Voyage of the Sable Venus

This National Book Award-winning debut poetry collection is a "powerfully evocative" (The New York Review of Books) meditation on the black female figure through time.

Voyage of the Sable Venus

This National Book Award-winning debut poetry collection is a "powerfully evocative" (The New York Review of Books) meditation on the black female figure through time. Robin Coste Lewis's electrifying collection is a triptych that begins and ends with lyric poems meditating on the roles desire and race play in the construction of the self. In the center of the collection is the title poem, "Voyage of the Sable Venus," an amazing narrative made up entirely of titles of artworks from ancient times to the present—titles that feature or in some way comment on the black female figure in Western art. Bracketed by Lewis's own autobiographical poems, "Voyage" is a tender and shocking meditation on the fragmentary mysteries of stereotype, juxtaposing our names for things with what we actually see and know. A new understanding of biography and the self, this collection questions just where, historically, do ideas about the black female figure truly begin—five hundred years ago, five thousand, or even longer? And what role did art play in this ancient, often heinous story? Here we meet a poet who adores her culture and the beauty to be found within it. Yet she is also a cultural critic alert to the nuances of race and desire—how they define us all, including her own sometimes painful history. Lewis's book is a thrilling aesthetic anthem to the complexity of race—a full embrace of its pleasure and horror, in equal parts.

Exploring the Black Venus Figure in Aesthetic Practices

poetry to Robin Coste Lewis for her Voyage of the Sable Venus and Other Poems. Lewis' highly experimental title poem may exemplify a new direction in the politics of Black Venus aesthetics, exploring the parameters of and opportunities ...

Exploring the Black Venus Figure in Aesthetic Practices

Tracing the figure of Black Venus in literature and visual arts from different periods and geographies, Exploring the Black Venus Figure in Aesthetic Practices discusses how aesthetic practices may restore the racialized female body in feminist, anti-racist and postcolonial terms.

Contested Records

The Turn to Documents in Contemporary North American Poetry Michael Leong ... titles The Voyage of the Sable Venus, from Angola to the West Indies and Voyage of the Sable Venus and Other Poems, which suggest two differentitineraries.

Contested Records

Contested Records analyzes how some of the most well-known twenty-first century North American poets work with fraught documents. Whether it's the legal paperwork detailing the murder of 132 African captives, state transcriptions of the last words of death row inmates, or testimony from miners and rescue workers about a fatal mine disaster, author Michael Leong reveals that much of the power of contemporary poetry rests in its potential to select, adapt, evaluate, and extend public documentation.

Women Writing Across Cultures

Book Award-winning collection Voyage of the Sable Venus and Other Poems. Its title invokes the 1765 poem “The Voyage of the Sable Venus,” a text by Isaac Teale implicitly celebrating the opportunities for white male sexual violence ...

Women Writing Across Cultures

This collection brings together an international, multicultural, multilingual, and multidisciplinary community of scholars and practitioners in different media seeking to question and re-theorize the contested terms of our title: “woman,” “writing,” “women’s writing,” and “across.” “Culture” is translated into an open series of interconnected terms and questions. How might one write across national cultures; or across a national and a minority culture; or across disciplines, genres, and media; or across synchronic discourses that are unequal in power; or across present and past discourses or present and future discourses? The collection explores and develops recent feminist, queer, and transgender theory and criticism, and also aesthetic practice. “Writing across” assumes a number of orientations: posthumanist; transtemporal; transnationalist; writing across discourses, disciplines, media, genres, genders; writing across pronouns – he, she, they; writing across literature, non-literary texts, and life. This book was originally published as a special issue of Angelaki: Journal of the Theoretical Humanities.

The Selling and Self Regulation of Contemporary Poetry

collections whose author's established presence online or in other published forms means that a so-called debut can ... the US National Book Award for Poetry since 1975 (Robin Coste Lewis's Voyage of the Sable Venus and Other Poems).

The Selling and Self Regulation of Contemporary Poetry

The Selling and Self-Regulation of Contemporary Poetry is the first book-length study of the contemporary poetry industry. By documenting radical changes over the past decade in the way poems are published, sold, and consumed, it connects the seemingly small world of poetry with the other, wider creative industries. In reassessing an art form that has been traditionally seen as free from or even resistant to material concerns, the book confronts the real pressures – and real opportunities – faced by poets and publishers in the wake of economic and cultural shifts since 2008. The changing role of anthologies, prizes, and publishers are considered alongside new technologies, new arts policy, and re-conceptions of poetic labour. Ultimately, it argues that poetry’s continued growth and diversification also leaves individuals with more responsibility than ever for sustaining its communities.

Poets Writers Complete Guide to Being A Writer

Poet Robin Coste Lewis, whose debut collection, Voyage of the Sable Venus and Other Poems, won a National Book Award, has a story of turning to poetry that has much in common with the stories of Roy-Bornstein and Akbar.

Poets   Writers Complete Guide to Being A Writer

For half a century, writers at every stage of their careers have turned to the literary nonprofit organization Poets & Writers for help with their professional development. In this book Poets & Writers provides the authoritative guide for writers that answers every imaginable question about craft and career. From kickstarting your creativity and developing your style to getting your work read and published, this is the bible for authors of all genres and forms. Written by Kevin Larimer and Mary Gannon, the two most recent editors of Poets & Writers Magazine, this book brings an unrivaled understanding of the areas in which writers seek guidance and support. Filled with insider information like sample query letters, pitch letters, lists of resources, and worksheets for calculating freelance rates, tracking submissions, and managing your taxes, the guide does more than demystify the writing life-it also provides an array of powerful tools for building a sustainable career as a writer. In addition to the wealth of insights into creativity, publishing, and promotion are first-person essays from bestselling authors, including George Saunders, Christina Baker Kline, and Ocean Vuong, as well as reading lists from award-winning writers such as Anthony Doerr, Cheryl Strayed, and Natalie Diaz. Here, at last, is the ultimate comprehensive resource that belongs on every writer's desk

Infamous Bodies

Voyage of the Sable Venus and Other Poems. New York: Knopf. Lightfoot, Natasha, 2015. Troubling Freedom: Antigua and the Aftermath of British Emancipation. Durham, NC: Duke University Press. Lindfors, Bernth. 2014.

Infamous Bodies

The countless retellings and reimaginings of the private and public lives of Phillis Wheatley, Sally Hemings, Sarah Baartman, Mary Seacole, and Sarah Forbes Bonetta have transformed them into difficult cultural and black feminist icons. In Infamous Bodies, Samantha Pinto explores how histories of these black women and their ongoing fame generate new ways of imagining black feminist futures. Drawing on a variety of media, cultural, legal, and critical sources, Pinto shows how the narratives surrounding these eighteenth- and nineteenth-century celebrities shape key political concepts such as freedom, consent, contract, citizenship, and sovereignty. Whether analyzing Wheatley's fame in relation to conceptions of race and freedom, notions of consent in Hemings's relationship with Thomas Jefferson, or Baartman's ability to enter into legal contracts, Pinto reveals the centrality of race, gender, and sexuality in the formation of political rights. In so doing, she contends that feminist theories of black women's vulnerable embodiment can be the starting point for future progressive political projects.

Ancient Greek Lists

Kyriakou, I. (2017) “Female Ancestors in the Hesiodic Catalogue of Women,” in Poetry in Fragments: Studies on the Hesiodic Corpus and Its Afterlife, ed. C. Tsagalis. ... Lewis, R. C. (2015) Voyage of the Sable Venus and Other Poems.

Ancient Greek Lists

Ancient Greek Lists brings together catalogic texts from a variety of genres, arguing that the list form was the ancient mode of expressing value through text. Ranging from Homer's Catalogue of Ships through Attic comedy and Hellenistic poetry to temple inventories, the book draws connections among texts seldom juxtaposed, examining the ways in which lists can stand in for objects, create value, act as methods of control, and even approximate the infinite. Athena Kirk analyzes how lists come to stand as a genre in their own right, shedding light on both under-studied and well-known sources to engage scholars and students of Classical literature, ancient history, and ancient languages.

Antigone Rising

Robin Coste Hughes, Voyage of the Sable Venus and Other Poems (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2017). See also Dan Chiasson, “Rebirth of Venus: Robin Coste Lewis's Historical Art,” New Yorker, ...

Antigone Rising

A witty, inspiring reckoning with the ancient Greek and Roman myths and their legacy, from what they can illuminate about #MeToo to the radical imagery of Beyoncé. The picture of classical antiquity most of us learned in school is framed in certain ways -- glossing over misogyny while omitting the seeds of feminist resistance. Many of today's harmful practices, like school dress codes, exploitation of the environment, and rape culture, have their roots in the ancient world. But in Antigone Rising, classicist Helen Morales reminds us that the myths have subversive power because they are told -- and read -- in different ways. Through these stories, whether it's Antigone's courageous stand against tyranny or the indestructible Caeneus, who inspires trans and gender queer people today, Morales uncovers hidden truths about solidarity, empowerment, and catharsis. Antigone Rising offers a fresh understanding of the stories we take for granted, showing how we can reclaim them to challenge the status quo, spark resistance, and rail against unjust regimes.

Who Will Pay Reparations on My Soul Essays

Voyage of the Sable Venus and Other Poems. New York: Alfred Knopf, 2017. Löwy, Michael. Redemption and Utopia: Jewish Libertarian Thought in Central Europe. New York: Verso, 2017. Nyong'o, Tavia. Afro-Fabulations: The Queer Drama of ...

Who Will Pay Reparations on My Soul   Essays

"This is a very smart and soulful book. Jesse McCarthy is a terrific essayist." —Zadie Smith New York Times • "New Books to Watch For in March" A supremely talented young critic’s essays on race and culture, from Toni Morrison to trap, herald the arrival of a major new voice in American letters. Ranging from Ta-Nehisi Coates’s case for reparations to Toni Morrison’s revolutionary humanism to D’Angelo’s simmering blend of R&B and racial justice, Jesse McCarthy’s bracing essays investigate with virtuosic intensity the art, music, literature, and political stances that have defined the twenty-first century. Even as our world has suffered through successive upheavals, McCarthy contends, “something was happening in the world of culture: a surging and unprecedented visibility at every level of black art making.” Who Will Pay Reparations on My Soul? reckons with this resurgence, arguing for the central role of art and intellectual culture in an age of widening inequality and moral crisis. McCarthy reinvigorates the essay form as a space not only for argument but for experimental writing that mixes and chops the old ways into new ones. In “Notes on Trap,” he borrows a conceit from Susan Sontag to reveal the social and political significance of trap music, the drug-soaked strain of Southern hip-hop that, as he puts it, is “the funeral music that the Reagan Revolution deserves.” In “Back in the Day,” McCarthy, a black American raised in France, evokes his childhood in Paris through an elegiac account of French rap in the 1990s. In “The Master’s Tools,” the relationship between Spanish painter Diego Velázquez and his acolyte-slave, Juan de Pareja, becomes the lens through which Kehinde Wiley’s paintings are viewed, while “To Make a Poet Black” explores the hidden blackness of Sappho and the erotic power of Phillis Wheatley. Essays on John Edgar Wideman, Claudia Rankine, and Colson Whitehead survey the state of black letters. In his title essay, McCarthy takes on the question of reparations, arguing that true progress will not come until Americans remake their institutions in the service of true equality. As he asks, “What can reparations mean when the damage cannot be accounted for in the only system of accounting that a society recognizes?” For readers of Teju Cole’s Known and Strange Things and Mark Greif’s Against Everything, McCarthy’s essays portray a brilliant young critic at work, making sense of our disjointed times while seeking to transform our understanding of race and art, identity and representation.

Runaway Genres

See also Christina Sharpe, In the Wake: On Blackness and Being (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2016). 29 Robin Coste Lewis, Voyage of the Sable Venus and Other Poems (New York: Knopf, 2015), 35, further citations in text.

Runaway Genres

Argues that the slave narrative is a new world literary genre In Runaway Genres, Yogita Goyal tracks the emergence of slavery as the defining template through which current forms of human rights abuses are understood. The post-black satire of Paul Beatty and Mat Johnson, modern slave narratives from Sudan to Sierra Leone, and the new Afropolitan diaspora of writers like Teju Cole and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie all are woven into Goyal’s argument for the slave narrative as a new world literary genre, exploring the full complexity of this new ethical globalism. From the humanitarian spectacles of Kony 2012 and #BringBackOurGirls through gothic literature, Runaway Genres unravels, for instance, how and why the African child soldier has now appeared as the afterlife of the Atlantic slave. Goyal argues that in order to fathom forms of freedom and bondage today—from unlawful detention to sex trafficking to the refugee crisis to genocide—we must turn to contemporary literature, which reveals how the literary forms used to tell these stories derive from the antebellum genre of the slave narrative. Exploring the ethics and aesthetics of globalism, the book presents alternative conceptions of human rights, showing that the revival and proliferation of slave narratives offers not just an occasion to revisit the Atlantic past, but also for re-narrating the global present. In reassessing these legacies and their ongoing relation to race and the human, Runaway Genres creates a new map with which to navigate contemporary black diaspora literature.

The Pornography of Meat New and Updated Edition

“Epilogue: Boarding the Voyage.” Voyage of the Sable Venus and Other Poems. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. Lighter, J. E. 1994. Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang. New York: Random House. Lloyd, Genevieve. 1984.

The Pornography of Meat  New and Updated Edition

For 30 years, since the publication of her landmark book The Sexual Politics of Meat, Carol J. Adams and her readers have continued to document and hold to account the degrading interplay of language about women, domesticated animals, and meat in advertising, politics, and media. Serving as sequel and visual companion, The Pornography of Meat charts the continued influence of this language and the fight against it. This new edition includes more than 300 images, most of them new, and brings the book up to date to include expressions of misogyny in online media and advertising, the #MeToo movement, and the impact of Donald Trump and white supremacy on our political language. Never has this book--or Adams's analysis--been more relevant.

Anarchaeologies

In Voyage of the Sable Venus and Other Poems, 129–31. New York: Knopf, 2015. Critchley, Simon. Infinitely Demanding: Ethics of Commitment, Politics of Resistance. London: Verso, 2012. Davis, Todd F., and Kenneth Womack, eds.

Anarchaeologies

How do we read after the so-called death of literature? If we are to attend to the proclamations that the representational apparatuses of literature and politics are dead, what aesthetic, ethical, and political possibilities remain for us today? Our critical moment, Graff Zivin argues, demands anarchaeological reading: reading for the blind spots, errors, points of opacity or untranslatability in works of philosophy and art. Rather than applying concepts from philosophy in order to understand or elucidate cultural works, the book exposes works of philosophy, literary theory, narrative, poetry, film, and performance art and activism to one another. Working specifically with art, film, and literature from Argentina (Jorge Luis Borges, Juán José Saer, Ricardo Piglia, César Aira, Albertina Carri, the Internacional Errorista), Graff Zivin allows such thinkers as Levinas, Derrida, Badiou, and Rancière to be inflected by Latin American cultural production. Through these acts of interdiscursive and interdisciplinary (or indisciplinary) exposure, such ethical and political concepts as identification and recognition, decision and event, sovereignty and will, are read as constitutively impossible, erroneous. Rather than weakening either ethics or politics, however, the anarchaeological reading these works stage and demand opens up and radicalizes the possibility of justice.

The Routledge Companion to African American Art History

3 Robin Coste Lewis, Voyage of the Sable Venus and Other Poems (New York: Knopf, 2017). 4 Gwendolyn DuBois Shaw, “Andrew Wyeth's Black Paintings,” in Andrew Wyeth: In Retrospect, edited by Patricia Junker and Audrey Lewis (New Haven, ...

The Routledge Companion to African American Art History

This Companion authoritatively points to the main areas of enquiry within the subject of African American art history. The first section examines how African American art has been constructed over the course of a century of published scholarship. The second section studies how African American art is and has been taught and researched in academia. The third part focuses on how African American art has been reflected in art galleries and museums. The final section opens up understandings of what we mean when we speak of African American art. This book will be of interest to graduate students, researchers, and professors and may be used in American art, African American art, visual culture, and culture classes.

1 000 Books to Read Before You Die

... 195, 196, 385–86, 554, 823–24 Virgil (David R. Slavitt), 824 Virgil: A Study in Civilized Poetry (Brooks Otis), ... 863, 874 The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (C. S. Lewis), 486 Voyage of the Sable Venus and Other Poems (Robin Coste ...

1 000 Books to Read Before You Die

“The ultimate literary bucket list.” —THE WASHINGTON POST Celebrate the pleasure of reading and the thrill of discovering new titles in an extraordinary book that’s as compulsively readable, entertaining, surprising, and enlightening as the 1,000-plus titles it recommends. Covering fiction, poetry, science and science fiction, memoir, travel writing, biography, children’s books, history, and more, 1,000 Books to Read Before You Die ranges across cultures and through time to offer an eclectic collection of works that each deserve to come with the recommendation, You have to read this. But it’s not a proscriptive list of the “great works”—rather, it’s a celebration of the glorious mosaic that is our literary heritage. Flip it open to any page and be transfixed by a fresh take on a very favorite book. Or come across a title you always meant to read and never got around to. Or, like browsing in the best kind of bookshop, stumble on a completely unknown author and work, and feel that tingle of discovery. There are classics, of course, and unexpected treasures, too. Lists to help pick and choose, like Offbeat Escapes, or A Long Climb, but What a View. And its alphabetical arrangement by author assures that surprises await on almost every turn of the page, with Cormac McCarthy and The Road next to Robert McCloskey and Make Way for Ducklings, Alice Walker next to Izaac Walton. There are nuts and bolts, too—best editions to read, other books by the author, “if you like this, you’ll like that” recommendations , and an interesting endnote of adaptations where appropriate. Add it all up, and in fact there are more than six thousand titles by nearly four thousand authors mentioned—a life-changing list for a lifetime of reading. “948 pages later, you still want more!” —THE WASHINGTON POST

The Poetry of Slavery

Contents of Part I 7 30 36 48 53 67 James Grainger , The Sugar Cane : A Poem . In Four Books , Book IV ( 1764 ) Isaac Teale , The Voyage of the Sable Venus from Angola to the West Indies ( 1765 ) Thomas Day and John Bicknell , The Dying ...

The Poetry of Slavery

This volume collects the most important works of poetry generated by English and North American slavery, mixing poetry by the major Anglo-American Romantic poets with curious, and sometimes brilliant, verse by a range of now forgotten literary figures.

Best American Poetry 2016

ROBIN COSTE LEWIS is the author of Voyage of the Sable Venus (Alfred A. Knopf, 2015), which won the 2015 National Book Award in poetry. She is a Provost's Fellow in poetry and visual studies at the University of Southern California.

Best American Poetry 2016

The premier anthology of contemporary American poetry continues—guest edited this year by award-winning poet Edward Hirsch, a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets and the president of The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. The Best American Poetry series is “a vivid snapshot of what a distinguished poet finds exciting, fresh and memorable” (Robert Pinsky); a guiding light for the mood and shape of modern American poetry. Each year, this series presents essential American verse and the poets who create it. Truly the “best” American poetry has appeared in this venerable collection for over twenty-five years. A poet of decided brilliance since his 1981 debut collection, For the Sleepwalkers, Edward Hirsch curates a thoughtful selection of poetry for 2016 and an Introduction to be savored. Jumpha Lahiri said of Hirsch, “The trademarks of his poems are…to be intimate but restrained, to be tender without being sentimental, to witness life without flinching, and above all, to isolate and preserve those details of our existence so often overlooked, so easily forgotten, so essential to our souls.” Hirsch’s choices for this collection reflect the soul of poetry in America. As ever, series editor David Lehman opens this year’s edition with an insider’s guide and a thoughtful contemplation of poetry today.

Beginning at the End

Stéphane Mallarmé, “Le tombeau d'Edgar Poe,” in Collected Poems and Other Verse, trans. ... Robin Coste Lewis, “The Wilde Woman of Aiken,” in Voyage of the Sable Venus (New York: Knopf, 2016), 17. 34. Ibid., 17–18. 35.

Beginning at the End

During the struggle for decolonization, Frantz Fanon argued that artists who mimicked European aestheticism were “beginning at the end,” skipping the inventive phase of youth for a decadence thought more typical of Europe’s declining empires. Robert Stilling takes up Fanon’s assertion to argue that decadence became a key idea in postcolonial thought, describing both the failures of revolutionary nationalism and the assertion of new cosmopolitan ideas about poetry and art. In Stilling’s account, anglophone postcolonial artists have reshaped modernist forms associated with the idea of art for art’s sake and often condemned as decadent. By reading decadent works by J. K. Huysmans, Walter Pater, Henry James, and Oscar Wilde alongside Chinua Achebe, Derek Walcott, Agha Shahid Ali, Derek Mahon, Yinka Shonibare, Wole Soyinka, and Bernardine Evaristo, Stilling shows how postcolonial artists reimagined the politics of aestheticism in the service of anticolonial critique. He also shows how fin de siècle figures such as Wilde questioned the imperial ideologies of their own era. Like their European counterparts, postcolonial artists have had to negotiate between the imaginative demands of art and the pressure to conform to a revolutionary politics seemingly inseparable from realism. Beginning at the End argues that both groups—European decadents and postcolonial artists—maintained commitments to artifice while fostering oppositional politics. It asks that we recognize what aestheticism has contributed to politically engaged postcolonial literature. At the same time, Stilling breaks down the boundaries around decadent literature, taking it outside of Europe and emphasizing the global reach of its imaginative transgressions.

Arts Integration

In 2015, Robin Coste Lewis was the National Book Award Winner for poetry. Her book, Voyage of the Sable Venus, is an amazing reflection through poetry on the cultural depiction of the black female figure in artworks from ancient times ...

Arts Integration

Practical and engaging, Merryl Goldberg’s popular guide to integrating the arts throughout the K-12 curriculum blends contemporary theory with classroom practice. Beyond teaching about the arts as a subject in and of itself, the text explains how teachers may integrate the arts—literary, media, visual, and performing—throughout subject area curriculum and provides a multitude of strategies and examples. Promoting ways to develop children's creativity and critical thinking while also developing communications skills and fostering collaborative opportunities, it looks at assessment and the arts, engaging English Language Learners, and using the arts to teach academic skills. This text is ideal as a primer on arts integration and a foundational support for teaching, learning, and assessment, especially within the context of multicultural and multilingual classrooms. In-depth discussions of the role of arts integration in meeting the goals of Title I programs, including academic achievement, student engagement, school climate and parental involvement, are woven throughout the text, as is the role of the arts in meeting state and federal student achievement standards. Changes in the 5th Edition: New chapter on arts as text, arts integration, and arts education and their place within the context of teaching and learning in multiple subject classrooms in multicultural and multilingual settings; Title I and arts integration (focus on student academic achievement, student engagement, school climate, and parental involvement–the 4 cornerstones of Title I); Attention to the National Core Arts Standards as well as their relationship to other standardized tests and arts integration; more (and more recent) research-based studies integrated throughout; Examples of how to plan arts integrated lessons (using backward design) along with more examples from classrooms’; Updated references, examples, and lesson plans/units; Companion Website: www.routledge.com/cw/goldberg

Bound to Appear

... a poem in Four parts in poems on the Abolition of the Slave trade (london: robert Bowyer, 1809). engraving. ... the Voyage of the Sable Venus (illustration for Bryan edwards, the History, Civil and Commercial, of the British ...

Bound to Appear

A smart account of a defining moment in African American contemporary art. The early 1990s were a game changer for black artists. Many rose prominently to lead the field of advanced art more generally--artists like Glenn Ligon, Renee Green, Fred Wilson, Lorna Simpson and others. It was in the early 1990s when African American artists began to produce installation and conceptual work, where previously, as an identity group, they had focused on figurative painting and craft work. Now, suddently, artists were producing site specific installations, sound art, performance, and readymades that sought to immerse the viewer in environments that provoked the experience of slavery and raised awareness of the constructedness of "blackness" in this country.