Virgil Recomposed

With the centonists distorting the semantic functions of Virgil's verse units to create narratives that differ from Virgil's own, a striking discrepancy arises between the patchwork poems and their source material.

Virgil Recomposed

The Virgilian centos anticipate the avant-garde and smash the image of a staid, sober, and centered classical world. This book examines the twelve mythological and secular Virgilian centos that survive from antiquity. The centos, in which authors take non-consecutive lines or segments of lines from the Eclogues, Georgics, and Aeneid and reconnect them to produce new poems, have received limited attention. No other book-length study exists of all the centos, which date from ca. 200 to ca. 530. The centos are literary games, and they have a playful shock value that feels very modern. Yet the texts also demand to be taken seriously for what they disclose about late antique literary culture, Virgil's reception, and several important topics in Latin literature and literary studies generally. As radically intertextual works, the centos are particularly valuable sites for pursuing inquiry into allusion. Scrutinizing the peculiarities of the texts' allusive engagements with Virgil requires clarification of the roles of the author and the reader in allusion, the criteria for determining what constitutes an allusion, and the different functions allusion can have. By investigating the centos from these different perspectives and asking what they reveal about a wide range of weighty subjects, this book comes into dialogue with major topics and studies in Latin literature.

Virgil Recomposed

This is the first book to present a comprehensive study of the mythological and secular Virgilian centos.

Virgil Recomposed

This is the first book to present a comprehensive study of the mythological and secular Virgilian centos.

The Gospel According to Homer and Virgil

32 See also McGill, Virgil Recomposed, XV–XVI, 157 n. 27. 33 As for their role among the Christians, see Sandnes, The Challenge of Homer; Freund; Vergil im frühen Christentum; Sabine MacCormack, The Shadows ofPoetry.

The Gospel  According to Homer and Virgil

This study investigates the phenomenon of Christian centos, i.e. attempts at rewriting the Gospel stories in both the style and vocabulary of either Homer (Greek) or Virgil (Latin). Out of the classical epics an entirely new text emerged.

Virgil

Julia Haig Gaisser, Catullus and his Renaissance Readers (1993); Craig Kallendorf, Virgil and the Myth of Venice: Books and ... Gärtnerand WolfLüderLiebermann, “Cento,” New Pauly3(2008), and ScottMcGill,Virgil Recomposed (2005) passim.

Virgil

Virgil offers undergraduates, graduate students and general readers a comprehensive and carefully balanced introduction to the works and literary reception of Virgil. Offers a fresh, comprehensive introduction to Virgil in translation Explores the historical context in which Virgil wrote and lived Discusses the manuscript tradition of Virgil Traces the poet’s literary influence on later authors and his impact on the arts Includes suggestions for further readings

Virgil

The Cambridge Companion to Virgil, 2nd edition. Cambridge. Mayer, R. 1983. 'Missing Persons in the Eclogues', BICS 30, 17–30. McAuslan, I., and Walcot, P. 1990. Greece & Rome Studies: Virgil. Oxford. McGill, S. 2005. Virgil Recomposed: ...

Virgil

The works of Virgil (70–19 BCE) define the 'golden age' of Latin poetry and have inspired a long tradition of interpretation and adaptation that starts in his own time and extends to important modern authors. His ascent from the lesser genre of pastoral (the Bucolics) through a more ambitious didactic mode (the Georgics) to the soaring heights of epic (the incomparable Aeneid) shaped the canonical writings of other authors, from his younger contemporary Ovid through the medieval writers Dante and Petrarch to the early modern poets Spenser and Milton and well beyond. Virgil, as Alison Keith shows, has never gone out of critical or popular fashion. This wide-ranging introduction appraises a figure of central importance in the history of Western music, art and literature. Offering close readings of the Bucolics, Georgics and Aeneid, Keith places Virgil and his poetry in historical context before tracing their impact at key moments in the culture of the West. Emphasis is placed on Virgil's reception of the classical literary and philosophical traditions, and on how his poetry has attracted modern interest from writers as diverse as T. S. Eliot and Ursula K. Le Guin.

The Protean Virgil

Virgil Recomposed: The Mythological and Secular Centos in Antiquity. American Philological Association, American Classical Studies, 48 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005). McKay, Alexander G. 'Book Illustrations of Vergil's Aeneid ...

The Protean Virgil

Taking Virgil's poetry as a case study, 'The Protean Virgil' argues that when we try to understand different readers' varying responses to the same text over time, we should take into account the physical form in which they read the text (e.g. manuscripts, books, or computerized files) as well as the text itself.

The Cambridge Companion to Virgil

Virgil, Georgics, 1.463-5 14°, in D. West and T. Woodman, eds., Quality and Pleasure in ... (1978) Ciris: A Poem Attributed to Virgil. Cambridge. ... McGill, S. (2005) Virgil Recomposed: The Mythological and Secular Centos in Antiquity.

The Cambridge Companion to Virgil

Presents stimulating chapters on Virgil and his reception, offering an authoritative overview of the current state of Virgilian studies.

Virgil Aeneid 5

Lyne 1989 = Lyne, R. Words and the Poet: Characteristic Techniques of Style in Vergil's Aeneid. ... McGill 2005 = McGill, S. Virgil Recomposed: The Mythological and Secular Centos in Antiquity. Oxford, 2005.

Virgil  Aeneid 5

Fratantuono and Smith provide the first detailed consideration of Book 5 of Virgil’s Aeneid, with introduction, critical text, translation and commentary.

Virgil Aeneid 8

McGill 2005 = McGill, S. Virgil Recomposed: The Mythological and Secular Centos. Oxford, 2005. McKay 1970= McKay, A.Vergil'sItaly.Greenwich,Connecticut:NewYork GraphicSoci- ety, 1970. McNelis 2007 = McNelis, C. Statius' Thebaid and the ...

Virgil  Aeneid 8

Virgil, Aeneid 8 provides the first full-scale commentary on one of the most important and popular books of the great epic of imperial Rome. The commentary is accompanied by a new critical text and a prose translation.

The Ancient Lives of Virgil

2011 Virgil Recomposed: The mythological and secular Virgilian Centos in Antiquity, Oxford 2005. Montgomery, H. 1996 'Pontius' Vita S.Cypriani and the making of a saint', Symbolae Osloenses 71, 195–215. Roberts, M. 1985 BiblicalEpic and ...

The Ancient Lives of Virgil

The Ancient Lives of the poet Virgil, written in prose (and sometimes in verse), have long enjoyed great, though controversial, influence. Modern critics have often been scornful of these Lives, for trying to construct biography of the poet from allegorical reading of his verse. Yet some elements of the Lives are trusted, and quietly adopted as canonical, most notably the dating of Virgil's death. Some vignettes in the Lives have been cherished for their image of an emotive poet, as when Virgil, by evoking in verse the premature death of Augustus' nephew Marcellus, caused the young man's bereaved mother to faint. Less romantic detail from the Lives, as of Virgil's privileged material circumstances at the heart of the Augustan regime, has been less regarded. The present volume, from a distinguished international team, aims to revalue the Ancient Lives of Virgil from a variety of angles and in a variety of scholarly genres. The allegory within the Lives is here studied for its own sake, and shown to be part of a developed Graeco-Roman school of interpretation. The literary character of the verse Life attributed to Phocas is respectfully analysed. Certain political references within the best-known prose Life, the `Suetonian-Donatan', are shown to be apparently independent of allegory, and to be worth prospecting for new information on the poet's personal history. And ideas of Virgil received and developed with brio in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance are here traced back to the Ancient Lives of the poet composed in Antiquity.

Generic Enrichment in Vergil and Horace

(1987), Further Voices in Vergil's Aeneid (Oxford). —— (1989), Words and the Poet (Oxford). —— (1995), Horace: Behind the Public Poetry (New Haven, Conn.). McGill, S. (2005), Virgil Recomposed: The Mythological and Secular Centos in ...

Generic Enrichment in Vergil and Horace

S. J. Harrison sets out to sketch one answer to a key question in Latin literary history: why did the period c.39-19 BC in Rome produce such a rich range of complex poetical texts, above all in the work of the famous poets Vergil and Horace? Harrison argues that one central aspect of this literary flourishing was the way in which different poetic genres or kinds (pastoral, epic, tragedy, etc.) interacted with each other and that that interaction itself was a prominent literary subject. He explores this issue closely through detailed analysis of passages of the two poets' works between these dates. Harrison opens with an outline of generic theory ancient and modern as a basis for his argument, suggesting how different poetic genres and their partial presence in each other can be detected in the Latin poetry of the first century BC.

The Virgilian Tradition

See S. McGill , Virgil Recomposed : The Mythological and Secular Centos in Antiquity [ Oxford , 2005 ) , for a full discussion of the nonreligious centos . ) 1. PETRONIUS See above , I.C.13.e. 2. HOSIDIUS GETA AND AFRICAN CENTOS ...

The Virgilian Tradition

This indispensable anthology gathers texts and translations that cover major aspects of the Virgilian tradition from the Roman poet’s own lifetime to the year 1500. Unprecedented in scope, the book presents a vast compendium of materials that illuminate how poets, teachers, students, and common folk responded to Virgil and his poetry. The volume offers a brief commentary on each text, many of which are translated into English for the first time. The book begins with a chronological survey of Virgil’s influence upon writers from Augustan Rome to Renaissance Italy. There follow detailed reviews of biographies of Virgil, of how his writings were received and used, and of how the poet was envisaged and explained through the centuries. The final section focuses on the tradition of legends associated with Virgil.

The First Pagan Historian

At the same time , Virgil transcended his role as a curricular staple . ... On the Virgilian cento , see Scott McGill , Virgil Recomposed : The Mythological and Secular Centos in Antiquity ( Oxford , 2005 ) . 30. See August . Conf .

The First Pagan Historian

"The First Pagan Historian traces the reception history of a text that is now largely neglected but once occupied a central role in the ancient canon-the De excidio Troiae historia or History of the Destruction of Troy of one Dares Phrygius, who claimed to have been an eyewitness observer of the Trojan War. From late antiquity (when most scholars today now agree that the extant Latin version of the text was written) to the eighteenth-century Enlightenment, this study charts the many surprising twists and turns in the afterlife of an author long considered the first of the pagans to write history. It examines the subversive challenge that Dares posed to other ancient canonical traditions (especially the poetry of Homer and Virgil), and the manner in which Dares' bold rewriting of the Troy story enabled centuries of postclassical readers to forge their own-sometimes radical-visions of the distant past. In doing so The First Pagan Historian moves back and forth between the ancient world itself and various moments in the Middle Ages and the early modern period, using the fortunes of a forged text to interrogate approaches to history, fiction, myth, philology, criticism, authorship and numerous other topics of profound importance to the interplay between antiquity and modernity"--

Text Kontext Kontextualisierung

Horsfall, N. (2000): Vergil. Aeneid 7. A Commentary, Leiden/Boston/Köln. La Fico Guzzo, M. L., Carmignani, M. (2012): Proba, ... McGill, S. (2005): Virgil recomposed. The Mythological and Secular Centos in Antiquity, Oxford.

Text  Kontext  Kontextualisierung

„Kontextualisierung“ gilt als ein unverzichtbares Instrument bei der Analyse antiker Texte. Ist etwas als „Kontext“ benannt, spricht man ihm ein Erklärungspotential zu, welches bewirkt, dass das Kontextualisierte erst angemessen verstanden werden kann. Die Entscheidung, etwas als Kontext anzusehen, berührt daher stets auch die Frage nach der Angemessenheit der Interpretation. Das Anliegen des Bandes ist es, beide Begriffe zu problematisieren und die methodische Reflexion darüber anzustoßen. Einleitend werden drei in Kulturwissenschaften, Linguistik und Literaturtheorie entwickelte Kontextkonzepte vorgestellt. Eine Reihe altertumswissenschaftlicher Beiträge reflektiert exemplarisch, was „Kontext“ im jeweiligen Zusammenhang bedeutet, wie Kontextbeziehungen hergestellt werden und welches analytische Potential sich daraus ergibt. In drei Sektionen beschäftigen sie sich damit, wie „Kontext“ in Interpretationen in Anspruch genommen wird, mit dem Problem fehlender oder multipler Kontexte sowie mit den Anschlussstellen für Kontextualisierungen in Texten. "Contextualisation" is generally held to be an indispensable instrument for analysing ancient works. Identifying something as a "context" involves providing an explanation for it that allows the contextualised text or fact to be appropriately understood. Thus, the decision to view something as a context is closely connected with the problem of correct interpretation. It is the aim of this volume to critically examine these two concepts and to initiate reflection on the methodology used. The volume starts by introducing three contextual concepts developed in the fields of cultural studies, linguistics and modern literary studies. A number of papers using Greek and Latin works as examples reflect on the meaning of "context", the ways of establishing relationships between texts and contexts, and the resulting potential for analysis and interpretation. The papers are divided into three sections that focus on how the term and concept of "context" is used in interpretations, on the problem of missing or multiple contexts, and on possible interfaces that the ancient works themselves provide between text and context(s).

A Companion to Vergil s Aeneid and its Tradition

Virgil Recomposed: The Mythological and Secular Centos in Antiquity. American Philological Association American Classical Studies Series, 49. New York and Oxford. McGregor, J.H. (1991). The Shades of Aeneas: The Imitation of Vergil and ...

A Companion to Vergil s Aeneid and its Tradition

A Companion to Vergil’s Aeneid and its Tradition presents a collection of original interpretive essays that represent an innovative addition to the body of Vergil scholarship. Provides fresh approaches to traditional Vergil scholarship and new insights into unfamiliar aspects of Vergil's textual history Features contributions by an international team of the most distinguished scholars Represents a distinctively original approach to Vergil scholarship

The Last Trojan Hero

A Cultural History of Virgil's Aeneid Philip Hardie ... Paris Leach, E.W. (1982) 'Illustration as interpretation in Brant's and Dryden's editions of Vergil', ... Newark, DE, and London McGill, Scott (2005) Virgil Recomposed.

The Last Trojan Hero

The resonant opening lines of Virgil's Aeneid rank among the most famous and consistently recited verses to have been passed down to later ages by antiquity. And after The Odyssey and the Iliad, Virgil's masterpiece is arguably the greatest classical text in the whole of Western literature. This sinuous and richly characterised epic vitally influenced th poetry of Dante, Petrarch and Milton. The doomed love of Dido and Aeneas inspired Purcell, while for T.S. Eliot Virgil's poem was 'the classic of all Europe'. The poet's stirring tale of a refugee Trojan prince, 'torn from Libyan waves' to found a new homeland in Italy, has provided much fertile material for writings on colonialism and for discourses of ethic and national identity. The Aeneid has even been viewed as a template and source of justification for British and European imperialisms and for American nation-building. In his major and much anticipated new book Philip Hardie explores the many remarkable afterlives- ancient, medieval and modern- of the Aeneid in literature, music, politics, the visual arts and film. The Last Trojan Hero, by one of Virgil's leading interpreters, put continually fresh and surprising perspectives on one of the outstanding works of civilization. Placing the Aeneid on a broad artistic and historical canvas, it shows with elegance, originality and creative insight how and in what ways this remarkably durable text continues so powerfully to capture the cultural imagination and why it still speaks to us over a gulf of centuries.

Claudian and the Roman Epic Tradition

London, 143—205 (1981) Art and Ceremony in LateAntiquity. Berkeley (1998) The Shadows ofPoetry. Vergil in the Mind ofAugustine. Berkeley McGill, S. (2005) Virgil Recomposed. The Mythological and Secular Centos in Antiquity. Oxford.

Claudian and the Roman Epic Tradition

The historical importance of Claudian as writer of panegyric and propaganda for the court of Honorius is well established but his poetry has been comparatively neglected: only recently has his work been the subject of modern literary criticism. Taking as its starting point Claudian's claim to be the heir to Virgil, this book examines his poetry as part of the Roman epic tradition. Discussing first what we understand by epic and its relevance for late antiquity, Catherine Ware argues that, like Virgil and later Roman epic poets, Claudian analyses his contemporary world in terms of classical epic. Engaging intertextually with his literary predecessors, Claudian updates concepts such as furor and concordia, redefining Romanitas to exclude the increasingly hostile east, depicting enemies of the west as new Giants and showing how the government of Honorius and his chief minister, Stilicho, have brought about a true golden age for the west.

Structures of Epic Poetry

The function of Vergil's funeral games, CW 66: 85–96. Grassmann-Fischer, B. (1966). ... Virgil recomposed. ... Ut imago poesis: a pastiche of Virgil and Ovid in the cento Narcissus, Graeco-Latina Brunensia 14:177–89. Okáčová, M. (2016).

Structures of Epic Poetry

This compendium (4 vols.) studies the continuity, flexibility, and variation of structural elements in epic narratives. It provides an overview of the structural patterns of epic poetry by means of a standardized, stringent terminology. Both diachronic developments and changes within individual epics are scrutinized in order to provide a comprehensive structural approach and a key to intra- and intertextual characteristics of ancient epic poetry.

Robert Burton s Rhetoric

For readings based on the rearrangement of classic texts, see McGill, Virgil Recomposed, and Okáčová, “Centones.” For readings based on compilations of quotations, see Tucker, “Justus Lipsius and the Cento Form.” 74.

Robert Burton   s Rhetoric

Published in five editions between 1621 and 1651, The Anatomy of Melancholy marks a unique moment in the development of disciplines, when fields of knowledge were distinct but not yet restrictive. In Robert Burton’s Rhetoric, Susan Wells analyzes the Anatomy, demonstrating how its early modern practices of knowledge and persuasion can offer a model for transdisciplinary scholarship today. In the first decades of the seventeenth century, Robert Burton attempted to gather all the existing knowledge about melancholy, drawing from professional discourses including theology, medicine, and philology as well as the emerging sciences. Examining this text through a rhetorical lens, Wells provides an account of these disciplinary exchanges in all their subtle variety and abundant wit, showing that questions of how knowledge is organized and how it is made persuasive are central to rhetorical theory. Ultimately, Wells argues that in addition to a book about melancholy, Burton’s Anatomy is a meditation on knowledge. A fresh interpretation of The Anatomy of Melancholy, this volume will be welcomed by scholars of early modern English and the rhetorics of health and medicine, as well as those interested in transdisciplinary work and rhetorical theory.

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

... Virgil Recomposed S. MacGill , Virgil Recomposed : Liber Annuus Liber Annuus : Studii Biblici Franciscani ( 1951- ) The Mythological and Secular Centos in Antiquity ( 2005 ) Liebeschuetz , Barbarians J. H. W. G. Liebeschuetz ...

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity is the first comprehensive reference book covering every aspect of history, culture, religion, and life in Europe, the Mediterranean, and the Near East (including the Persian Empire and Central Asia) between the mid-3rd and the mid-8th centuries AD, the era now generally known as Late Antiquity. This period saw the re-establishment of the Roman Empire, its conversion to Christianity and its replacement in the West by Germanic kingdoms, the continuing Roman Empire in the Eastern Mediterranean, the Persian Sassanian Empire, and the rise of Islam. Consisting of over 1.5 million words in more than 5,000 A-Z entries, and written by more than 400 contributors, it is the long-awaited middle volume of a series, bridging a significant period of history between those covered by the acclaimed Oxford Classical Dictionary and The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages. The scope of the Dictionary is broad and multi-disciplinary; across the wide geographical span covered (from Western Europe and the Mediterranean as far as the Near East and Central Asia), it provides succinct and pertinent information on political history, law, and administration; military history; religion and philosophy; education; social and economic history; material culture; art and architecture; science; literature; and many other areas. Drawing on the latest scholarship, and with a formidable international team of advisers and contributors, The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity aims to establish itself as the essential reference companion to a period that is attracting increasing attention from scholars and students worldwide.