Wealth s and Subjective Well Being

This volume examines the impact of wealth on quality of life and subjective well-being (SWB).

Wealth s  and Subjective Well Being

This volume examines the impact of wealth on quality of life and subjective well-being (SWB). As wealth is related to economic, environmental and social features of societies, this volume serves as an important resource in understanding economic and SWB. It further discusses a variety of experiences and consequences of inequalities of wealth. Through the availability of wealth data in recent international surveys, this volume explores the multiple relations between wealth and SWB. Structured around four main pillars the book presents analysis of the topic at various levels such as theoretical and conceptual, methodological and empirically, ending with a section on distribution and policies.

The Psychological Wealth of Nations

Subjective well-being: The science of happiness, and a proposal for a national index. ... Happiness: Unlocking the mystery of psychological wealth. ... Diener, E., Emmons, R. A., Larsen, R. L., & Griffin, S. (1985).

The Psychological Wealth of Nations

The Psychological Wealth of Nations reviews the range of new scientific research related to individual and societal happiness. Presents a comprehensive review of happiness, from conceptual and measurement issues to an exploration of predictors and consequences of happiness Explores the psychology and economics of happiness and examines the correlations between societal wealth, productivity, and happiness in different countries Offers compelling insights into the ways individual happiness impacts the psychological wealth of overall society Features a highly interdisciplinary approach, with considerations of philosophy, sociology, economics, political sciences, as well as psychology

The Routledge Handbook of Taxation and Philanthropy

The Report of the High-Level Meeting on Wellbeing and Happiness: Defining a New Economic Paradigm. ... Is philanthropy a way for the wealthy to convert wealth into happiness? ... Wealth(S) and Subjective Well-Being ...

The Routledge Handbook of Taxation and Philanthropy

The Routledge Handbook of Taxation and Philanthropy ventures into a territory that is still widely unexplored. It contains 30 academic contributions that aim to provide a better understanding of whether, why, and how philanthropic initiatives, understood as voluntary contributions for the common good, can and should be fostered by states through tax incentives. The topic has been addressed from a multidisciplinary and multicultural perspective – covering neuroeconomics, sociology, political science, psychology, affective sciences, philosophy, behavioral economy, and law – because of its global and multifaceted nature. It also contains the OECD report on Taxation and Philanthropy released in November 2020, which was prepared in this context as a result of a collaboration with the Geneva Centre for Philanthropy of the University of Geneva. The book is divided into four sections, exploring, respectively, the justification of tax incentives for philanthropy, theoretical and empirical insights about taxes, efficiency and donor behavior in that context, and tax incentives for cross-border philanthropy and for hybrid entities and social entrepreneurship. It is believed that this volume will be a landmark yet only the beginning of a journey in which a lot remains to be studied, learned, and said.

National Wealth

Graham, C. and Pettinato, S. (2002), 'Frustrated Achievers: Winners, Losers, and Subjective Well Being in New Market Economies', in Happiness and Hardship: Opportunity and Insecurity in New Market Economies (Washington, DC; ...

National Wealth

To understand economics, it is crucial to define wealth, and understand how it is created, destroyed, stored and managed. This edited volume assembles high-quality contributions defining key concepts and addressing economic and policy issues around national wealth.

The Balanced Development Index for Europe s OECD Countries 1999 2017

Princeton University Press, Princeton/Oxford Brulé G, Suter Ch (2019) Wealth(s) and subjective well-being. Springer, Cham Buchanan JM, Tullock G (1962) The calculus of consent, vol 3. University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor Buscha F ...

The Balanced Development Index for Europe   s OECD Countries  1999   2017

This book presents the Balanced Development Index (BDI), measuring socioeconomic development in twenty-two European OECD member countries in a period 1999-2017. Compared to other composite measures of development, BDI looks beyond traditional development indicators, such as GDP, to create an index which gives equal weight to social, economic, objective, and subjective aspects of development. The BDI aggregates forty-two detailed indicators into four composite middle-level indexes: external economic (characterizing functioning of national economies in their international surroundings), internal economic (characterizing various aspects of domestic economic conditions), social expectations (public hopes and fears concerning economic, political and social conditions), and current social condition (including both objective and subjective social indicators)—which are, in turn, aggregated into the general BDI index.

Mental Well Being

Journal of Happiness Studies: An Interdisciplinary Periodical on Subjective Well-Being, 1 , 41–78. Diener, E., & Oishi, S. (2000). Money and happiness: Income and subjective well-being across nations. In E. Diener & E. M. Suh (Eds.), ...

Mental Well Being

This book provides a new generation of research in which scholars are investigating mental health and human development as not merely the absence of illness or dysfunction, but also the presence of subjective well-being. Subjective well-being is a fundamental facet of the quality of life. The quality of an individual’s life can be assessed externally and objectively or internally and subjectively. From an objective standpoint, other people measure and judge another’s life according to criteria such as wealth or income, educational attainment, occupational prestige, and health status or longevity. Nations, communities, or individuals who are wealthier, have more education, and live longer are considered to have higher quality of life or personal well-being. The subjective standpoint emerged during the 1950s as an important alternative to the objective approach to measuring individual’s well-being. Subjectively, individuals evaluate their own lives as evaluations made, in theory, after reviewing, summing, and weighing the substance of their lives in social context. Research has clearly shown that measures of subjective well-being, which are conceptualized as indicators of mental health (or ‘mental well-being’), are factorially distinct from but correlated with measures of symptoms of common mental disorders such as depression. Despite countless proclamations that health is not merely the absence of illness, there had been little or no empirical research to verify this assumption. Research now supports the hypothesis that health is not merely the absence of illness, it is also the presence of higher levels of subjective well-being. In turn, there is growing recognition of the personal and social utility of subjective well-being, both higher levels of hedonic and eudaimonic wellbeing. Increased subjective well-being has been linked with higher personal and social ‘goods’: higher business profits, more worker productivity, greater employee retention; increased protection against mortality; increased protection against the onset and increase of physical disability with aging; improved cognitive and immune system functioning; and increased levels of social capital such as civic responsibility, generativity, community involvement and volunteering. This edited volume brings together for the first time the growing scientific literature on positive mental health that is now being conducted in many countries other than the USA and provides students and scholars with an invaluable source for teaching and for generating new ideas for furthering this important line of research.

Happiness Technology and Innovation

His main themes of interest are subjective well-being, sustainability, innovation, and metrics. He has coedited the books Metrics of Subjective WellBeing: Limits and Improvement (Springer, together with Filomena Maggino) and Wealth(s) ...

Happiness  Technology and Innovation

This book asks what kind of impacts innovations and technology have on subjective well-being and happiness. It presents the state of the art both in terms of results and theoretical questioning on these topics. It proposes a new concept: innovation that leads to greater happiness, and highlights new research in this area. In so doing, it addresses a less researched area in the field of well-being research. The authors state that notwithstanding the indisputable positive contributions of innovation and technology, there are also drawbacks, which need equal attention in research. This book is of interest to students and researchers of quality of life and well-being, as well as innovation research.

Economic Analysis of Happiness and Satisfaction

This thesis considers selected prevailing issues and puzzles in the micro-economic analysis of happiness and satisfaction.

Economic Analysis of Happiness and Satisfaction

This thesis considers selected prevailing issues and puzzles in the micro-economic analysis of happiness and satisfaction. The first part of the thesis considers issues of measurement, metrics, and method, with particular focus on the issue of cardinality. The second part of the thesis addresses two apparent puzzles identified in the literature, concerning subjective wellbeing across the lifecycle and across education levels. Panel data from the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey are used in all empirical analyses.Chapters 2 and 3 of the thesis evaluate the case for cardinal interpersonal and intrapersonal comparison of life satisfaction scores. The assumption of cardinality is desirable because it allows for more powerful statistical tools of analysis to be used, the benefits of which are well established. A second possible implication is that estimated subjective wellbeing model parameters may be interpreted directly as measuring marginal utilities, which is not otherwise possible. However, no consensus exists for whether or not this assumption is justified. Chapter 2 presents a review of this debate, concluding that cardinality is intuitively reasonable, and that even if cardinality cannot be assured or rejected with certainty we both can and should use available alternative information about wellbeing to learn more about the informational content of commonly used subjective wellbeing scales. Subsequently, chapter 3 presents an empirical analysis which applies the principle of simultaneous conjoint measurement to compare life satisfaction scores with available data on mental health. The resulting evidence provides strong support for both of ordinal and cardinal comparison of life satisfactions scores, both across and within individuals.Chapter 4 considers the specification, estimation and interpretation of subjective wellbeing models using panel data. A key aspect of this chapter is the evaluation of the shape and curvature of the relationship between subjective wellbeing and income, as well as wealth. The results favour the implied log-normal specification, where subjective wellbeing is linearly associated with position in the distribution of income and wealth. Contrary to the more common lin-log specification this specification is not sensitive to the inclusion or omission of low values; fitted values match the data well across the entire income and wealth distributions; and it allows for a weakly S-shaped utility or wellbeing function, which is consistent with recent discoveries in behavioural studies and also observed in the data. Further, a general analysis of panel models demonstrates that standard linear pooled regression models yield estimates which tend to be robust, consistent and efficient compared to alternative models and methods of estimation. Chapter 5 examines the extent to which associations between economic circumstances and financial satisfaction are age-dependent. This analysis is motivated by the commonly observed, though contested, U-shape in subjective wellbeing across the lifecycle. This chapter therefore provides a brief examination of the relationship between age and life satisfaction using HILDA data, which supports a robust U-shape. Subsequently, the core analysis demonstrates that half of the observed age effect is explained by changes in financial satisfaction. Further, associations between income and wealth and financial satisfaction, and between financial satisfaction and life satisfaction, are strongest in midlife and abate thereafter. Consequently, changes in material concerns represent a key explanation for why we might observe a U-shape in happiness across the lifecycle.Chapter 6 examines the association between education and subjective wellbeing. The evidence on this relationship is scarce, inconsistent and poorly understood, and reports of a negative association, which appear counter-intuitive, are common. The analysis presented here explores two possible explanations for this puzzle: over-allocation of time toward work, and higher expectations and aspirations. Evidence presented here supports the latter explanation, but not the former. People with higher levels of education exhibit higher working hours, but also higher optimal working hours. However, wellbeing benefits of higher education from improved circumstances are neutralised by rightward drifts in the life satisfaction function: People with higher levels of education require better circumstances in order to reach a given level of life satisfaction, and as these higher expectations tend to be met, the overall effect of education on life satisfaction is neutral.In sum, the thesis makes original contributions both in the areas of measurement and method and in the form of a greater understanding of what drives known (and less known) patterns previously identified in the subjective wellbeing literature.

Subjective Well Being and Life Satisfaction

Subjective well-being: The science of happiness and a proposal for a national index. American Psychologist, 55 (1), 34–43. ... Happiness: Unlocking the mysteries of psychological wealth. ... Diener, E., Oishi, S., & Lucas, R. E. (2003).

Subjective Well Being and Life Satisfaction

The quality of people’s relationships with and interactions with other people are major influences on their feelings of well-being and their evaluations of life satisfaction. The goal of this volume is to offer scholarly summaries of theory and research on topics at the frontier of the study of these social psychological influences—both interpersonal and intrapersonal—on subjective well-being and life satisfaction. The chapters cover a variety of types of relationships (e.g., romantic relationships, friendships, online relationships) as well as a variety of types of interactions with others (e.g., forgiveness, gratitude, helping behavior, self-presentation). Also included are chapters on broader social issues such as materialism, sexual identity and orientation, aging, spirituality, and meaning in life. Subjective Well-Being and Life Satisfaction provides a rich and focused resource for graduate students, upper-level undergraduate students, and researchers in positive psychology and social psychology, as well as social neuroscientists, mental health researchers, clinical and counselling psychologists, and anyone interested in the science of well-being.

Social Belongingness and Well Being International Perspectives

57, 119–169. doi: 10.1023/A:1014411319119 Diener, E., and Oishi, S. (2000). “Money and happiness: income and subjective wellbeing across nations,” in Culture and Subjective Well-Being, eds E. Diener and E. M. Suh (Cambridge, ...

Social Belongingness and Well Being  International Perspectives


The Cambridge Handbook of Psychology and Economic Behaviour

New Findings and Future Directions for Subjective Well-Being Research. ... Wealth and Happiness Across the World: Material Prosperity Predicts Life Evaluation, Whereas Psychosocial Prosperity ... Diener, E., and Oishi, S. (2000). Money ...

The Cambridge Handbook of Psychology and Economic Behaviour

There has recently been an escalated interest in the interface between psychology and economics. The Cambridge Handbook of Psychology and Economic Behaviour is a valuable reference dedicated to improving our understanding of the economic mind and economic behaviour. Employing empirical methods - including laboratory and field experiments, observations, questionnaires and interviews - the Handbook provides comprehensive coverage of theory and method, financial and consumer behaviour, the environment and biological perspectives. This second edition also includes new chapters on topics such as neuroeconomics, unemployment, debt, behavioural public finance, and cutting-edge work on fuzzy trace theory and robots, cyborgs and consumption. With distinguished contributors from a variety of countries and theoretical backgrounds, the Handbook is an important step forward in the improvement of communications between the disciplines of psychology and economics that will appeal to academic researchers and graduates in economic psychology and behavioral economics.

The New Psychology of Money

Happy people live longer: Subjective well-being contributes to health and longevity. Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being, 3, 1–43. Diener, E. & Oishi, S. (2000). Money and happiness. In E. Diener & E. Suhs (Eds.), ...

The New Psychology of Money

The New Psychology of Money is an accessible and engrossing analysis of our psychological relationship to money in all its forms. Comprehensive and insightful, Adrian Furnham explores the role that money plays in a range of contexts, from the family to the high street, and asks whether the relationship is always a healthy one. Discussing how money influences what we think, what we say, and how we behave in a range of situations, the book places the dynamics of high finance and credit card culture in context with traditional attitudes towards wealth across a range of cultures, as well as how the concept of money has developed historically. The book is split into four sections: Understanding Money. What are our attitudes to money, and how does nationality, history and religion mediate those attitudes? Money in the Home How do we grow up with money, and what role does it play within the family? What role does gender play, and can we lose control in dealing with money? Money at Work. Are we really motivated by money at work? And what methods do retailers use to persuade us to part with our money? Money in Everyday Life. How do we balance the need to create more money for ourselves through investments with the desire to make charitable contributions, or give money to friends and family? How has the e-revolution changed our relationship to money? Radically updated from its original publication in 1998, The New Psychology of Money is a timely and fascinating book on the psychological impact of an aspect of daily life we generally take for granted. It will be of interest to all students of psychology, economics and business and management, but also anyone who takes an interest in the world around them.

Culture and Well Being

Situating psychological well-being: Exploring the cultural roots of its theory and research. Journal of Counseling and ... Will money increase subjective well-being? ... Diener, E., Emmons, R. A., Larsen, R.J., & Griffin, S. (1985).

Culture and Well Being

material boundaries capture cultural effects? The articles contained in this volume offer initial answers to most of these questions. The culture and well-being questions are of fundamental importance to understanding in the entire eld and to scienti c knowledge in the behavioral s- ences as a whole. Unless we understand what is universal and what is speci c, we cannot hope to understand the processes governing well-being. Unfortunately, our scienti c knowledge in most behavioral science elds, including the study of we- being, has been built on a narrow database drawn from westernized, industrialized nations. This means that we have only a little knowledge of whether our ndings are generalizable to all peoples of the globe and to universal human psychol- ical processes. Fortunately, during the last decade my students and I, as well as others working in this area, have rapidly expanded our knowledge of well-being vis-a-vis ` culture. The rst attempt to summarize the ndings in this area came in 1999 with Culture and Subjective Well-Being, a book edited by Eunkook Suh and Diener. The current volume represents a renewed effort to give a broad overview of major ndings in this area and to point to the important directions for future research. Composition of This Volume I am very pleased with the articles presented in this volume because I believe that they represent true advances in our fundamental understanding of subjective we- being.

The Day the World Stops Shopping

Wealth, Happiness and Happiness Inequality in China.” In Wealth(s) and Subjective Well-being, edited by Gaël Brule and Christian Suter, 445–61. Springer, 2019. CHAPTER 10: We may need to see the ruins to know it's time to build ...

The Day the World Stops Shopping

We can't stop shopping but we must stop shopping - the consumer dilemma that defines our lives and our future. What would happen if we did? We are using up the planet at almost double the rate it can regenerate. To support our economies, we're told we must shop now like we've never shopped before. And whilst we can do it more responsibly, the scale of our consumption remains the biggest factor in the ruination of the planet. Yet our reliance on stuff continues to grow. But what would our world look like if we stopped? Would civilisation collapse? Would the planet's ecology be reborn? What would happen to the way we think, make products, use time, express our individuality? Would life be better - or worse? Visiting places where economies have experienced temporary shut-downs, artisan producers, zero-consumption societies and bringing together a host of expert views, this is both a deeply reported thought-experiment, a history of our relationship with consumption, and a story about the future. Our private choices are putting the world in peril. The Day the World Stops Shopping is an essential exploration of who we are and what we use, and a vision of a more sustainable world.

The Psychology of Quality of Life

Hedonic Well-Being, Life Satisfaction, and Eudaimonia M. Joseph Sirgy. Boes, S., & Winkelmann ... Personal income and subjective well-being: A review. Journal of Happiness Studies, 1(2), ... Will money increase subjective well-being?

The Psychology of Quality of Life

The second edition will be an update and further elaboration of the literature related to subjective well-being, happiness, and life satisfaction. It will have a new substantial section that focuses on reviewing much of the literature of subjective well-being within specific life domains (social life, material life, leisure life, work life, community life, spiritual life, family life, health life, sex life, travel life, etc.) In the 1st edition the research in these various life domains was discussed only briefly. The second edition will maintain the same organizational structure of the first edition; that is, Part 1 will focus on introduction (definitions and distinctions; examples of measures of subjective well-being, happiness, and life satisfaction; and motives underlying subjective well-being). Part 2 will focus on psychological strategies that are allow people to optimize subjective well-being by engaging in psychological processes related to the relationship between and among life domains (e.g., social life, family life, love life, spiritual life, community life, financial life, etc.) This part will contain four chapters related to these various “inter-domain” processes: bottom-up spillover, top-down spillover, horizontal spillover, and compensation. Part 3 of the book will focus on “intra-domain” psychological strategies designed to optimize subjective well-being. These include re-evaluation based on personal history, re-evaluation based on self-concept, re-evaluation based on social comparison, goal selection, goal implementation and attainment, and re-appraisal. Part 4 of the book will focus on balance processes—how people attempt to create balance in their lives using psychological processes within specific life domains (intra-domain strategies) and processes that relate one domain to another (inter-domain strategies).

Well Being in Latin America

Estimating equivalence scales in Mexico: A subjective well-being approach. Oxford Development Studies, 35(3), 273–293. ... In G. Brulé & C. Suter (Eds.), Wealth(s) and subjective well-being (pp. 147–165). Berlin: Springer.

Well Being in Latin America

This book provides an overview of factors fostering well-being in Latin America and discusses many threats to well-being in the region. The book assesses the current well-being situation in Latin American countries and offers an explanation based on its many drivers, such as family arrangements, kindness and affection of interpersonal relations, economic situation, education regimes, political institutions, poverty, income inequality, crime and violence, and the weakness of political institutions. The book provides a framework to fully understand the drivers behind high well-being, including the challenges and opportunities that public policy faces in the procurement of people’s well-being. The book provides relevant material for policymakers and social scientist interested in the procurement of well-being.

Health Systems Health Wealth And Societal Well Being Assessing The Case For Investing In Health Systems

Knowles, S. and Owen, P. (1995) Health capital in cross-country variation in income per capita in the Mankiw–Romer–Weil model. Economic Letters, 48: 99–106. ... Lindeboom, M. and Kerkhofs, M. (2006) Subjective Health Measures, ...

Health Systems  Health  Wealth And Societal Well Being  Assessing The Case For Investing In Health Systems

This book argues that health systems are not, as is often believed, simply a drag on resources, but rather part and parcel of improving health and achieving better economic growth.

Positive Psychology

Will money increase subjective well-being? Social Indicators Research, 57(2), 119–169. Diener, E., & Oishi, S. (2000). Money and happiness: Income and subjective well-being across nations. In E. Diener & E. M. Suh (Eds.), ...

Positive Psychology

This volume is a comprehensive review of theoretical and empirical contributions to positive psychology. It provides a scientific understanding of how human strengths help people psychologically and physically, showing how stressful circumstances do not inexorably lead to negative prognoses. It examines how individuals confront challenges, appreciate others, and regard daily experiences as meaningful. Many of the chapters also challenge the negative, disease-model approach that dominates much of the research concerning health and well-being. Chapters also address applications and future directions for the field. The broad scope makes it a key resource for undergraduates, graduates, researchers, and practitioners in social, clinical, and positive psychology.

Quality of Life

Cummins, R., Gullone, E. and Lau, A. (2002) A model of subjective well-being homeostasis: the role of personality, ... Diener, E. and Oishi, S. (2000) Money and happiness: income and subjective well-being across nations, in Diener, ...

Quality of Life

Quality of life is one of the most important issues facing the world today and is central to the development of social policy. This innovative book discusses this crucial topic, assessing the criteria for judging attempts to raise quality of life, including the satisfaction of basic and social needs, autonomy to enjoy life and social connectivity. It considers key topics such as: individual well-being and health-related quality of life human needs - living fulfilling and flourishing lives poverty and social exclusion social solidarity, altruism and trust within communities. Quality of Life is the first systematic presentation of this subject from both individual and collective perspectives. It provides a powerful overview of a concept which is becoming increasingly prominent in the social sciences and is essential reading for students of social policy, sociology and health studies.

Measuring Understanding and Improving Wellbeing Among Older People

The effects of wealth and income on Subjective Well-Being and ill-being. Economic Record, 80, S24–S33. Hicks, S., Tinkler, L., & Allin, P. (2013). Measuring Subjective Well-Being and its potential role in policy: Perspectives from the ...

Measuring  Understanding and Improving Wellbeing Among Older People

How can we be happier, healthier and more satisfied in life? This edited collection examines various dimensions of wellbeing among older people, including its measurement; social, environmental and economic determinants; and how research can be translated into policy to improve quality of life for older people. With an increasingly ageing population across countries and an increasing population of older adults, there is growing interest in improving older people’s ability to live healthily and happily. With a focus on retirement and aged care, this book is important reading for those interested in Welfare Economics, Health Economics and Development.