Viral Parenting

To Ellie Altshuler, Steve Troha, Sana Sherali, Leah Miller, and my extended
Hachette team... Don't think just because you work in the shadows on this book
that I don't know how much you do for me and making my Viral Parenting book
come ...

Viral Parenting

Mindy McKnight, YouTube's favorite mom, shares the tools parents need to keep kids safe in their online lives--and shows how to create stronger family relationships as they do. A cross between Jen Hatmaker and Rosalind Wiseman, VIRAL PARENTING is a guide to raising responsible, safe, and communicative kids in the digital world. Mindy shares practical tools for having honest conversations with kids of all ages about privacy, bullying, respectfulness, and family time, while emphasizing the importance of trust and open communication. These strategies are timeless--whether applied to texting, snapping, Facebooking, kiking, or whatever social media platforms await us in the future, this book is ultimately about teaching children about personal responsibility and safety. Mindy shares practical tools for creating family rules for kids of all ages about privacy, bullying, respectfulness, and family time, while emphasizing the importance of trust and open communication. Using family contracts, guided conversations, device checks, and respectful but firm oversight, the McKnights have raised a close knit family and navigated the complexity of being world-wide internet celebrities with grace. McKnight will show any parent of any child or teen how that's done--setting non-negotiable guidelines and offering a savvy perspective toward privacy that audience have been begging for.

The Art of Screen Time

VIRAL PARENTING I talked to Jonah Berger, a professor at Wharton Business
School and the author of Contagious: Why Things Catch On, about why there's so
much parent-related viral content—call it mombait. First of all, he tells me, any ...

The Art of Screen Time

Finally, an evidence-based, don't-panic guide to what to do about kids and screens. Today's babies often make their debut on social media with the very first sonogram. They begin interacting with screens at around four months old. But is this good news or bad news? A wonderful opportunity to connect around the world? Or the first step in creating a generation of addled screen zombies? Many have been quick to declare this the dawn of a neurological and emotional crisis, but solid science on the subject is surprisingly hard to come by. In The Art of Screen Time, Anya Kamenetz--an expert on education and technology, as well as a mother of two young children--takes a refreshingly practical look at the subject. Surveying hundreds of fellow parents on their practices and ideas, and cutting through a thicket of inconclusive studies and overblown claims, she hones a simple message, a riff on Michael Pollan's well-known "food rules": Enjoy Screens. Not too much. Mostly with others. This brief but powerful dictum forms the backbone of a philosophy that will help parents moderate technology in their children's lives, curb their own anxiety, and create room for a happy, healthy family life with and without screens.

The Parent App

Perhaps the most striking and illustrative recent example of how this ethic of
respectful connectedness may be the mainstream approach to digital and mobile
media, I think, is the story of the viral video “Facebook Parenting.” The video was
 ...

The Parent App

Offers parents strategies for coping with the increasing presence of digital and mobile media and for managing new technology for their children, and examines how approaches differ among families according to income.

The Biology of Reproduction

For instance, in retroviruses (such as HIV), the genetic material consists of an
RNA sequence. When infecting a cell, the genome of a viral 'parent unit' is retro-
transcribed into the cell's DNA, while at the same time it induces the cell to
produce ...

The Biology of Reproduction

A look into the phenomena of sex and reproduction in all organisms, taking an innovative, unified and comprehensive approach.

X Plan Parenting

Now in X-Plan Parenting, Fulks expands on the how and the why behind his plan, emphasizing the importance of developing trusting relationships with our kids.

X Plan Parenting

The creator of the viral parenting concept the “X-Plan” illuminates the importance of awakening your child’s unique strength—while also taking an introspective look at your own life story to become a better parent. Last year, father and former teacher Bert Fulks’s simple parenting idea went viral: if your teenagers find themselves in a situation where they feel uncomfortable or trapped, they can text a family member an “X.” That family member will then call, giving the teen a way out, while still maintaining their freedom—and no questions will be asked. Now in X-Plan Parenting, Fulks expands on the how and the why behind his plan, emphasizing the importance of developing trusting relationships with our kids. Drawing on biblical principles, Fulks’s approach illuminates how even though we want the very best for our children, we sometimes parent from a place of brokenness and a desire for control rather than support and encouragement. We focus on our mistakes and painful growing-up moments and the things we wish we’d had when we were kids instead of what’s best for our own children right now. This dynamic can pit kids against their parents and create rifts in the relationship. Fulks advocates for an alliance between children and parents instead of an “us vs. them” mentality. Rather than spending so much time coaxing or battling our kids, Fulks inspires us to work with our kids instead of against them. And rather than trying to right our own past wrongs vicariously through our children, he urges us to recognize where we need healing so we can provide authentic strength to support our kids’ unique journeys. There is a tender art to disciplining our kids, and X-Plan Parenting serves up laughter and tears, hard questions, and plenty of grace to moms and dads who want their kids to love God and lead passionate, joyful lives in an unpredictable world.

The Biology of Animal Viruses

This is a special case of recombination or reassortment in which one or both of
the parental viruses has been ... When the inactivated parental viruses are of the
same strain the process is called multiplicity reactivation; when one parent is ...

The Biology of Animal Viruses

The Biology of Animal Viruses, Second Edition deals with animal viruses focusing on molecular biology and tumor virology. The book reviews the nature, chemical composition, structure, and classification of animal viruses. The text also describes the methods of isolating animal viruses, how these are grown in the laboratory, assayed, purified, and used in biochemical experiments. The book also describes the structure and chemistry of many known viruses such as the papovaviridae, herpes virus, poxvirus, coronavirus, or the Bunyamwera supergroup. The book then explains the structure and function of the animal cell including the cytoplasmic organelles, the nucleus, inhibitors of cell function, and viral multiplication. Other papers discuss in detail the multiplication of the DNA and RNA viruses, whose mechanisms of multiplication differ from those of other viruses. Other papers discuss the known prevention and treatment methods of viral diseases, as well as the epidemiology and evolution of viral diseases resulting from human's disturbance of the biosphere and from medical and experimental innovations. The text can prove useful for immunologists, veterinarians, virologists, molecular researchers, students, and academicians in the field of cellular microbiology and virology.

Structural Approaches to Sequence Evolution

Thus, each new viral genome differs from its parent at one or two nucleotide
positions. The relative proportion of a specific mutant in the viral population
depends on the rate at which the mutant is generated and on its fitness, which is
defined ...

Structural Approaches to Sequence Evolution

Recent advances in understanding the thermodynamics of macromolecules, the topological properties of gene networks, the organization and mutation capabilities of genomes, and the structure of populations make it possible to incorporate these key elements into a broader and deeply interdisciplinary view of molecular evolution. This book gives an account of such a new approach, through clear tutorial contributions by leading scientists.

Influenza

Studies that quantitate viral replication in target organs as well as pathological
response are necessary to define gradations ... R1 (bearing all other genes from
PR8) reduced virulence to a level intermediate between the two parental viruses.

Influenza

My lifetime encompasses the postwar subsidence in the early 1920s of the greatest influenza pandemic in history, direct encounters with FM1 virus at Fort Mon mouth in 1947, the care of influenza patients in the 1950s, the pursuit of the in fluenza virus through the modern pandemics of 1957 and 1968, and a present in which the genes of the virus have dissembled in the DNA of vaccinia virus and Escherichia coli through the wand of "high tech. " If my corpus could be fossilized for archival and archaeological purposes, it would be found to contain immune cells branded with the imprint of the "swine" influenza virus of post-1918 and brain cells no less imprinted with memories of the abortive return of its descendant during America's bicentennial. But before that unlikely event, I wanted to try to make some sense out of this baffling dis ease and its viruses-expecting no definitive revelations but hoping for a sharper definition of problems. Hence this book. It is an audacious act in these days of specialization to essay a book such as this singlehandedly, but I have done so for selfish reasons. I wanted to reexam ine old questions about the nature of influenza and its epidemics in the light of the dazzling advances in molecular biology of the past few years. No virus has been better studied, but few diseases are less well understood.

Basic Pre Med Parent Lesson Plan

T F Dental caries are the most common viral infection in humans. 2. T F
Photomicrographs of the virions of tobacco mosaic virus and an animal virus
show that the architecture of virions is vastly different between the two. 3. T F
Viruses with the ...

Basic Pre Med Parent Lesson Plan

Basic Pre-Med Course Description This is the suggested course sequence that allows one core area of science to be studied per semester. You can change the sequence of the semesters per the needs or interests of your student; materials for each semester are independent of one another to allow flexibility. Semester 1: Microbiology As the world waits in fear, world health organizations race to develop a vaccine for the looming bird flu epidemic-a threat that has forced international, federal, and local governments to begin planning for a possible pandemic, and the widespread death and devastation which would follow. Will the world find an answer in time? Or will we see this threat ravage populations as others have before in 1918 with influenza in the late 18th century with yellow fever, or the horrific “black death” or bubonic plague in 1347 AD? “Are these [viruses] examples of evolution? --Did God make microbes by mistake? Are they accidents of evolution, out of the primordial soup?” These timely questions are examined throughout The Genesis of Germs. It seems that a new and more terrible disease is touted on the news almost daily. The spread of these scary diseases from bird flu to SARS to AIDS is a cause for concern and leads to questions such as: Where did all these germs come from, and how do they fit into a biblical world view? What kind of function did these microbes have before the Fall? Does antibiotic resistance in bacteria prove evolution? How can something so small have such a huge, deadly impact on the world around us? Professor Alan Gillen sheds light on these and many other questions in this revealing and detailed book. He shows how these constantly mutating diseases are proof for devolution rather than evolution and how all of these germs fit into a biblical world view. Dr. Gillen shows how germs are symptomatic of the literal Fall and Curse of creation as a result of man’s sin and the hope we have in the coming of Jesus Christ. Semester 2: Life Science Study clear biological answers for how science and Scripture fit together to honor the Creator. Have you ever wondered about such captivating topics as genetics, the roll of natural selection, embryonic development, or DNA and the magnificent origins of life? Within Building Blocks in Life Science you will discover exceptional insights and clarity to patterns of order in living things, including the promise of healing and new birth in Christ. Study numerous ways to refute the evolutionary worldview that life simply evolved by chance over millions of years. The evolutionary worldview can be found filtered through every topic at every age-level in our society. It has become the overwhelmingly accepted paradigm for the origins of life as taught in all secular institutions. This dynamic education resource helps young people not only learn science from a biblical perspective, but also helps them know how to defend their faith in the process.

Malignant Transformation by Viruses

The one exception, clonal line B17, was pseudodiploid, and presumably this
alteration was unrelated to virus activity since parent and other clonal lines were
euploid. A range of morphologically different fibroblast- and epithelial-like clones
 ...

Malignant Transformation by Viruses

The position of "Cancer Teaching Coordinator" at The University of Chicago has been a consistently rewarding one because of the enthusiasm and support of the faculty and the students. This volume is the result of the second of two recent intensive teach ing sessions which have been planned and implemented by the group which forms the Cancer Coordinator's Advisory Committee. The first of these teaching sessions was held in early March of 1964 and was entitled "LEUKEMIA, A Current and Forward Look. " It attracted overflow attendance from the students and staff of this medical institution augmented by members of the other medical centers in Chicago. It was a stimulating and instructive colloquium, and the only regret we heard expressed afterward was that we had not arranged for publication of the many excellent presentations. One of the events commemorating the seventy-fifth anniversary of the founding of The University of Chicago was this symposium on malignant transformations. This time the Committee advised us to plan on speedy publication, and, logically, it chose Dr. Werner Kirsten, a member of our faculty and an active and effective investigator in this general field of endeavor, to serve as editor of the volume. Again, two of the same ingredients for effective instruction were blended: an excellent group of scientists presenting their latest work and a fine, attentive audience of students and staff.