War Gothic in Literature and Culture

This interdisciplinary collection explores the rich and long-standing relationship between war and the Gothic.

War Gothic in Literature and Culture

In the context of the current explosion of interest in Gothic literature and popular culture, this interdisciplinary collection of essays explores for the first time the rich and long-standing relationship between war and the Gothic. Critics have described the global Seven Year's War as the "crucible" from which the Gothic genre emerged in the eighteenth century. Since then, the Gothic has been a privileged mode for representing violence and extreme emotions and situations. Covering the period from the American Civil War to the War on Terror, this collection examines how the Gothic has provided writers an indispensable toolbox for narrating, critiquing, and representing real and fictional wars. The book also sheds light on the overlap and complicity between Gothic aesthetics and certain aspects of military experience, including the bodily violation and mental dissolution of combat, the dehumanization of "others," psychic numbing, masculinity in crisis, and the subjective experience of trauma and memory. Engaging with popular forms such as young adult literature, gaming, and comic books, as well as literature, film, and visual art, War Gothic provides an important and timely overview of war-themed Gothic art and narrative by respected experts in the field of Gothic Studies. This book makes important contributions to the fields of Gothic Literature, War Literature, Popular Culture, American Studies, and Film, Television & Media.

War Gothic in Literature and Culture

These texts demonstrate that vampire literature that engages with the historical event of the Civil War is inflected by discourses of war at work in contemporary American culture. Southern (War) Gothic Perhaps nowhere in the United ...

War Gothic in Literature and Culture

In the context of the current explosion of interest in Gothic literature and popular culture, this interdisciplinary collection of essays explores for the first time the rich and long-standing relationship between war and the Gothic. Critics have described the global Seven Year’s War as the "crucible" from which the Gothic genre emerged in the eighteenth century. Since then, the Gothic has been a privileged mode for representing violence and extreme emotions and situations. Covering the period from the American Civil War to the War on Terror, this collection examines how the Gothic has provided writers an indispensable toolbox for narrating, critiquing, and representing real and fictional wars. The book also sheds light on the overlap and complicity between Gothic aesthetics and certain aspects of military experience, including the bodily violation and mental dissolution of combat, the dehumanization of "others," psychic numbing, masculinity in crisis, and the subjective experience of trauma and memory. Engaging with popular forms such as young adult literature, gaming, and comic books, as well as literature, film, and visual art, War Gothic provides an important and timely overview of war-themed Gothic art and narrative by respected experts in the field of Gothic Studies. This book makes important contributions to the fields of Gothic Literature, War Literature, Popular Culture, American Studies, and Film, Television & Media.

Gothic Utterance

Agnieszka Soltysik Monnet and Steffen Hantke, 'Ghosts from the Battlefields: A Short Historical Introduction to the War Gothic', in Monnet and Hantke (eds), War Gothic in Literature and Culture (New York: Routledge, 2016), pp. xi, xx.

Gothic Utterance

The Gothic has always been interested in strange utterances and unsettling voices – from half-heard ghostly murmurings and the admonitions of the dead, to the terrible cries of the monstrous nonhuman. Gothic Utterance is the first book-length study of the role played by such voices in the Gothic tradition, exploring their prominence and importance in the American literature produced between the Revolutionary War and the close of the nineteenth century. The book argues that the American Gothic foregrounds the overpowering affect and distressing significations of the voices of the dead, dying, abjected, marginalised or nonhuman, in order to undertake a sustained interrogation of what it means to be and speak as an American in this period. The American Gothic imagines new forms of relation between speaking subjects, positing more inclusive and expansive kinds of community, while also emphasising the ethical demands attending our encounters with Gothic voices. The Gothic suggests that how we choose to hear and respond to these voices says much about our relationship with the world around us, its inhabitants – dead or otherwise – and the limits of our own subjectivity and empathy.

The Palgrave Handbook of Contemporary Gothic

Anara Karagulov and Nick Megoran, “Discourses of Danger and the War on Terror: Gothic Kyrgyzstan and the Collapse of ... Agnieszka Soltysik Monnet and Steffen Hantke, “Introduction”, in War Gothic in Literature and Culture (Abington, ...

The Palgrave Handbook of Contemporary Gothic

“Simply put, there is absolutely nothing on the market with the range of ambition of this strikingly eclectic collection of essays. Not only is it impossible to imagine a more comprehensive view of the subject, most readers – even specialists in the subject – will find that there are elements of the Gothic genre here of which they were previously unaware.” - Barry Forshaw, Author of British Gothic Cinema and Sex and Film The Palgrave Handbook of Contemporary Gothic is the most comprehensive compendium of analytic essays on the modern Gothic now available, covering the vast and highly significant period from 1918 to 2019. The Gothic sensibility, over 200 years old, embraces its dark past whilst anticipating the future. From demons and monsters to post- apocalyptic fears and ecological fantasies, Gothic is thriving as never before in the arts and in popular culture. This volume is made up of 62 comprehensive chapters with notes and extended bibliographies contributed by scholars from around the world. The chapters are written not only for those engaged in academic research but also to be accessible to students and dedicated followers of the genre. Each chapter is packed with analysis of the Gothic in both theory and practice, as the genre has mutated and spread over the last hundred years. Starting in 1918 with the impact of film on the genre's development, and moving through its many and varied international incarnations, each chapter chronicles the history of the gothic milieu from the movies to gaming platforms and internet memes, television and theatre. The volume also looks at how Gothic intersects with fashion, music and popular culture: a multi-layered, multi-ethnic, even a trans-gendered experience as we move into the twenty first century.

The Cambridge History of the Gothic Volume 3 Gothic in the Twentieth and Twenty First Centuries

Soltysik Monnet, Agnieszka and Steffen Hantke, 'Ghosts from the Battlefield: A Short Historical Introduction to the War Gothic', in Agnieszka Soltysik Monnet and Steffen Hantke (eds), War Gothic in Literature and Culture, ...

The Cambridge History of the Gothic  Volume 3  Gothic in the Twentieth and Twenty First Centuries

The third volume of The Cambridge History of the Gothic is the first book to provide an in-depth history of Gothic literature, film, television and culture in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries (c. 1896-present). Identifying key historical shifts from the birth of film to the threat of apocalypse, leading international scholars offer comprehensive coverage of the ideas, events, movements and contexts that shaped the Gothic as it entered a dynamic period of diversification across all forms of media. Twenty-three chapters plus an extended introduction provide in-depth accounts of topics including Modernism, war, postcolonialism, psychoanalysis, counterculture, feminism, AIDS, neo-liberalism, globalisation, multiculturalism, the war on terror and environmental crisis. Provocative and cutting edge, this will be an essential reference volume for anyone studying modern and contemporary Gothic culture.

Mid century gothic

By reassessing the novels, films, visual culture and technologies of the period, the book argues that gothicism itself was redefined by the upstart objects of modernity.

Mid century gothic

Mid-Century Gothic offers a fresh perspective on the cultural moment that followed World War II, and discovers a deep sense of unease mingling with optimism about the future. By reassessing the novels, films, visual culture and technologies of the period, the book argues that gothicism itself was redefined by the upstart objects of modernity.

The Written Dead

Essays on the Literary Zombie Kyle William Bishop, Angela Tenga ... His work has appeared in War Gothic in Literature and Culture, Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary Popular Fantasy, and Beyond the Frontier: Innovations in First Year ...

The Written Dead

From Victor Halperin's White Zombie (1932) to George A. Romero's landmark Night of the Living Dead (1968) and AMC's hugely successful The Walking Dead (2010-), zombie mythology has become an integral part of popular culture. In a reversal of the typical pattern of adaptation, the zombie developed onscreen before appearing in short stories and comic books during the 20th century, and more recently as subjects of more traditional novels. This collection of new essays examines some of the most influential and inventive zombie literature, from the early stories to the most recent narratives, including some told from a zombie perspective.

The American Imperial Gothic

Revealing the ways in which images of destruction and social upheaval both query the violence with which the US has asserted itself locally and globally, and feed the longing for stable imperial structures, this book will be of interest to ...

The American Imperial Gothic

The imagination of the early twenty-first century is catastrophic, with Hollywood blockbusters, novels, computer games, popular music, art and even political speeches all depicting a world consumed by vampires, zombies, meteors, aliens from outer space, disease, crazed terrorists and mad scientists. These frequently gothic descriptions of the apocalypse not only commodify fear itself; they articulate and even help produce imperialism. Building on, and often retelling, the British ’imperial gothic’ of the late nineteenth century, the American imperial gothic is obsessed with race, gender, degeneration and invasion, with the destruction of society, the collapse of modernity and the disintegration of capitalism. Drawing on a rich array of texts from a long history of the gothic, this book contends that the doom faced by the world in popular culture is related to the current global instability, renegotiation of worldwide power and the American bid for hegemony that goes back to the beginning of the Republic and which have given shape to the first decade of the millennium. From the frontier gothic of Charles Brockden Brown's Edgar Huntly to the apocalyptic torture porn of Eli Roth's Hostel, the American imperial gothic dramatises the desires and anxieties of empire. Revealing the ways in which images of destruction and social upheaval both query the violence with which the US has asserted itself locally and globally, and feed the longing for stable imperial structures, this book will be of interest to scholars and students of popular culture, cultural and media studies, literary and visual studies and sociology.

The Bloomsbury Handbook to Cold War Literary Cultures

Kodat, C. (2014), Don't Act, Just Dance: The Metapolitics of Cold War Culture, Rutgers, NJ: Rutgers University Press. Nichols, K. (2014), “The Cold War Gothic Poetry of Sylvia Plath,” in C. Crow (ed.), A Companion to American Gothic, ...

The Bloomsbury Handbook to Cold War Literary Cultures

Adopting a unique historical approach to its subject and with a particular focus on the institutions involved in the creation, dissemination, and reception of literature, this handbook surveys the way in which the Cold War shaped literature and literary production, and how literature affected the course of the Cold War. To do so, in addition to more 'traditional' sources it uses institutions like MFA programs, university literature departments, book-review sections of newspapers, publishing houses, non-governmental cultural agencies, libraries, and literary magazines as a way to understand works of the period differently. Broad in both their geographical range and the range of writers they cover, the book's essays examine works of mainstream American literary fiction from writers such as Roth, Updike and Faulkner, as well as moving beyond the U.S. and the U.K. to detail how writers and readers from countries including, but not limited to, Taiwan, Japan, Uganda, South Africa, India, Cuba, the USSR, and the Czech Republic engaged with and contributed to Anglo-American literary texts and institutions.

Transnational Gothic

Chapter 10 Transnational War Gothic from the American Civil War to World War I Agnieszka Soltysik Monnet It has been customary to ... As a result, most important scholars working on Gothic literature and culture today consistently use a ...

Transnational Gothic

Offering a variety of critical approaches to late eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Gothic literature, this collection provides a transnational view of the emergence and flowering of the Gothic. The essays expand on now well-known approaches to the Gothic (such as those that concentrate exclusively on race, gender, or nation) by focusing on international issues: religious traditions, social reform, economic and financial pitfalls, manifest destiny and expansion, changing concepts of nationhood, and destabilizing moments of empire-building. By examining a wide array of Gothic texts, including novels, drama, and poetry, the contributors present the Gothic not as a peripheral, marginal genre, but as a central mode of literary exchange in an ever-expanding global context. Thus the traditional conventions of the Gothic, such as those associated with Ann Radcliffe and Monk Lewis, are read alongside unexpected Gothic formulations and lesser-known Gothic authors and texts. These include Mary Rowlandson and Bram Stoker, Frances and Anthony Trollope, Louisa May Alcott, Elizabeth Gaskell, Theodore Dreiser, Rudyard Kipling, and Lafcadio Hearn, as well as the actors Edmund Kean and George Frederick Cooke. Individually and collectively, the essays provide a much-needed perspective that eschews national borders in order to explore the central role that global (and particularly transatlantic) exchange played in the development of the Gothic. British, American, Continental, Caribbean, and Asian Gothic are represented in this collection, which seeks to deepen our understanding of the Gothic as not merely a national but a global aesthetic.

Combat Death in Contemporary American Culture

Agnieszka Soltysik Monnet is professor of American literature and culture at the University of Lausanne in Switzerland. Her publications include The Poetics and Politics of the American Gothic (2010), War Gothic (co-editor, 2016), ...

Combat Death in Contemporary American Culture

Combat Death in Contemporary American Culture: Popular Cultural Conceptions of War since World War II explores how war has been portrayed in the United States since World War II, with a particular focus on an emotionally charged but rarely scrutinized topic: combat death. Agnieszka Soltysik Monnet argues that most stories about war use three main building blocks: melodrama, adventure, and horror. Monnet examines how melodrama and adventure have helped make war seem acceptable to the American public by portraying combat death as a meaningful sacrifice and by making military killing look necessary and often even pleasurable. Horror no longer serves its traditional purpose of making the bloody realities of war repulsive, but has instead been repurposed in recent years to intensify the positivity of melodrama and adventure. Thus this book offers a fascinating diagnosis of how war stories perform ideological and emotional work and why they have such a powerful grip on the American imagination.

Historical Dictionary of Gothic Literature

It is notable, too, that the pioneer journal in the field, Gothic Studies (1993—), has inspired its publishers—the International ... Literature and the Classical Past,” in A Companion to Med— ieval English Literature and Culture, c.

Historical Dictionary of Gothic Literature

The Historical Dictionary of Gothic Literature covers its history through a chronology, an introductory essay, and an extensive bibliography. The dictionary section has over 200 cross-referenced entries on the core texts, central authors, and the recurrent conventions that have distinguished writing in the genre for 250 years. This book is an ideal access point for students, researchers, or anyone interested in the history of Gothic Literature.

Literary Culture and U S Imperialism From the Revolution to World War II

From the Revolution to World War II John Carlos Rowe Professor of English University of California at Irvine. but also knows that traditional literary criticism, with its emphasis on formal and technical questions, is often part of the ...

Literary Culture and U S Imperialism   From the Revolution to World War II

John Carlos Rowe, considered one of the most eminent and progressive critics of American literature, has in recent years become instrumental in shaping the path of American studies. His latest book examines literary responses to U.S. imperialism from the late eighteenth century to the 1940s. Interpreting texts by Charles Brockden Brown, Poe, Melville, John Rollin Ridge, Twain, Henry Adams, Stephen Crane, W. E. B Du Bois, John Neihardt, Nick Black Elk, and Zora Neale Hurston, Rowe argues that U.S. literature has a long tradition of responding critically or contributing to our imperialist ventures. Following in the critical footsteps of Richard Slotkin and Edward Said, Literary Culture and U.S. Imperialism is particularly innovative in taking account of the public and cultural response to imperialism. In this sense it could not be more relevant to what is happening in the scholarship, and should be vital reading for scholars and students of American literature and culture.

Timelines of American Literature

David Blight, “The Civil War Isn't Over,” Atlantic, Apr. 8, 2015, www . theatlantic . com / politics / archive / 2015 ... Undead Souths: The Gothic and Beyond in Southern Literature and Culture (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University ...

Timelines of American Literature

What is our definition of "modernismif we imagine it stretching from 1865 to 1965 instead of 1890 to 1945? How does the captivity narrative change when we consider it as a contemporary, not just a "colonial,genre? What does the course of American literature look like set against the backdrop of federal denials of Native sovereignty or housing policies that exacerbated segregation? Filled with challenges to scholars, inspirations for teachers (anchored by an appendix of syllabi), and entry points for students, Timelines of American Literature gathers some of the most exciting new work in the field to showcase the revelatory potential of fresh thinking about how we organize the literary past.

Heroes and Heroism in British Fiction Since 1800

She was previously at the Centre of Excellence “Cultural Foundations of Integration” (University of Konstanz), ... Her research looks at writing, art and film of the Second World War period in the context of a gothic literary tradition, ...

Heroes and Heroism in British Fiction Since 1800

This book is about the manifestations and explorations of the heroic in narrative literature since around 1800. It traces the most important stages of this representation but also includes strands that have been marginalised or silenced in a dominant masculine and higher-class framework - the studies include explorations of female versions of the heroic, and they consider working-class and ethnic perspectives. The chapters in this volume each focus on a prominent conjuncture of texts, histories and approaches to the heroic. Taken together, they present an overview of the ‘literary heroic’ in fiction since the late eighteenth century.

Richard Marsh popular fiction and literary culture 1890 1915

Her research and teaching interests lie primarily in the cultural history of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, with an emphasis on representations of Empire, war and catastrophe. Her forthcoming monograph Gothic Invasions: ...

Richard Marsh  popular fiction and literary culture  1890   1915

Richard Marsh was one of the most popular and prolific authors of the late-Victorian and Edwardian periods. His bestselling The Beetle: A Mystery (1897) outsold Bram Stoker’s Dracula. A prolific author within a range of genres including Gothic, crime, humour and romance, Marsh produced stories about shape-shifting monsters, morally dubious heroes, lip-reading female detectives and objects that come to life. However, while Marsh’s work appealed to a public greedy for sensationalist fiction, both the cultural elite of the day and twentieth-century literary critics looked askance at his popular middlebrow fiction. In the wake of the recent rediscovery of Marsh’s fiction, this essay collection builds on burgeoning scholarly interest in the author. Marsh emerges here as a fascinating writer who helped shape the genres of popular fiction and whose stories offer surprising responses to issues of criminality, gender and empire in this period of cultural transition.

The Enemy in Contemporary Film

His research interests and publications span Australasian cinema (especially Oz Gothic), genre films, auteur studies ... 2015), Re-Imagining the First World War: New Perspectives in Anglophone Literature and Culture, The Great War: From ...

The Enemy in Contemporary Film

Culture and conflict inevitably go hand in hand. The very idea of culture is marked by the notion of difference and by the creative, fraught interaction between conflicting concepts and values. The same can be said of all key ideas in the study of culture, such as identity and diversity, memory and trauma, the translation of cultures and globalization, dislocation and emplacement, mediation and exclusion. This series publishes theoretically informed original scholarship from the fields of literary and cultural studies as well as media, visual, and film studies. It fosters an interdisciplinary dialogue on the multiple ways in which conflict supports and constrains the production of meaning, on how conflict is represented, how it relates to the past and projects the present, and how it frames scholarship within the humanities. Editors: Isabel Capeloa Gil, Catholic University of Portugal, Lisbon, Portugal; Paulo de Medeiros, University of Warwick, UK, Catherine Nesci, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA. Editorial Board: Arjun Appadurai, New York University, Claudia Benthien, Universität Hamburg, Elisabeth Bronfen, Universität Zürich, Bishnupriya Ghosh, University of California, Santa Barbara, Joyce Goggin, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Lawrence Grossberg, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Andreas Huyssen, Columbia University, Ansgar Nünning, Universität Gießen, Naomi Segal, University of London, Birkbeck College, Márcio Seligmann-Silva, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, António Sousa Ribeiro, Universidade de Coimbra, Roberto Vecchi, Universita di Bologna, Samuel Weber, Northwestern University, Liliane Weissberg, University of Pennsylvania, Christoph Wulf, FU Berlin, Longxi Zhang, City University of Hong Kong

The Lord of the Rings

Friedman, B. (1982), 'Tolkien and David Jones: The Great War and the War of the Ring'. ... Robbins R. and J. Wolfreys (eds) (2000), Victorian Gothic: Literary and Cultural Manifestations in the Nineteenth Century. Basingstoke: Palgrave.

The Lord of the Rings

- Critical essays reflecting a variety of schools of criticism - Notes on the contributing critics, a chronology of the author's life, and an index - An introductory essay by Harold Bloom.

A Companion to American Gothic

... and literary culture, however, the Suburban Gothic is also surely the Gothic mode that reveals most about the pressures, terrors, and anxiety of American middle-class life from the end of World War II up until the present day.

A Companion to American Gothic

A Companion to American Gothic features a collection of original essays that explore America’s gothic literary tradition. The largest collection of essays in the field of American Gothic Contributions from a wide variety of scholars from around the world The most complete coverage of theory, major authors, popular culture and non-print media available