Young Children S Health And Well Being

well-being. in. context. The true wealth of a nation can be measured by the health
of its youngest citizens, and in the twenty-first century children's health is still
largely determined by social, environmental and economic factors (UNICEF
2001c; ...

Young Children S Health And Well Being

Looks at the social, environmental, and economic influences at work today in determining the health and well-being of the world's children.

Well Being

The distinguished contributors to this volume combine a rigorous analysis of human sensations, emotions, and moods with a broad assessment of the many factors, from heredity to nationality, that bear on our well-being.

Well Being

The nature of well-being is one of the most enduring and elusive subjects of human inquiry. Well-Being draws upon the latest scientific research to transform our understanding of this ancient question. With contributions from leading authorities in psychology, social psychology, and neuroscience, this volume presents the definitive account of current scientific efforts to understand human pleasure and pain, contentment and despair. The distinguished contributors to this volume combine a rigorous analysis of human sensations, emotions, and moods with a broad assessment of the many factors, from heredity to nationality, that bear on our well-being. Using the tools of experimental science, the contributors confront the puzzles of human likes and dislikes. Why do we grow accustomed and desensitized to changes in our lives, both good and bad? Does our happiness reflect the circumstances of our lives or is it determined by our temperament and personality? Why do humans acquire tastes for sensations that are initially painful or unpleasant? By examining the roots of our everyday likes and dislikes, the book also sheds light on some of the more extreme examples of attraction and aversion, such as addiction and depression. Among its wide ranging inquiries, Well-Being examines systematic differences in moods and behaviors between genders, explaining why women suffer higher rates of depression and anxiety than men, but are also more inclined to express positive emotions. The book also makes international comparisons, finding that some countries' populations report higher levels of happiness than others. The contributors deploy an array of methods, from the surveys and questionnaires of social science to psychological and physiological experiments, to develop a comprehensive new approach to the study of well-being. They show how the sensory pleasures of the body can tells us something about the higher pleasures of the mind and even how the effectiveness of our immune system can depend upon the health of our social relationships.

The Science of Well Being

Richard E. Lucas and Ed Diener Abstract Personality has been found to be more
strongly associated with subjective well-being in many instances than are life
circumstances. In part, this might be due to the fact that temperament and other ...

The Science of Well Being

Major Theoretical Questions Theories about subjective well-being have grown over the past several decades, but have been re ned only slowly as adequate data have been compiled to test them. We can characterize the theories describing happiness along several dimensions. The rst dimension is whether the theory places the locus of happiness in external conditions such as income and status, as many sociological theories do, or within the attitudes and temperament of the individual, as many psychological theories do. Some have maintained that people adapt to all circumstances over time, so that only individual personality matters for producing happiness, whereas others believe that economicandothersocietalfactorsarethedominantforcesinproducingwell-being. Throughout my writings there is a mix of both the internal and external factors that in uence well-being. A second dimension that characterizes scholarship on well-being is the issue of whether the factors affecting well-being are relative or absolute. That is, are there standards used by people at all times and places in judging their lives and in reacting to events? Or are standards dependent on what other people possess, on expec- tions,andonadaptationlevelsbasedonpastcircumstances?Again,thereisevidence supporting the role of both universal and relative standards. People around the globe are probably in uenced by common factors such as friendship versus loneliness, but even these universal in uences on happiness are probably subject to some degree of comparison depending on what the person is used to and what others have. However, some factors might be much more comparative than other in uences, as Hsee, Yang, Li, and Shen (in press) have described.

Putting Health Into Place

This book represents a collective commitment to exploring links between social and cultural theory, ideas about place, and discourses on health that will be of interest to readers across the social and health sciences.

Putting Health Into Place

As the first word of the book's title suggests, this is an active volume, one that contributes to situating health in the simultaneously tangible, negotiated, and experienced realities of place. Robin A. Kearns and Wilbert M. Gesler argue that medical issues are a necessary but insufficient focus in developing geographies of health and healing. This contention is supported by the authors of the thirteen substantive chapters who convey research findings from the Americas, Britain, and the Pacific. This book represents a collective commitment to exploring links between social and cultural theory, ideas about place, and discourses on health that will be of interest to readers across the social and health sciences.

International Migration

The book will inform and educate social science students, policy-makers and those wrestling on a practical level with the implications of migration.

International Migration

With events in Africa and the Arab world causing migration on a huge scale, migration has become a widely discussed and debated issue, pushing it to the top of the political agenda. Globalization, climate change, and demographic developments in the West provide a backdrop to the current discourses and policies on migration. There is a conflict between humanitarian impulses and protectionism. Recent decades have seen an increase in research and writing, in the UK and internationally, on the different aspects of migration. The increase in numbers and diversity of migrants is recognised as posing significant challenges and opportunities for social and public policies. Simultaneously the policy landscape on migrants' entitlements to public services, as well as notions of social protection, are in a state of flux in the context of the adoption of 'austerity policies' across the European Union and beyond. These trends have significant implications on access to services, including health and social care services. Author Philomena de Lima provides a contemporary understanding of migrants and migration processes and trends. She reviews the conceptual and theoretical discourses on 'integration' and citizenship rights with a particular focus on issues related to migrants' access to services, including health and social care services. This book aims to inform and educate social science students, policy-makers, and those wrestling on a practical level with the implications of migration. (Series: Policy & Practice in Health and Social Care, Vol. 21) [Subject: Social Welfare, Migration Studies, Public Policy]

Fetal Well Being

Chapter 3 ASSESSMENT OF FETAL WELL-BEING DURING THE SECOND
HALF OF PREGNANCY 3.1. FETAL MOVEMENTS The development of fetal
motor behavior in early pregnancy reflects the development of the fetal nervous
system ...

Fetal Well Being

This exciting volume provides an in-depth look at all of the aspects of fetal well-being. It bases each chapter on a critical evaluation of medical literature and on the authors' clinical experience regarding the subject. Easy to read and understand, this book presents discussions on the anatomical structure and respiratory function of the placenta and their effects on the fetus. The 67 figures illustrate theoretical concepts and clinical applications, and the conveniently placed tables allow speedy access to precise data throughout the text. This publication gives special consideration to the developments in ultrasound and direct access to the fetus. Every person involved with obstetrics, gynecology, reproductive medicine, pediatrics, and ultrasound will consider this monograph a must.

Assessing Well Being

Ed Diener, Christie Napa Scollon, and Richard E. Lucas Abstract Subjective well-
being, or what is popularly often called “happiness,” has been of intense interest
throughout human history. We review research showing that it is not a single ...

Assessing Well Being

The Sandvik, Diener, and Seidlitz (1993) paper is another that has received widespread attention because it documented the fact that self-report well-being scales correlate with a number of other methods of measuring the same concepts, such as with reports by knowledgeable “informants” (family and friends), expe- ence sampling measurement, and the memory for good versus bad life events. A single factor was found to underlie measures using different methods, and a n- ber of different well-being self-report measures were found to correlate with the non-self-report measures. Thus, although the self-report measures of well-being are imperfect, and can be in uenced by response artifacts, they have substantial validity as shown by their correlations with measurements based on alternative methods. Whereas the Pavot and Diener article reviewed the Satisfaction with Life Scale, the Lucas, Diener, and Larsen (2003) paper reviews various approaches to assessing positive emotions. As we wrote in the chapter in this volume in which we present new measures, we do not consider any of the existing measures of positive affect to be entirely acceptable for measuring subjective well-being in the affect area, and that is why we have created and validated a new measure.

Well Being

This volume derived from original presentations given at a conference in Atlanta, Georgia, under the auspices of the Center for Child Well-Being.

Well Being

This volume derived from original presentations given at a conference in Atlanta, Georgia, under the auspices of the Center for Child Well-Being. Scholars, practitioners, public health professionals, and principals in the child development community convened to address a science-based framework for elements of well-being and how the elements might be developed across the life course. Integrating physical, cognitive, and social-emotional domains, Well-Being is the first scientific book to consider well-being holistically. Focusing on a set of core strengths grouped within these three domains, the book also includes a fourth section on developmental strengths through adulthood that broadly examines a continuum of health and development, as well as transitions in well-being. This volume takes a developmental perspective across the life course, describing foundational strengths for well-being--the capacities that can be actively developed, supported, or learned. These foundational strengths--problem solving, emotional regulation, and physical safety--are the positive underpinnings of early child health and development, as well as ongoing well-being across the life course. Working together and blending their respective disciplinary perspectives and expertise, 53 experts in psychology, sociology, child development, and medicine have contributed to the book.

Human Well Being and Economic Goals

that greater consumption increases well-being), international supremacisni (the
purpose of the economy is maintaining the state's international position), and
economic liberalism ("good" is whatever people think it is, and the function of the
 ...

Human Well Being and Economic Goals

What are the ends of economic activity? According to neoclassical theory, efficient interaction of the profit-maximizing "ideal producer" and the utility-maximizing "ideal consumer" will eventually lead to some sort of social optimum. But is that social optimum the same as human well-being? Human Well-Being and Economic Goals addresses that issue, considering such questions as: Does the maximization of individual welfare really lead to social welfare? How can we deal with questions of relative welfare and of equity? How do we define, or at least understand, individual and social welfare? And how can these things be measured, or even assessed? Human Well-Being and Economic Goals brings together more than 75 concise summaries of the most significant literature in the field that consider issues of present and future individual and social welfare, national development, consumption, and equity. Like its predecessors in the Frontier Issues in Economic Thought series, it takes a multidisciplinary approach to economic concerns, examining their sociological, philosophical, and psychological aspects and implications as well as their economic underpinnings. Human Well-Being and Economic Goals provides a powerful introduction to the current and historical writings that examine the concept of human well-being in ways that can help us to set goals for economic activity and judge its success. It is a valuable summary and overview for students, economists, and social scientists concerned with these issues.

The Science of Subjective Well Being

The scientific study of subjective well-being generally focuses on two key com-
ponents related to well-being: (1) the balance of negative versus positive moods
experienced by individuals on a day-to-day basis, and (2) the amount of global ...

The Science of Subjective Well Being

This authoritative volume reviews the breadth of current scientific knowledge on subjective well-being (SWB): its definition, causes and consequences, measurement, and practical applications that may help people become happier. Leading experts explore the connections between SWB and a range of intrapersonal and interpersonal phenomena, including personality, health, relationship satisfaction, wealth, cognitive processes, emotion regulation, religion, family life, school and work experiences, and culture. Interventions and practices that enhance SWB are examined, with attention to both their benefits and limitations. The concluding chapter from Ed Diener dispels common myths in the field and presents a thoughtful agenda for future research.