Visions of Order in William Gilmore Simms

WILLIAM GILMORE SIMMS Southern Conservatism and the Other American Romance MASAHIRO NAKAMURA ONE OF NINETEENTH ... For Nakamura , Simms's vision of social order runs contrary to the staunch individualism expressed in traditional ...

Visions of Order in William Gilmore Simms

One of nineteenth-century America's foremost men of letters, William Gilmore Simms (1806-1870) of Charleston, South Carolina, distinguished himself as a historian, poet, and novelist; yet his stalwart allegiance to the ideals of the Confederacy have kept him largely marginalized from the modern literary canon. In this engaging study, Masahiro Nakamura seeks to reinsert Simms in current American literary and cultural studies through a careful consideration of Simms's southern conservatism as a valuable literary counterpoint to the bourgeois individualist ideology of his northern contemporaries. For Nakamura, Simms's vision of social order runs contrary to the staunch individualism expressed in traditional American romances by authors such as James Fenimore Cooper and Nathaniel Hawthorne. In his thoughtful approaches to Simms's historical depictions of the making of American history and society, Nakamura finds consistent assertions of social order against the perils of literal and metaphoric wilderness, a conservative vision that he traces to the influence of Simms's southern genius loci. To understand how this southern conservatism also manifests itself in Simms's fiction, Nakamura contrasts Simms's historical romances with those of Hawthorne, as representative of the New England romance tradition, to differentiate the ways in which the two writers interpret the dynamic between the individual and society. Nakamura finds that Simms's protagonists struggle to establish their places within their culture while Hawthorne's characters are often at odds with their culture. The resulting comparison enriches our understanding of both writers.

Reading William Gilmore Simms

Though it is the central focus of neither, Vasconselos is treated in some depth in two recent books: Mashahiro Nakamura's Visions of Order in William Gilmore Simms (2009) and Sean Busick's A Sober Desire for History (2005).

Reading William Gilmore Simms

William Gilmore Simms was the best known and certainly the most accomplished writer of the mid-nineteenth-century South. His literary ascent began early, with his first book being published when he was nineteen years old and his reputation as a literary genius secured before he turned thirty. Over a career that spanned nearly forty-five years, he established himself as the American South's premier man of letters—an accomplished poet, novelist, short fiction writer, essayist, historian, dramatist, cultural journalist, biographer, and editor. In Reading William Gilmore Simms, Todd Hagstette has created an anthology of critical introductions to Simms's major publications, including those recently brought back into print by the University of South Carolina Press, offering the first ever primer compendium of the author's vast output. Simms was a Renaissance man of American letters, lauded in his time by both popular audiences and literary icons alike. Yet the author's extensive output, which includes nearly eighty published volumes, can be a barrier to his study. To create a gateway to reading and studying Simms, Hagstette has assembled thirty-eight essays by twenty-four scholars to review fifty-five Simms works. Addressing all the author's major works, the essays provide introductory information and scholarly analysis of the most crucial features of Simms's literary achievement. Arranged alphabetically by title for easy access, the book also features a topical index for more targeted inquiry into Simms's canon. Detailing the great variety and astonishing consistency of Simms's thought throughout his long career as well as examining his posthumous reconsideration, Reading William Gilmore Simms bridges the author's genius and readers' growing curiosity. The only work of its kind, this book provides an essential passport to the far-flung worlds of Simms's fecund imagination.

Vasconselos

Visions of Order in William Gilmore Simms: Southern Conservatism and the Other American Romance. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2009. Parrington, Vernon L. The Romantic Tradition in America: 1800–1860. Vol.

Vasconselos

The writings of William Gilmore Simms (1806–1870) provide a sweeping fictional portrait of the colonial and antebellum South in all of its regional diversity. Simms's account of the region is more comprehensive than that of any other author of his time; he treats the major intellectual and social issues of the South and depicts the bonds and tensions among all of its inhabitants. By the mid-1840s Simms's novels were so well known that Edgar Allan Poe could call him "the best novelist which this country has, on the whole, produced." Perhaps the darkest of Simms's novel-length works, Vasconselos (1853) presents a fictionalized account of one of the first European efforts to settle the land that would become the United States, the Hernando de Soto expedition of 1539. Set largely in Havana, Cuba, as the explorers prepare to embark, the work explores such themes as the marginalization of racial and national minorities, the historical abuse of women, and the tendency of absolute power to corrupt absolutely. In addition, Simms anticipates in this colonial romance the works of renowned scholars who would follow him, including the historian Frederick Jackson Turner and the entire formal scholarly field of psychology, which would take shape only long after the author's death.

Hemispheric Regionalism

William Gilmore Simms, The Letters of William Gilmore Simms (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1952), 3:256n. 24. See Masahiro Nakamura, Visions of Order in William Gilmore Simms: Southern Conservatism and the Other American ...

Hemispheric Regionalism

In this broad ranging study, Gretchen Woertendyke reconfigures US literary history as a product of hemispheric relations. Hemispheric Regionalism: Romance and the Geography of Genre, brings together a rich archive of popular culture, fugitive slave narratives, advertisements, political treatises, and literature to construct a new literary history from a hemispheric and regional perspective. At the center of this history is romance, a popular and versatile literary genre uniquely capable of translating the threat posed by the Haitian Revolution--or the expansionist possibilities of Cuban annexation--for a rapidly increasing readership. Through romance, she traces imaginary and real circuits of exchange and remaps romance's position in nineteenth century life and letters as irreducible to, nor fully mediated by, a concept of nation. The energies associated with Cuba and Haiti, manifest destiny and apocalypse, bring historical depth to an otherwise short national history. As a result, romance becomes remarkably influential in inculcating a sense of new world citizenry. The study shifts our critical focus from novel and nation, to romance and region, inevitable, she argues, when we attend to the tangled, messy relations across geographic and historical boundaries. Woertendyke reads the archives of Gabriel Prosser, Nat Turner, and Denmark Vesey along with less frequently treated writers such as John Howison, William Gilmore Simms, and J.H. Ingraham. The study provides a new context for understanding works by Washington Irving, Edgar Allan Poe, Herman Melville, and James Fenimore Cooper and brings together the theories of Charles Brockden Brown, the editorial work of Maturin M. Ballou, and the historical romances of Walter Scott. In Hemispheric Regionalism, Woertendyke demonstrates that US literature has always been the product of hemispheric and regional relations and that all forms of romance are central to this history.

Acts of Modernity

35 Masahiro Nakamura, Visions of Order in William Gilmore Simms: Southern Conservatism and the Other American Romance (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2009), 5. 36 William Gilmore Simms, The Partisan: A Tale of the ...

Acts of Modernity

In Acts of Modernity, David Buchanan reads nineteenth-century historical novels from Scotland, America, France, and Canada as instances of modern discourse reflective of community concerns and methods that were transatlantic in scope. Following on revolutionary events at home and abroad, the unique combination of history and romance initiated by Walter Scott’s Waverley (1814) furthered interest in the transition to and depiction of the nation-state. Established and lesser-known novelists reinterpreted the genre to describe the impact of modernization and to propose coping mechanisms, according to interests and circumstances. Besides analysis of the chronotopic representation of modernity within and between national contexts, Buchanan considers how remediation enabled diverse communities to encounter popular historical novels in upmarket and downmarket forms over the course of the century. He pays attention to the way communication practices are embedded within and constitutive of the social lives of readers, and more specifically, to how cultural producers adapted the historical novel to dynamic communication situations. In these ways, Acts of Modernity investigates how the historical novel was repeatedly reinvented to effectively communicate the consequences of modernity as problem-solutions of relevance to people on both sides of the Atlantic.

A Southern Writer and the Civil War

Masahiro Nakamura, Visions of Order in William Gilmore Simms: Southern Conservatism and the Other American Romance, (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2009). Rollin G. Ostwerweis, Romanticism and Nationalism in the Old South ...

A Southern Writer and the Civil War

This book lies at the intersection of Civil War history and the history of American literature. Rogers challenges prevailing assumptions about the nature of Southern identity during the American Civil War and describes an important period in the life of William Gilmore Simms, one of nineteenth-century America's most widely read authors.

Hans Christian Andersen in American Literary Criticism of the Nineteenth Century

William Gilmore Simms, review of Life in Italy: The Improvisatore, Southern and Western Magazine and Review, ... 6th ed., s.v. “Simms, William Gilmore,” and Masahiro Nakamura, Visions of Order in William Gilmore Simms: Southern ...

Hans Christian Andersen in American Literary Criticism of the Nineteenth Century

In Hans Christian Andersen in American Literary Criticism of the Nineteenth Century, Herbert Rowland argues that the literary criticism accompanying the publication of Hans Christian Andersen’s works in the United States compares favorably in scope, perceptiveness, and chronological coverage with the few other national receptions of Andersen outside of Denmark. Rowland contends that American commentators made it abundantly evident that, in addition to his fairy tales, Andersen wrote several novels, travelogues, and an autobiography which were all of more than common interest. In the process, Rowland shows that American commentators “naturalized” Andersen in the United States by confronting the sensationalism in the journalism and literature of the time with the perceived wholesomeness of Andersen’s writing, deploying his long fiction on both sides of the debate over the nature and relative value of the romance and the novel, and drawing on three of his works to support their positions on slavery, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.

Red States

See Busick's A Sober Desire for History: William Gilmore Simms as Historian (2001) and Nakamura's Visions of Order in William Gilmore Simms: Southern Conservatism and the Other American Romance (2009) for an overview and analysis of ...

Red States

Red States uses a regional focus in order to examine the tenets of white southern nativism and Indigenous resistance to colonialism in the U.S. South. Gina Caison argues that popular misconceptions of Native American identity in the U.S. South can be understood by tracing how non-Native audiences in the region came to imagine indigeneity through the presentation of specious histories presented in regional literary texts, and she examines how Indigenous people work against these narratives to maintain sovereign land claims in their home spaces through their own literary and cultural productions. As Caison demonstrates, these conversations in the U.S. South have consequences for how present-day conservative political discourses resonate across the United States. Assembling a newly constituted archive that includes regional theatrical and musical performances, pre-Civil War literatures, and contemporary novels, Caison illuminates the U.S. South's continued investment in settler colonialism and the continued Indigenous resistance to this paradigm. Ultimately, she concludes that the region is indeed made up of red states, but perhaps not in the way readers initially imagine.

Dangerous Ground

On Simms , see John Caldwell Guilds and Caroline Collins , eds . , William Gilmore Simms and the American Frontier ( Athens : University of Georgia Press , 1997 ) ; Masahiro Nakamura , Visions of Order in William Gilmore Simms ...

Dangerous Ground

The squatter--defined by Noah Webster as one that settles on new land without a title--had long been a fixture of America's frontier past. In the antebellum period, white squatters propelled the Jacksonian Democratic Party to dominance and the United States to the shores of the Pacific. In a bold reframing of the era's political history, John Suval explores how Squatter Democracy transformed the partisan landscape and the map of North America, hastening clashes that ultimately sundered the nation. With one eye on Washington and the other on flashpoints across the West, Dangerous Ground tracks squatters from the Mississippi Valley and cotton lands of Texas, to Oregon, Gold Rush-era California, and, finally, Bleeding Kansas. The sweeping narrative reveals how claiming western domains became stubbornly intertwined with partisan politics and fights over the extension of slavery. While previous generations of statesmen had maligned and sought to contain illegal settlers, Democrats celebrated squatters as pioneering yeomen and encouraged their land grabs through preemption laws, Indian removal, and hawkish diplomacy. As America expanded, the party's power grew. The US-Mexican War led many to ask whether these squatters were genuine yeomen or forerunners of slavery expansion. Some northern Democrats bolted to form the Free Soil Party, while southerners denounced any hindrance to slavery's spread. Faced with a fracturing party, Democratic leaders allowed territorial inhabitants to determine whether new lands would be slave or free, leading to a destabilizing transfer of authority from Congress to frontier settlers. Squatters thus morphed from agents of Manifest Destiny into foot soldiers in battles that ruptured the party and the country. Deeply researched and vividly written, Dangerous Ground illuminates the overlooked role of squatters in the United States' growth into a continent-spanning juggernaut and in the onset of the Civil War, casting crucial light on the promises and vulnerabilities of American democracy.

Against War and Empire

William Gilmore Simms, Atalantis: A Story of the Sea (New York: J. & J. Harper, 1832), 18, 13, 34, and 77. On Simms, see, for instance, Masahiro Nakamura, Visions of Order in William Gilmore Simms: ...

Against War and Empire

Whatmore presents an intellectual history of republicans who strove to ensure Geneva's survival as an independent state. Whatmore shows how the Genevan republicans grappled with the ideas of Rousseau, Coltaire, Bentham and others in seeking to make Europe safe for small states, by vanquishing the threats presented by war and by empire.

Faulkner and History

James W. C. Pennington quoted in William L. Andrews, To Tell a Free Story: The First Century of Afro-American ... 1835); Masahiro Nakamura, Visions of Order in William Gilmore Simms: Southern Conservatism and the Other American Romance ...

Faulkner and History

William Faulkner remains a historian's writer. A distinguished roster of historians have referenced Faulkner in their published work. They are drawn to him as a fellow historian, a shaper of narrative reflections on the meaning of the past; as a historiographer, a theorist, and dramatist of the fraught enterprise of doing history; and as a historical figure himself, especially following his mid-century emergence as a public intellectual after winning the Nobel Prize for Literature. This volume brings together historians and literary scholars to explore the many facets of Faulkner's relationship to history: the historical contexts of his novels and stories; his explorations of the historiographic imagination; his engagement with historical figures from both the regional and national past; his influence on professional historians; his pursuit of alternate modes of temporal awareness; and the histories of print culture that shaped the production, reception, and criticism of Faulkner's work. Contributors draw on the history of development in the Mississippi Valley, the construction of Confederate memory, the history and curriculum of Harvard University, twentieth-century debates over police brutality and temperance reform, the history of modern childhood, and the literary histories of anti-slavery writing and pulp fiction to illuminate Faulkner's work. Others in the collection explore the meaning of Faulkner's fiction for such professional historians as C. Vann Woodward and Albert Bushnell Hart. In these ways and more, Faulkner and History offers fresh insights into one of the most persistent and long-recognized elements of the Mississippian's artistic vision.

William Gilmore Simms s Selected Reviews on Literature and Civilization

Though Simms did not mention slaves directly, they would have fallen in the latter category, as dependents in a perpetual state of adolescence. The last point is important, because Simms's vision of social order was distinctly southern ...

William Gilmore Simms s Selected Reviews on Literature and Civilization

During William Gilmore Simms’s life (1806–1870), book reviews and critical essays became vital parts of American literary culture and intellectual discourse. Simms was an assiduous reviewer and essayist, proving by example the importance of those genres. William Gilmore Simms’s Selected Reviews on Literature and Civilization publishes for the first time in book form sixty-two examples of the writer’s hundreds of newspaper and periodical reviews and book notes as well as four important critical essays. Together, the reviews and essays reveal the regional, national, and international dimensions of Simms’s intellectual interests. To frame the two distinct parts of Selected Reviews, James Everett Kibler, Jr., and David Moltke-Hansen have written a general introduction that considers the development of book reviewing and the authorship of essays in cultural and historical contexts. In part one, Kibler offers an introduction that examines Simms’s reviewing habits and the aesthetic and critical values that informed the author’s reviews. Kibler then publishes selected texts of reviews and provides historical and cultural backgrounds for each selection. Simms was an early proponent of the critical theories of Romantics such as William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Edgar Allan Poe. Widely read in European history and literature, he reviewed works published in French, German, and classics in original Greek and Latin and in translation. Simms also was an early, ardent advocate of works of local color and of southern “backwoods” humorists of his day. Simms published notices of seven of Herman Melville’s novels, the writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson, and favorably reviewed Henry David Thoreau’s Walden; or, Life in the Woods. Simms published numerous review essays of twenty thousand or more words in literary journals and also republished two collections in book form. These volumes treated such subjects as Americanism in literature and the American Revolution in South Carolina. Yet, as part two of Selected Reviews demonstrates, Simms ranged much more widely in the intellectual milieu. Such cultural and political topics as the 1848 revolution in France, the history of the literary essay, the roles of women in the American Revolution, and the activities of the southern convention in Nashville in 1850 captured Simms’s attention. Moltke-Hansen’s introduction to part two examines Simms’s roles in, and responses to, the Romantic critical revolution and the other revolutions then roiling Europe and America.

Constructions of Agency in American Literature on the War of Independence

Visions of Order in William Gilmore Simms: Southern Conservatism and the Other American Romance. Columbia: U of South Carolina P, 2009. Napoleon. “Maxims, Geopolitics.” The Art of War in World History: From Antiquity to the Nuclear Age.

Constructions of Agency in American Literature on the War of Independence

This book argues that the negotiation of agency is central not only to the experience of war but also to its representation in cultural expressions, ranging from a notion of disablement, expressed in victimization, immobilization, traumatization, and death, to enablement, expressed in the perpetration of heroic, courageous, skillful, and powerful actions of assertion and dominance. In order to illustrate this thesis, it provides a comprehensive analysis of literary representations of the American War of Independence from 1775, the beginning of the war, up until roughly 1860, when the Civil War marked a decisive historical turning point. As the first national war, it has an unquestionably exemplary status for the development of American conceptions of war. The in-depth study of exemplary texts from a variety of genres and by authors like Thomas Paine, Benjamin Franklin, James Fenimore Cooper, Catharine Sedgwick, William Gilmore Simms, and Herman Melville, demonstrates that the overall character of Revolutionary War literature presents the war as a forum in which collective and individual agency is expressed, defended, and cultivated. It uses the military environment in order to teach the values of discipline and self-subordination to a communal good, which are perceived as basic principles of a Republican virtue to guide the actions of the autonomous individual in a popular democracy.

Studies in the Literary Imagination

If Pearce alludes to Simms's romantic idea of the poet providing meta- physics to the community , the last two essays return the focus directly to Simms's literary ... So , these varied approaches to " The World in William Gilmore Simms ...

Studies in the Literary Imagination


William Gilmore Simms and the American Frontier

cultural antecedents , Bancroft and Simms were joining in the effort to shift attention from recent ideological incompatibilities ... Yet Simms and Bancroft kept on in the veins that they had opened earlier , writing out their visions .

William Gilmore Simms and the American Frontier

William Gilmore Simms (1807-1870), the antebellum South's foremost author and cultural critic, was the first advocate of regionalism in the creation of national literature. This collection of essays emphasizes his portrayal of America's westward migration.

The Vision of Cortes Cain and Other Poems

William Gilmore Simms. THE VISION OF CORTES , CAIN , AND OTHER POEMS . By W. GILMORE SIMMS , JR . Charleston : JAMES S. BURGES , 44 QUEEN - STREET . 1829 . 48 . 180 TO JAMES L. PETIGRU , ESQ .

The Vision of Cortes  Cain  and Other Poems


Conservatism and Southern Intellectuals 1789 1861

Trent, William P. William Gilmore Simms. ... Watson, Charles S. From Nationalism to Secessionism: The Changing Fiction of William Gilmore Simms. Westport, Conn. ... Visions of Order: The Cultural Crisis of Our Time. Wilmington, Del.

Conservatism and Southern Intellectuals  1789 1861


Safeguarding a Truly Catholic Vision of the World

theoretical task before them: they must come to understand in order to act. ... Sabbath Lyrics: A Christmas Gift of Love By William Gilmore Simms Topic Title Scripture Mixed blessings and woes The Sacred Minstrel isa 30 The Church at ...

Safeguarding a Truly Catholic Vision of the World

A. J. Conyers (1944-2004) was a Baptist theologian with wide-ranging interests and a founding faculty member of the George W. Truett Seminary at Baylor University. He published books ranging from basic Christian doctrine to political theology, but his many essays show his true range and depth of insight. This work collects ten of his most important and provocative essays in order to introduce Conyers--who died of cancer in 2004--to theologians and pastors unfamiliar with his contribution to the theological task of the church.

A Spreading and Abiding Hope

And he did so not in order to lead men to that place (as thousands of pilgrims thought), but in order to lead them to their ... choices of theological method and visions of the world generated by figures such as William Gilmore Simms, ...

A Spreading and Abiding Hope

Every tradition has its surprising voices, its thinkers who look at things slightly differently than most. Evangelicalism is no exception. Many surprising evangelical voices end up being embarrassments of one sort or another: everyone can choose their favorite example of this phenomenon! Rather than seeking to expose these sorts of negative surprises, this book explores the surprising voice of the late evangelical theologian A. J. Conyers. Conyers's political theology is a resource for a robust evangelical theopolitical imagination. By learning from Conyers, evangelicals can overcome common weaknesses and engage in a more thoroughly Christian, biblical, and evangelical approach to the modern world and its various institutions and challenges. Conyers speaks beyond evangelicalism as well. His vision of the modern world, including its development and major challenges, provides insight into contemporary political theology. His work on the nation-state, free-market capitalism, and the notions of toleration and vocation speaks into and advances important debates. Thus Conyers's evangelical political theology provides both the evangelical tradition itself, as well as political theology as a broader discipline, with a compelling and challenging vision.

Pirates and Devils

William Gilmore Simms's Unfinished Postbellum Novels Nicholas G. Meriwether, David W. Newton. occasions that he wishes only to heighten ... While Silex remains suspicious of Sir Will's motives, the visions he receives are not illusions.

Pirates and Devils

Pirates and Devils, edited by Nicholas G. Meriwether and David W. Newton, presents two of the most significant unfinished works by William Gilmore Simms, a prominent public intellectual of the antebellum South and one of the most prolific literary writers of the nineteenth century. These two incomplete works—the pirate romance, “The Brothers of the Coast,” and the folk fable, “Sir Will O’ Wisp”—are representative of the some of the last major primary texts of Simms’s expansive career. Recent scholarship about Simms, including William Gilmore Simms’s Unfinished Civil War, reasserts the significance of Simms’s postwar writing and makes this volume’s contribution timely. Left unfinished at his death, these two substantial fragments represent the last of the major primary texts from the final phase of Simms’s life to be published. Together, the texts provide greater insight into Simms’s creative process, but more importantly, they show Simms continuing to wrestle with the issues he faced in the aftermath of the Civil War, and they document the creativity and courage that commitment represented—and required. The publication of these fragments makes possible a complete picture of this last phase of Simms’s life, as he struggled with the consequences of a conflict that had become the defining event of his life, career, and region.