88; Andrew Mangham, Violent Women and Sensation Fiction: Crime, Medicine and Victorian Popular Culture (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007), pp.

Creating character

This book explores the ways in which the two leading sensation authors of the 1860s, Mary Elizabeth Braddon and Wilkie Collins, engaged with nineteenth-century ideas about personality formation and the extent to which it can be influenced either by the subject or by others. Innovative readings of seven sensation novels explore how they employ and challenge Victorian theories of heredity, degeneration, inherent constitution, education, upbringing and social circumstance. Far from presenting a reductive depiction of ‘nature’ versus ‘nurture’, Braddon and Collins show the creation of character to be a complex interplay of internal and external factors. Drawing on material ranging from medical textbooks, to sociological treatises, to popular periodicals, Creating character shows how sensation authors situated themselves at the intersections of established and developing, conservative and radical, learned and sensationalist thought about how identity could be made and modified.