Well Read Black Girl

'Essential reading for the twenty-first-century reader. This book is smart, powerful, and complete.' - Min Jin Lee, author of Pachinko

Well Read Black Girl

'Required reading.' - Cosmopolitan 'This should be read as a sacred text. Here, you will bear witness to a perpetual salvation song.' - Jason Reynolds Remember that moment when you first encountered a character who seemed to be written just for you? That feeling of belonging remains with readers the rest of their lives - but not everyone regularly sees themselves reflected on the pages of a book. In this timely anthology, Glory Edim, founder of the online community, Well-Read Black Girl, brings together original essays by some of America's best black women writers to shine a light on how important it is that we all - regardless of gender, race, religion, or ability - have the opportunity to find ourselves in literature. Whether it's learning about the complexities of femalehood from Zora Neale Hurston and Toni Morrison, finding a new type of love in The Color Purple, or using mythology to craft an alternative black future, each essay reminds us why we turn to books in times of both struggle and relaxation. As she has done with her book club-turned-online community, Edim has created a space where black women's writing, knowledge and life experiences are lifted up, to be shared with all readers who value the power of a story to help us understand the world, and ourselves. Contributors include: Jesmyn Ward, Lynn Nottage, Jacqueline Woodson, Gabourey Sidibe, Morgan Jerkins, Tayari Jones, Rebecca Walker, and Barbara Smith. 'Essential reading for the twenty-first-century reader. This book is smart, powerful, and complete.' - Min Jin Lee, author of Pachinko

On Girlhood 15 Stories from the Well Read Black Girl Library

These inspiring tales of world builders and rule breakers conclude with Zora Neale Hurston’s “How It Feels to Be Colored Me,” a personal essay brimming with wit and strength: “When covered by the waters, I am; and the ebb but ...

On Girlhood  15 Stories from the Well Read Black Girl Library

Proudly introducing the Well-Read Black Girl Library Series, On Girlhood is a lovingly curated anthology celebrating short fiction from such luminaries as Rita Dove, Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, and more. “When you look over your own library, who do you see?” Since founding the beloved Well-Read Black Girl book club in 2015, Glory Edim has emerged as a literary tastemaker for a new generation. Continuing her life’s work to brighten and enrich American reading lives through the work of legendary Black authors, she now launches her Well-Read Black Girl Library Series with On Girlhood. This meticulously selected anthology features a wide range of unique voices, finally illuminating a distinctly robust sector of contemporary literature: groundbreaking short stories that explore the thin yet imperative line between Black girlhood and womanhood. Divided into four themes—Innocence, Belonging, Love, and Self-Discovery—the unforgettable young protagonists within contend with the trials of coming of age that shape who they are and what they will become. With this tradition in mind, Innocence opens with Jamaica Kincaid’s searing “Girl,” in which a mother offers fierce instructions to her impressionable daughter. This deceptively simple yet profound monologue is followed by Toni Morrison’s first and only published short story, the now-canonical “Recitatif,” about two neglected girls who come together in youth only to find themselves on opposite picket lines in adulthood. In Belonging, Toni Cade Bambara’s “The Lesson” follows rambunctious students on a field trip where they are exposed to a new world of luxury. In Love, Dana Johnson’s “Melvin in the Sixth Grade” captures the yearning of a lovesick teen smitten with the only boy who looks her way. And in Self-Discovery, Edwidge Danticat’s “Seeing Things Simply” charts the creative awakening of Princesse, a young woman with a hunger to be fully seen. These inspiring tales of world builders and rule breakers conclude with Zora Neale Hurston’s “How It Feels to Be Colored Me,” a personal essay brimming with wit and strength: “When covered by the waters, I am; and the ebb but reveals me again.” At times heartbreaking and at times hilarious, these stories boldly push past flat stereotypes and powerfully convey the beauty of Black girlhood. In bringing together an array of influential authors—past and present—whose work remains timeless, Glory Edim has created an indispensable compendium for every home library and a soul-stirring guide to coming of age. Featuring stories by Jamaica Kincaid, Toni Morrison, Dorothy West, Rita Dove, Camille Acker, Toni Cade Bambara, Amina Gautier, Alexia Arthurs, Dana Johnson, Alice Walker, Gwendolyn Brooks, Edwidge Danticat, Shay Youngblood, Paule Marshall, and Zora Neale Hurston.

Well Read Black Girl

GLoRY EDIM is the founder of Well-Read Black Girl, a Brooklynbased book club and online community that celebrates the uniqueness of Black literature and sisterhood. In fall 2017, she organized the first-ever Well-Read Black Girl ...

Well Read Black Girl

NOMINATED FOR AN NAACP IMAGE AWARD • An inspiring collection of essays by black women writers, curated by the founder of the popular book club Well-Read Black Girl, on the importance of recognizing ourselves in literature. “Yes, Well-Read Black Girl is as good as it sounds. . . . [Glory Edim] gathers an all-star cast of contributors—among them Lynn Nottage, Jesmyn Ward, and Gabourey Sidibe.”—O: The Oprah Magazine Remember that moment when you first encountered a character who seemed to be written just for you? That feeling of belonging remains with readers the rest of their lives—but not everyone regularly sees themselves in the pages of a book. In this timely anthology, Glory Edim brings together original essays by some of our best black women writers to shine a light on how important it is that we all—regardless of gender, race, religion, or ability—have the opportunity to find ourselves in literature. Contributors include Jesmyn Ward (Sing, Unburied, Sing), Lynn Nottage (Sweat), Jacqueline Woodson (Another Brooklyn), Gabourey Sidibe (This Is Just My Face), Morgan Jerkins (This Will Be My Undoing), Tayari Jones (An American Marriage), Rebecca Walker (Black, White and Jewish), and Barbara Smith (Home Girls: A Black Feminist Anthology) Whether it’s learning about the complexities of femalehood from Zora Neale Hurston and Toni Morrison, finding a new type of love in The Color Purple, or using mythology to craft an alternative black future, the subjects of each essay remind us why we turn to books in times of both struggle and relaxation. As she has done with her book club–turned–online community Well-Read Black Girl, in this anthology Glory Edim has created a space in which black women’s writing and knowledge and life experiences are lifted up, to be shared with all readers who value the power of a story to help us understand the world and ourselves. Praise for Well-Read Black Girl “Each essay can be read as a dispatch from the vast and wonderfully complex location that is black girlhood and womanhood. . . . They present literary encounters that may at times seem private and ordinary—hours spent in the children’s section of a public library or in a college classroom—but are no less monumental in their impact.”—The Washington Post “A wonderful collection of essays.”—Essence

Bibliophile Diverse Spines

Ballantine Books 2018 hardcover, design by Sharanya Durvasula, art by Alexandra Bowman GLORY EDIM Founder and CEO of Well-Read Black Girl Instagram: @wellreadblackgirl Well-Read Black Girl was founded by Glory Edim in 2015.

Bibliophile  Diverse Spines

It's time to diversify your reading list. This richly illustrated and vastly inclusive collection uplifts the works of authors who are often underrepresented in the literary world. Using their keen knowledge and deep love for all things literary, coauthors Jamise Harper (founder of the Diverse Spines book community) and Jane Mount (author of Bibliophile) collaborated to create an essential volume filled with treasures for every reader: • Dozens of themed illustrated book stacks—like Classics, Contemporary Fiction, Mysteries, Cookbooks, and more—all with an emphasis on authors of color and own voices • A look inside beloved bookstores owned by Black, Indigenous, and People of Color • Reading recommendations from leading BIPOC literary influencers Diversify your reading list to expand your world and shift your perspective. Kickstart your next literary adventure now! EASY TO GIFT: This portable guide is packed with more than 150 colorful illustrations is a perfect gift for any booklover. The textured paper cover, gold foil, and ribbon marker make this book a special gift or self-purchase. DISCOVER UNSUNG LITERARY HEROES: The authors dive deep into a wide variety of genres, such as Contemporary Fiction, Classics, Young Adult, Sci-Fi, and more to bring the works of authors of color to the fore. ENDLESS READING INSPIRATION: Themed book stacks and reading suggestions from luminaries of the literary world provide curated book recommendations. Your to-read list will thank you. Perfect for: bookish people; literary lovers; book club members; Mother's Day shoppers; stocking stuffers; followers of #DiverseSpines; Jane Mount and Ideal Bookshelf fans; Reese's Book Club and Oprah's Book Club followers; people who use Goodreads.com; readers wanting to expand/decolonize their book collections; people interested in uplifting BIPOC voices; antiracist activists and educators; grads and students; librarians and library patrons wanting to expand/decolonize their book collections; people interested in uplifting BIPOC voices; antiracist activists and educators; grads and students; librarians and library patrons

Teaching Beautiful Brilliant Black Girls

Additional findings are also needed from studies on Black girls who are experiencing text disengagement and school disconnect due to environmental trauma stemming from being mishandled and misunderstood. Edim's Well-Read Black Girl: ...

Teaching Beautiful Brilliant Black Girls

Be a part of the radical transformation to honor and respect Beautiful Brilliant Black Girls! This book is a collective call to action for educational justice and fairness for all Black Girls – Beautiful, Brilliant. This edited volume focuses on transforming how Black Girls are understood, respected, and taught. Editors and authors intentionally present the harrowing experiences Black Girls endure and provide readers with an understanding of Black Girls’ beauty, talents, and brilliance. This book calls willing and knowledgeable educators to disrupt and transform their learning spaces by presenting: Detailed chapters rooted in scholarship, lived experiences, and practice Activities, recommendations, shorter personal narratives, and poetry honoring Black Girls Resources centering Black female protagonists Companion videos illustrating first-hand experiences of Black Girls and women Tools in authentically connecting with Black Girls so they can do more than survive – they can thrive.

Well Read Black Girl

A 15+ Week all inclusive Self-Care Planner, Habit Tracker and Weekly Journal is perfect for getting your daily to-do's in order, keep track of your nutrition and water intake, spending and savings, space for extra notes and so much more!

Well Read Black Girl

A 15+ Week all inclusive Self-Care Planner, Habit Tracker and Weekly Journal is perfect for getting your daily to-do's in order, keep track of your nutrition and water intake, spending and savings, space for extra notes and so much more! More than 200 pages (thats over 6 months) filled with prompts for leading your best lifestyle and quality of living.

Black Women Black Love

as life,” and it's “Black women's gift to the world,” writes womanist scholar Layli Maparyan. ... https://blackgirlsrun.com/; Black Girls Rock, https://blackgirlsrock.com/; and Well-Read Black Girl, www.wellreadblackgirl.com/.

Black Women  Black Love

In this analysis of social history, examine the complex lineage of America's oppression of Black companionship. According to the 2010 US census, more than seventy percent of Black women in America are unmarried. Black Women, Black Love reveals how four centuries of laws, policies, and customs have created that crisis. Dianne Stewart begins in the colonial era, when slave owners denied Blacks the right to marry, divided families, and, in many cases, raped enslaved women and girls. Later, during Reconstruction and the ensuing decades, violence split up couples again as millions embarked on the Great Migration north, where the welfare system mandated that women remain single in order to receive government support. And no institution has forbidden Black love as effectively as the prison-industrial complex, which removes Black men en masse from the pool of marriageable partners. Prodigiously researched and deeply felt, Black Women, Black Love reveals how white supremacy has systematically broken the heart of Black America, and it proposes strategies for dismantling the structural forces that have plagued Black love and marriage for centuries.

A Black Woman Did That

Reading became so much a part of her daily practice that her longtime boyfriend surprised her with a gift: a custom T-shirt printed with a list of her favorite authors and the nickname: “Well-Read Black Girl.

A Black Woman Did That

A Black Woman Did That! spotlights vibrant, inspiring black women whose accomplishments have changed the world for the better. A Black Woman Did That! is a celebration of strong, resilient, innovative, and inspiring women of color. Through vibrant illustrations and engaging storytelling, author Malaika Adero spotlights well-known historical figures including Ida B. Wells, Madam CJ Walker, Mae Jemison, and Shirley Chisholm, as well as contemporary stars including Kamala Harris, Stacey Abrams, Jesmyn Ward, Ava DuVernay, and Amy Sherald. Readers will recognize some names in the book, but will also be introduced to many important Black women who have changed history or who are reshaping the cultural landscape. They’ll learn: *how Barbara Harris became the first female bishop of the Episcopal Church *how Misty Copeland became the first Black principal dancer of the American Ballet Theater *how the work and inventions of Dr. Patricia Bath have saved or restored the eyesight of people around the world *how Shirley Chisolm changed the face of politics in America *how Glory Edim has turned her passion for reading into a thriving online community *and much more! .

Black and White

... Black Girls Lift, Black Women who want more DC, Black Travelers Network, Black Unicorns, Black Nonbelievers of DC, Black Girl Clique, Mahogany Travelers, Black Technologists, Black Women of a Certain age, Well-Read Black Girls of ...

Black and White

Criminal profiler Pat Brown and her business owner son, Dave Brown, are horrified at what is happening to the legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. After being refused permission to join Meetup groups in her area because she was not a person of color, Pat, a white woman with a biracial son, created a fake Meetup group. It was called “White Women Yoga” in order to test the new concept that racial segregation is now alright in America and the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is no longer in operation. All hell broke loose; liberals were indignant that a white person would dare have a whites-only group and called her racist, a Nazi, a white supremacist, while at the same time praising black-only groups for having “safe spaces.” Pat and Dave are mother and son, white and black, and they are dismayed at how our country is going backward in race relations. They believe the Democratic Party and the push for socialism is making this happen. Pat has spent almost twenty years in the media, giving crime commentary on almost every cable news channel on a regular basis, while Dave has always been fascinated with our political and economic systems. When the war against conservatives came into full swing during the Trump administration, when black and white conservatives were being painted as racists and white supremacists, mother and son came together to fight back. This book is about their journey as people of two different races, and how the great progress made in race relations and black lives is being torn apart by the Left. Conservatives must continue to fight for our country if we are to keep America great and free for people of all races.

Write On Sisters

I want to share three stories of women who pursued different publishing journeys, all with a tremendous amount of work and discipline, and all to great effect. I'm inspired by Glory Edim, whose online moniker is Well-Read Black Girl.

Write On  Sisters

There are more outlets than ever for writers to spread their messages and share their work, more opportunities to speak out and be seen. Writers expose themselves freely and willingly in a way that would have been unfathomable fifty years ago, and more people than ever are writing and publishing. Men and women are writing with equal fervor and commitment to their message and craft. As a result, it’s easy to assume, or hope, that the gendered playing field is a thing of the past, too. Unfortunately for women writers, it’s not. Knowing what we’re up against and how to fight back is the heart and soul of Write On, Sisters! Inside these pages, Brooke Warner draws upon research, anecdotes, and her personal experiences from twenty years in the book publishing industry to show how women’s writing is discounted or less valued than men’s writing, then provides support to overcome these challenges. This book also shines light on how women writers face not only ever-present historical and social challenges but also their own self-limiting beliefs. Write On, Sisters! is for every woman writer ready to be done with all that, and who’s ready for the next revolution.

This Book Is Feminist

When I joined Glory Edim, creator of the Well-Read Black Girl book club, anthology, and festival, and black feminist scholars Alexis Pauline Gumbs, Christen Smith, and Bianca Williams for a conversation about “Agency + Care: The Power ...

This Book Is Feminist

The follow-up to the New York Times Bestseller This Book is Anti-Racist. 150,000 copies have been sold in the USA.

Black Ink

Literary Legends on the Peril, Power, and Pleasure of Reading and Writing Stephanie Stokes Oliver ... —Glory Edim, founder, Well-Read Black Girl ALSO BY STEPHANIE STOKES OLIVER Daily Cornbread 365 Secrets for ...

Black Ink

Spanning over 250 years of history, Black Ink traces black literature in America from Frederick Douglass to Ta-Nehisi Coates in this “breathtaking anthology celebrating the power of the written word to forge change” (O, The Oprah Magazine). Throughout American history black people are the only group of people to have been forbidden by law to learn to read. This expansive collection seeks to shed light on that injustice, putting some of America’s most cherished voices in a conversation in one magnificent volume that presents reading as an act of resistance. Organized into three sections—the Peril, the Power, and the Pleasure—and featuring a vast array of contributors both classic and contemporary, Black Ink presents the brilliant diversity of black thought in America while solidifying the importance of these writers within the greater context of the American literary tradition. “This electric and electrifying collection of voices serves to open a much-needed window onto the freedom struggle of black literature. It’s a marvel, and a genuine gift for readers everywhere” (Wil Haygood, author of The Butler: A Witness to History). Contributors include: Frederick Douglass, Solomon Northup, Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. Du Bois, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, James Baldwin, Malcolm X, Maya Angelou, Martin Luther King, Jr., Toni Morrison, Walter Dean Myers, Stokely Carmichael [Kwame Ture], Alice Walker, Jamaica Kincaid, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Terry McMillan, Junot Diaz, Edwidge Danticat, Colson Whitehead, Marlon James, Roxane Gay, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, and Colson Whitehead. The anthology features a bonus in-depth interview with President Barack Obama.

Seven Days in June

As a girl, she'd been all angles, sharp lines, a wiry spark plug of unpredictability. A little scary. A lot breathtaking. ... She slid into the seat across from him, plopping down a tote bag that read WELL-READ BLACK GIRL.

Seven Days in June

A REESE WITHERSPOON BOOK CLUB PICK! “Tia Williams’ book is a smart, sexy testament to Black joy, to the well of strength from which women draw, and to tragic romances that mature into second chances. I absolutely loved it.”— Jodi Picoult, #1 NYT bestselling author of The Book of Two Ways and Small Great Things Seven days to fall in love, fifteen years to forget, and seven days to get it all back again... Eva Mercy is a single mom and bestselling erotica writer who is feeling pressed from all sides. Shane Hall is a reclusive, enigmatic, award‑winning novelist, who, to everyone's surprise, shows up in New York. When Shane and Eva meet unexpectedly at a literary event, sparks fly, raising not only their buried traumas, but the eyebrows of the Black literati. What no one knows is that fifteen years earlier, teenage Eva and Shane spent one crazy, torrid week madly in love. While they may be pretending not to know each other, they can't deny their chemistry—or the fact that they've been secretly writing to each other in their books through the years. Over the next seven days, amidst a steamy Brooklyn summer, Eva and Shane reconnect—but Eva's wary of the man who broke her heart, and wants him out of the city so her life can return to normal. Before Shane disappears though, she needs a few questions answered... With its keen observations of creative life in America today, as well as the joys and complications of being a mother and a daughter, Seven Days in June is a hilarious, romantic, and sexy‑as‑hell story of two writers discovering their second chance at love.

The Skin I m in

Social media isn't going anywhere. So we're fortunate—extremely fortunate—that The Skin I'm In is also here to stay. Before incredible movements and monikers like Black Girls Rock, Black Girl Magic, and Well-Read Black Girl, ...

The Skin I m in

Maleeka suffers every day from the taunts of the other kids in her class. If they're not getting at her about her homemade clothes or her good grades, it's about her dark, black skin. When a new teacher, whose face is blotched with a startling white patch, starts at their school, Maleeka can see there is bound to be trouble for her too. But the new teacher's attitude surprises Maleeka. Miss Saunders loves the skin she's in. Can Maleeka learn to do the same?

Black Sunday

Well-Read Black Girl “A poignant debut.” —Bustle “There are some novels that stay with you, imparting a lasting message and leaving an intangible impact. Black Sunday, a debut novel from author Tola Rotimi Abraham, is one of them .

Black Sunday

Named a Kirkus Reviews Best Fiction Book of the Year and called "simultaneously unique and universal,” this fiercely original debut novel follows the fate of four siblings over the course of two decades in Nigeria as they search for agency, love, and meaning in a society rife with hypocrisy (NPR). “I like the idea of a god who knows what it’s like to be a twin. To have no memory of ever being alone.” Twin sisters Bibike and Ariyike are enjoying a relatively comfortable life in Lagos in 1996. Then their mother loses her job due to political strife, and the family, facing poverty, becomes drawn into the New Church, an institution led by a charismatic pastor who is not shy about worshipping earthly wealth. Soon Bibike and Ariyike’s father wagers the family home on a “sure bet” that evaporates like smoke. As their parents’ marriage collapses in the aftermath of this gamble, the twin sisters and their two younger siblings, Andrew and Peter, are thrust into the reluctant care of their traditional Yoruba grandmother. Inseparable while they had their parents to care for them, the twins’ paths diverge once the household shatters. Each girl is left to locate, guard, and hone her own fragile source of power. Written with astonishing intimacy and wry attention to the fickleness of fate, Tola Rotimi Abraham’s Black Sunday takes us into the chaotic heart of family life, tracing a line from the euphoria of kinship to the devastation of estrangement. In the process, it joyfully tells a tale of grace and connection in the midst of daily oppression and the constant incursions of an unremitting patriarchy. This is a novel about two young women slowly finding, over twenty years, in a place rife with hypocrisy but also endless life and love, their own distinct methods of resistance and paths to independence.

The World According to Fannie Davis

As Glory Edim, founder of Well-Read Black Girl Book Club, put it: “I like to ask myself in certain situations, 'What would Fannie do?'” I was so bereft when I lost my mom, mostly because I felt no one outside my family could ever begin ...

The World According to Fannie Davis

As seen on the Today Show: This true story of an unforgettable mother, her devoted daughter, and their life in the Detroit numbers of the 1960s and 1970s highlights "the outstanding humanity of black America" (James McBride). In 1958, the very same year that an unknown songwriter named Berry Gordy borrowed $800 to found Motown Records, a pretty young mother from Nashville, Tennessee, borrowed $100 from her brother to run a numbers racket out of her home. That woman was Fannie Davis, Bridgett M. Davis's mother. Part bookie, part banker, mother, wife, and granddaughter of slaves, Fannie ran her numbers business for thirty-four years, doing what it took to survive in a legitimate business that just happened to be illegal. She created a loving, joyful home, sent her children to the best schools, bought them the best clothes, mothered them to the highest standard, and when the tragedy of urban life struck, soldiered on with her stated belief: "Dying is easy. Living takes guts." A daughter's moving homage to an extraordinary parent, The World According to Fannie Davis is also the suspenseful, unforgettable story about the lengths to which a mother will go to "make a way out of no way" and provide a prosperous life for her family -- and how those sacrifices resonate over time.

Men Love Power Drama Queens

Drama Queens weaves a spellbinding tale of secrets and betrayal, ambition and courage, love and loss.This is a story that will keep you riveted to the pages of its drama-filled plot and the lives of the ladies who are chasing it.

Men  Love   Power   Drama Queens

Men, Love & Power is an emotional, action-packed drama. It’s a story of deception, heartbreak, love, lust and betrayal. and the drama and mayhem are just getting started in this family soap opera. Four african american female cousins from a small town must face their respective secrets, for the revealing of them will change their lives forever. In Drama Queens Book 1, Selah looks like she has it all - the house, the job, the husband but —boom—her life explodes and suddenly she is battling the effects of a dark shame that makes her close out the ones she loves the most. While the men in their family are burning things to the ground, Selah, Moria, Gennifer and Vashti are doing everything they can to hold it all together. But things are constantly thrown into turmoil when old wounds resurface. Moria’s whole life has been about playing it safe. Being the good girl, not coloring outside the lines. Now she is living the life she’s never allowed herself to dream of - especially since the tragic death of her parents. In the midst of these dramas, Selah and Moria are forced to examine their lives and their image and identity. Will an unexpected secret implode their already broken world and takes them down in flames or will they rise like a phoenix from the ashes to reclaim the power they have always desired? Drama Queens weaves a spellbinding tale of secrets and betrayal, ambition and courage, love and loss.This is a story that will keep you riveted to the pages of its drama-filled plot and the lives of the ladies who are chasing it.

Stamped from the Beginning

West Indian Immigrants: A Black Success Story? Muhammad, Khalil Gibran. ... Forman, James, Jr. Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America. Robinson, Cedric J. Black Marxism: ... Well-Read Black Girl: Finding Our Stories, ...

Stamped from the Beginning

The National Book Award winning history of how racist ideas were created, spread, and deeply rooted in American society. Some Americans insist that we're living in a post-racial society. But racist thought is not just alive and well in America -- it is more sophisticated and more insidious than ever. And as award-winning historian Ibram X. Kendi argues, racist ideas have a long and lingering history, one in which nearly every great American thinker is complicit. In this deeply researched and fast-moving narrative, Kendi chronicles the entire story of anti-black racist ideas and their staggering power over the course of American history. He uses the life stories of five major American intellectuals to drive this history: Puritan minister Cotton Mather, Thomas Jefferson, abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison, W.E.B. Du Bois, and legendary activist Angela Davis. As Kendi shows, racist ideas did not arise from ignorance or hatred. They were created to justify and rationalize deeply entrenched discriminatory policies and the nation's racial inequities. In shedding light on this history, Stamped from the Beginning offers us the tools we need to expose racist thinking. In the process, he gives us reason to hope.

The Call Me Ishmael Phone Book

8680 E G Well-Read Black Girl by Glory Edim .......................... 4019 Through Gates of Splendor by Elisabeth Elliot ......... 4932 A Life Without Consequences by Stephen Elliott ...... 7335 American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis .

The Call Me Ishmael Phone Book

For fans of My Ideal Bookshelf and Bibliophile, The Call Me Ishmael Phone Book is the perfect gift for book lovers everywhere: a quirky and entertaining interactive guide to reading, featuring voicemails, literary Easter eggs, checklists, and more, from the creators of the popular multimedia project. The Call Me Ishmael Phone Book is an interactive illustrated homage to the beautiful ways in which books bring meaning to our lives and how our lives bring meaning to books. Carefully crafted in the style of a retro telephone directory, this guide offers you a variety of unique ways to connect with readers, writers, bookshops, and life-changing stories. In it, you’ll discover... -Heartfelt, anonymous voicemail messages and transcripts from real-life readers sharing unforgettable stories about their most beloved books. You’ll hear how a mother and daughter formed a bond over their love for Erin Morgenstern’s The Night Circus, or how a reader finally felt represented after reading Gene Luen Yang’s American Born Chinese, or how two friends performed Mary Oliver’s Thirst to a grove of trees, or how Anne Frank inspired a young writer to continue journaling. -Hidden references inside fictional literary adverts like Ahab’s Whale Tours and Miss Ophelia’s Psychic Readings, and real-life literary landmarks like Maya Angelou City Park and the Edgar Allan Poe House & Museum. -Lists of bookstores across the USA, state by state, plus interviews with the book lovers who run them. -Various invitations to become a part of this book by calling and leaving a bookish voicemail of your own. -And more! Quirky, nostalgic, and full of heart, The Call Me Ishmael Phone Book is a love letter to the stories that change us, connect us, and make us human.

Dream Big

COMFORTABLE TALKING TO PEOPLE YOU уѕэнон Glory Edim is the founder of a book club turned worldwide movement called Well - Read Black Girl ( WRBG ) . It all started in 2015 when Glory decided to be loud and proud about her passion by ...

Dream Big

From Astronaut Abby, the dynamic founder of The Mars Generation, comes a book about dreaming big, reaching for the stars, and making a plan for success! From the age of four, Abigail Harrison knew she wanted to go to space. At age eleven, she sat down and wrote out a plan--not just for how to become an astronaut, but how to be the first astronaut to set foot on Mars. With a degree in biology, internships at NASA, and a national organization founded to help kids reach for the stars themselves, Astronaut Abby is well on her way to achieving her dreams--and she wants to help others do the same! In this book, readers will find helpful advice and practical tips that can help set them on the path toward finding, reaching for, and achieving their goals. With examples from Abby's own life, interactive activities to get readers going, and plenty of fun illustrations along the way, this is the perfect guide for anyone--of any age--with big dreams and plenty of determination. It's time to reach for the stars! Praise for Dream Big!: "With friendly encouragement . . . the content and approach are general enough to appeal both to STEM-oriented fans of the author as well as those whose interests lie in other areas . . . Fun and helpful." --Kirkus Reviews "Any young person who wants to achieve their dreams will find this comprehensive book helpful." --Booklist "The conversational style is easy to understand. . . . There are eye-catching fonts, icons, think bubbles, and callouts. . . . A recommended purchase for middle school and high school libraries. Counselors assisting high schoolers with college preparation and educators teaching leadership classes will find many of the journaling activities very useful." --School Library Journal