Walking the Amazon

Jaw-dropping from start to finish, Walking the Amazon is the unforgettable and gripping story of an unprecedented adventure. Walking the Amazon is also available as a Spanish edition entitled Caminado El Amazonas.

Walking the Amazon

From the star of Discovery Channel's Naked and Marooned comes a a riveting, adventurous account of one man’s history-making journey along the entire length of the Amazon—and through the most bio-diverse habitat on Earth. Fans of Turn Right at Machu Piccu and readers of Jon Krakauer and Bill Bryson and will revel in Ed Stafford's extraordinary prose and lush descriptions. In April 2008, Ed Stafford set off to become the first man ever to walk the entire length of the Amazon. He started on the Pacific coast of Peru, crossed the Andes Mountain range to find the official source of the river. His journey lead on through parts of Colombia and right across Brazil; all while outwitting dangerous animals, machete wielding indigenous people as well as negotiating injuries, weather and his own fears and doubts. Yet, Stafford was undeterred. On his grueling 860-day, 4,000-plus mile journey, Stafford witnessed the devastation of deforestation firsthand, the pressure on tribes due to loss of habitats as well as nature in its true-raw form. Jaw-dropping from start to finish, Walking the Amazon is the unforgettable and gripping story of an unprecedented adventure. Walking the Amazon is also available as a Spanish edition entitled Caminado El Amazonas.

Walking the Amazon

Ultimately though, Walking the Amazon is an account of a world-first expedition that takes readers on the most daring journey along the world's greatest river and through the most bio-diverse habitat on earth.

Walking the Amazon

In April 2008, Ed Stafford began his attempt to become the first man ever to walk the entire length of the River Amazon. Nearly two and a half years later, he had crossed the whole of South America to reach the mouth of the colossal river. With danger a constant companion - outwitting alligators, jaguars, pit vipers and electric eels, not to mention overcoming the hurdles of injuries and relentless tropical storms - Ed's journey demanded extreme physical and mental strength. Often warned by natives that he would die, Ed even found himself pursued by machete-wielding tribesmen and detained for murder. However, Ed's journey was an adventure with a purpose: to help raise people's awareness of environmental issues. Ed had unprecedented access to indigenous communities and witnessed the devastating effects of the deforestation of the Amazon rainforest first-hand. His story of disappearing tribes and loss of habitats concerns us all. Ultimately though, Walking the Amazon is an account of a world-first expedition that takes readers on the most daring journey along the world's greatest river and through the most bio-diverse habitat on earth.

Walking the Amazon

For him. fishing was a distraction from the monotony of the walk but this time I suspected such perseverance was his way of ... Once paved. it cut a scar through the Amazon rainforest from Manaus to Porto Velho in the south-west.

Walking the Amazon

In April 2008, Ed Stafford began his attempt to become the first man ever to walk the entire length of the River Amazon. Nearly two and a half years later, he had crossed the whole of South America to reach the mouth of the colossal river. With danger a constant companion - outwitting alligators, jaguars, pit vipers and electric eels, not to mention overcoming the hurdles of injuries and relentless tropical storms - Ed's journey demanded extreme physical and mental strength. Often warned by natives that he would die, Ed even found himself pursued by machete-wielding tribesmen and detained for murder. However, Ed's journey was an adventure with a purpose: to help raise people's awareness of environmental issues. Ed had unprecedented access to indigenous communities and witnessed the devastating effects of the deforestation of the Amazon rainforest first-hand. His story of disappearing tribes and loss of habitats concerns us all. Ultimately though, Walking the Amazon is an account of a world-first expedition that takes readers on the most daring journey along the world's greatest river and through the most bio-diverse habitat on earth.

Epic Expeditions

Explorer and survival expert Ed Stafford looks at 25 of the greatest expeditions in history and what it takes to survive mentally and physically.

Epic Expeditions

Explorer and survival expert Ed Stafford looks at 25 of the greatest expeditions in history and what it takes to survive mentally and physically.

Naked and Marooned

This epic story of survival, full of exhilarating highs and devastating lows, is told with raw emotion and captivating honesty. This book will leave you amazed and exhausted.

Naked and Marooned

‘I stood on the beach truly alone for the first time. I would not see another person for sixty days. I was on an uninhabited tropical island and I had nothing with me to help me survive. No food, no equipment, no knife and not even any clothes. All I had was my camera kit so that I could intimately record my self-inflicted sentence.’ What if you were abandoned on a tropical island with no food or water, no basic equipment, not even a knife, and no clothes – could you survive? Extreme adventurer Ed Stafford isn’t sure, but he’s about to find out as he pushes himself to the limit in this gripping and inspirational test of human survival. For sixty days, with only his explorer’s instinct and a video camera to record his experiences, Ed faces the ultimate feat of physical and mental endurance. He confronts blazing heat and brutal loneliness; eats snails to escape starvation and battles illness, dehydration and fatigue in what is his most dangerous, and at times life-threatening, challenge to date. This epic story of survival, full of exhilarating highs and devastating lows, is told with raw emotion and captivating honesty. This book will leave you amazed and exhausted.

Walking the Forest with Chico Mendes

Now, Walking the Forest with Chico Mendes makes this important work available to new audiences, capturing the events and trends that shaped the lives of both men and the fragile system of public security and justice within which they lived ...

Walking the Forest with Chico Mendes

A close associate of Chico Mendes, Gomercindo Rodrigues witnessed the struggle between Brazil's rubber tappers and local ranchers—a struggle that led to the murder of Mendes. Rodrigues's memoir of his years with Mendes has never before been translated into English from the Portuguese. Now, Walking the Forest with Chico Mendes makes this important work available to new audiences, capturing the events and trends that shaped the lives of both men and the fragile system of public security and justice within which they lived and worked. In a rare primary account of the celebrated labor organizer, Rodrigues chronicles Mendes's innovative proposals as the Amazon faced wholesale deforestation. As a labor unionist and an environmentalist, Mendes believed that rain forests could be preserved without ruining the lives of workers, and that destroying forests to make way for cattle pastures threatened humanity in the long run. Walking the Forest with Chico Mendes also brings to light the unexplained and uninvestigated events surrounding Mendes's murder. Although many historians have written about the plantation systems of nineteenth-century Brazil, few eyewitnesses have captured the rich rural history of the twentieth century with such an intricate knowledge of history and folklore as Rodrigues.

Expeditions Unpacked

Walking the Amazon Unpacked Expedition: Walking the Amazon Date: 2008–2010 Length: 860 days 9 4 5 7 15 14 16 12 10 11 17 13 19 20 21 18 23 24 25 6 22 Ed Stafford Born: 26 December 1975, UK As a restless schoolboy I was always fascinated ...

Expeditions Unpacked

“A fascinating and unique look at these celebrated expeditions. Ed Stafford knows all too well how important an explorer’s kit can be and this brilliant book gives great insight into the role it plays.” —Sir Ranulph Fiennes In this unique and enthralling book, explorer and survivalist Ed Stafford curates 25 great expeditions through the lens of the kit these remarkable explorers took with them. In an environment where lack of preparation could mean certain death, the equipment carried, ridden and sailed into uncharted territories could mean the success or failure of an expedition. Was it simply a case of better provisions and preparation that helped Amundsen beat Scott to the South Pole? And how has the equipment taken to Everest changed since Hillary’s first ascent? Through carefully curated photographs and specially commissioned illustrations we can see at a glance the scale, style and complexity of the items taken into the unknown by the greatest explorers of all time, and the impact each item had on their journey. How it potentially saved a life, or was purely for comfort or entertainment, and how these objects of survival have evolved and adapted as science advances, and we plunge further into the extremes. Conquering fears and mountains, adversity and wild jungles, each item these explorers flew, pulled or hauled played a crucial role in their ambitious and dangerous missions to find out a little more about our world. Through each of these objects, we can gain a better understanding ourselves. Get an intimate view of these and more amazing expeditions: Roald Amundsen, race to the Pole: Norwegian expedition (snowshoes, Primus stove, piano, violin, gramophone…) Amelia Earhart, first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean (Bendix radio direction finder, parachutes, emergency life raft, rouge…) Tim Slessor, first overland from London to Singapore (machetes, crowbar, typewriter, Remington dry shaver, tea…) Nellie Bly, around the world in 72 days (Mumm champagne, accordion, silk waterproof wrap, dark gloves…)

Walking the Jungle

By turns anecdotal and practical, this book tells the tales of the Amazon and most of its dark secrets.

Walking the Jungle

More beautiful than most wild places, the jungle is also more dangerous, and the jungle of the Amazon, John Coningham's home for over thirty years, sports hazards to make all travellers hesitate. Meet tocandira stinging ants, killer Hylesia caterpillars, deadly surucucu vipers, skin-crawling bicho worms, dog-eating giant otters, and many more creatures that await the unwary. By turns anecdotal and practical, the book tells tales of the jungle and most of its dark secrets. Armchair travellers and true Indiana Jones' will benefit equally from Coningham's unique expertise on life in one of the most dangerous natural habitats on earth.

Amazon the River for the First Time

AmazonRiverExpert.com Sustainable Travel https://sustainabletravelinternational.org/documents/op_carboncalcs.html Swimming the Amazon http://www.amazonswim.com/main.php Walking the Amazon http://es. walkingtheamazon. com/ VIDEOS THAT ...

Amazon the River for the First Time

Traveling in the Amazon is a dream of millions of people from around the world, and this eco-book shows you how to accomplish this historic journey and make the trip safely, easier and more affordable than you could ever imagine.Right now, you can conveniently catch a flight from anywhere in the world and spend a couple of days in the Amazon rainforest. On the other hand, you could make a longer journey, as I did, from the beginning of the river in Peru, through Colombia, to its end at the beautiful beaches of Brazil's Atlantic coast. Throughout this journey, you will learn that the Amazon is full of brilliant and magical moments and together we will discover:The secret, step by step, to enjoying the most beautiful river in the world according to time, budget, and favorite activities How to save hundreds of dollars on airline & boat tickets to have a fantastic holidayHow to maximize your time on the river or the jungle. Do more with less!Exotic safe tours off the beaten track to beautiful little-visited, but safe remote communities.Places to go surfing, golfing, play tennis, or go fishingHow you can help conserve the environment and why you should support indigenous communities At least 80% of the proceeds of this book are donated to institutions in the Amazon communityWhether your style of traveling is relaxed or full of activities and adventures, this eco-guide will help you explore the Amazon River the fun and easy way. This eco-book from Mynor Schult will the only tour guide you will need on your incredible journey.

Walking the Forest with Chico Mendes

Struggle for Justice in the Amazon Gomercindo Rodrigues. Walking the forest involves a profound apprenticeship. I discovered this over a period of years, and although I became a great walker, I didn't learn half of what I needed to know ...

Walking the Forest with Chico Mendes

A close associate of Chico Mendes, Gomercindo Rodrigues witnessed the struggle between Brazil's rubber tappers and local ranchers—a struggle that led to the murder of Mendes. Rodrigues's memoir of his years with Mendes has never before been translated into English from the Portuguese. Now, Walking the Forest with Chico Mendes makes this important work available to new audiences, capturing the events and trends that shaped the lives of both men and the fragile system of public security and justice within which they lived and worked. In a rare primary account of the celebrated labor organizer, Rodrigues chronicles Mendes's innovative proposals as the Amazon faced wholesale deforestation. As a labor unionist and an environmentalist, Mendes believed that rain forests could be preserved without ruining the lives of workers, and that destroying forests to make way for cattle pastures threatened humanity in the long run. Walking the Forest with Chico Mendes also brings to light the unexplained and uninvestigated events surrounding Mendes's murder. Although many historians have written about the plantation systems of nineteenth-century Brazil, few eyewitnesses have captured the rich rural history of the twentieth century with such an intricate knowledge of history and folklore as Rodrigues.

Life Lessons From the Amazon

While walking the length of the Amazon River, he was infuriated by the attitude of his walking partner, Cho, when things didn't work out. Apparently, he would often say: "When there is, there is, and when there isn't, there isn't.

Life Lessons From the Amazon

This is the tale of an epic three-month adventure through unexplored jungle terrain – and it might even change your life Fuelled by a zest for life and the desire to explore the world around her, Pip Stewart took on a world-first challenge: following Guyana’s Essequibo River from source to sea. With the help of guides from the Waî Waî indigenous community, Pip and her teammates journeyed through the rainforest, facing peril every day as they kayaked rapids, traversed waterfalls and hacked their way through the mountainous jungle of the Guiana Shield, before finally reaching the Atlantic Ocean. Survival skills and a flesh-eating parasite weren’t the only things Pip took home from the rainforest. From contending with snakes to learning about the value of community, forgiveness and self-belief, in Life Lessons from the Amazon Pip shares many pearls of wisdom that we can all apply to our own lives. Her hard-won insights invite us to embrace the wildness within ourselves and live more every day.

Naked and Marooned

In a flash I saw why I'd needed to walk the Amazon. Hang your hat on that achieve. ment, Ed, and you can forget about growing up and becoming accountable. My expectations of being able to move into my tiny shelter this day were absurd.

Naked and Marooned

‘I stood on the beach truly alone for the first time. I would not see another person for sixty days. I was on an uninhabited tropical island and I had nothing with me to help me survive. No food, no equipment, no knife and not even any clothes. All I had was my camera kit so that I could intimately record my self-inflicted sentence.’ What if you were abandoned on a tropical island with no food or water, no basic equipment, not even a knife, and no clothes – could you survive? Extreme adventurer Ed Stafford isn’t sure, but he’s about to find out as he pushes himself to the limit in this gripping and inspirational test of human survival. For sixty days, with only his explorer’s instinct and a video camera to record his experiences, Ed faces the ultimate feat of physical and mental endurance. He confronts blazing heat and brutal loneliness; eats snails to escape starvation and battles illness, dehydration and fatigue in what is his most dangerous, and at times life-threatening, challenge to date. This epic story of survival, full of exhilarating highs and devastating lows, is told with raw emotion and captivating honesty. This book will leave you amazed and exhausted.

The Amazon Silver Talisman

"Yes, Chief Yontay," answered the skinny man, then he sketched the chief a salute and ran away. Yontay said nothing else and continued walking the grounds, his eyes not watching the splendor nature 30 |The Amazon: Silver Talisman ...

The Amazon  Silver Talisman

Luis Pessoa and Keisy's Hardin's fate was intertwined when they were children. Destined to meet again what challenges awaited them.

The Amazon

After walking the Pucani's serpentine canyon to the foot of the last slopes, he comes to the escarp— ment of a series of insignificant, broken-down hills. Their height of barely sixty meters can be climbed in three short minutes.

The Amazon

In the eight pieces that make up Land Without History, first published in Portuguese in 1909, Euclides da Cunha offers a rare look into twentieth century Amazonia, and the consolidation of South American nation states. Mixing scientific jargon and poetic language, the essays in Land Without History provide breathtaking descriptions of the Amazonian rivers and the ever-changing nature that surrounds them. Brilliantly translated by Ronald Sousa, Land Without History offers a view of the ever changing ecology of the Amazon, and a compelling testimony to the Brazilian colonial enterprise, and its imperialist tendencies with regard to neighboring nation-states.

Mapping the Amazon

Only a brief passage shows César walking the streets to his father's house to sleep toward the end of the narrative. Otherwise, Las tres mitades hides the city's position as an entrepôt of commerce along the Amazon River, although the ...

Mapping the Amazon

An analysis of the political and ecological consequences of charting the Amazon River basin in narrative fiction, Mapping the Amazon examines how widely read novels from twentieth-century South America attempted to map the region for readers. Authors such as José Eustasio Rivera, Rómulo Gallegos, Mario Vargas Llosa, César Calvo, Márcio Souza, and Mário de Andrade travelled to the Amazonian regions of their respective countries and encountered firsthand a forest divided and despoiled by the spatial logic of extractivism. Writing against that logic, they fill their novels with geographic, human, and ecological realities omitted from official accounts of the region. Though the plots unfold after the height of the Amazon rubber boom (1850-1920), the authors construct landscapes marked by that first large-scale exploitation of Amazonian biodiversity. The material practices of rubber extraction resurface in the stories told about the removal of other plants, seeds, and minerals from the forest as well as its conversion into farmland. Smith places the counter-discursive impulses of each novel in dialogue with various modernizing projects that carve Amazonia into cultural and economic spaces: border commissions, extractive infrastructure, school geography manuals, Indigenous education programs, and touristic propaganda. Even the "novel maps" studied, however, have blind spots, and Mapping the Amazon considers the legacy of such unintentional omissions today.

A Narrative of Travels on the Amazon and Rio Negro

With an Account of the Native Tribes, and Observations on the Climate, Geology, and Natural History of the Amazon Valley Alfred Russel Wallace. As I was walking quietly along I saw a large jet - black animal come out of the forest about ...

A Narrative of Travels on the Amazon and Rio Negro


The Struggle for Amazon Town

Other changes have been modest , particularly in comparison to other parts of the Amazon . For example , in Gurupa there has been no rapid urbanization ... 3 The Demise Of The NATIVE AMERICAN remember walking the AN AMAZON COMMUNITY 39.

The Struggle for Amazon Town

Massive changes have engulfed the Brazilian Amazon region in the forty years since Charles Wagley's landmark study, Amazon Town, was first published. In his engaging restudy, Richard Pace explores today's "Amazon Town" (Gurupa), where development efforts have left little untouched, little familiar. Focusing on the actions of the community as it faces new opportunities and recurring adversity, Pace examines the social and cultural history of Gurupa - including such factors as regional underdevelopment, environmental degradation, and social conflict - as well as the more recent effects of political mobilization and liberation theology on human rights awareness and social justice. He richly illustrates the political and economic forces - national and international - that affect Gurupa, and explores the motivations and means of those searching for alternatives to current patterns of development.