What Does It Mean to Be Well Educated?

And More Essays on Standards, Grading, and Other Follies

What Does It Mean to Be Well Educated?

Few writers ask us to question our fundamental assumptions about education as provocatively as Alfie Kohn. Time magazine has called him'perhaps the country's most outspoken critic of education's fixation on grades [and] test scores.' And the Washington Post says he is 'the most energetic and charismatic figure standing in the way of a major federal effort to make standardized curriculums and tests a fact of life in every U.S. school.' In this new collection of essays, Kohn takes on some of the most important and controversial topics in education of the last few years. His central focus is on the real goals of education-a topic, he argues, that we systematically ignore while lavishing attention on misguided models of learning and counterproductive techniques of motivation. The shift to talking about goals yields radical conclusions and wonderfully pungent essays that only Alfie Kohn could have written. From the title essay's challenge to conventional, conservative definitions of a good education to essays on standards and testing and grades that tally the severe educational costs of overemphasizing a narrow conception of achievement, Kohn boldly builds on his earlier work and writes for a wide audience. Kohn's new book will be greeted with enthusiasm by his many readers and by any teacher or parent looking for a refreshing perspective on today's debates about schools. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Encyclopedia of Educational Theory and Philosophy

Encyclopedia of Educational Theory and Philosophy

Education is a field sometimes beset by theories-of-the-day and with easy panaceas that overpromise the degree to which they can alleviate pressing educational problems. The two-volume Encyclopedia of Educational Theory and Philosophy introduces readers to theories that have stood the test of time and those that have provided the historical foundation for the best of contemporary educational theory and practice. Drawing together a team of international scholars, this invaluable reference examines the global landscape of all the key theories and the theorists behind them and presents them in the context needed to understand their strengths and weaknesses. In addition to interpretations of long-established theories, this work offers essays on cutting-edge research and concise, to-the-point definitions of key concepts, ideas, schools, and figures. Features: Over 300 signed entries by trusted experts in the field are organized into two volumes and overseen by a distinguished General Editor and an international Editorial Board. Entries are followed by cross references and further reading suggestions. A Chronology of Theory within the field of education highlights developments over the centuries; a Reader’s Guide groups entries thematically, and a master Bibliography facilitates further study. The Reader’s Guide, detailed index, and cross references combine for strong search-and-browse capabilities in the electronic version. Available in a choice of print or electronic formats, Encyclopedia of Educational Theory and Philosophy is an ideal reference for anyone interested in the roots of contemporary educational theory.

The Politics of Teacher Education Reform

The National Commission on Teaching and America's Future

The Politics of Teacher Education Reform

Yearbook of the Politics of Education Association. This is an educational policy book for students and researchers, and anyone interested in teacher education reform.

Two Rooms

Two Rooms

THE STORY: The two rooms of the title are a windowless cubicle in Beirut where an American hostage is being held by Arab terrorists and a room in his home in the United States, which his wife has stripped of furniture so that, at least symbolically

Teaching for Student Learning

Becoming an Accomplished Teacher

Teaching for Student Learning

Teaching for Student Learning: Becoming an Accomplished Teacher shows teachers how to move from novice to expert status by integrating both research and the wisdom of practice into their teaching. It emphasizes how accomplished teachers gradually acquire and apply a broad repertoire of evidence-based teaching practices in the support of student learning. The book’s content stems from three major fields of study: 1) theories and research on how people learn, including new insights from the cognitive and neurosciences; 2) research on classroom practices shown to have the greatest effect on student learning; and 3) research on effective schooling, defined as school-level factors that enhance student achievement and success. Although the book’s major focus is on teaching, it devotes considerable space to describing how students learn and how the most effective and widely-used models of teaching connect to principles of student learning. Specifically, it describes how research on teaching, cognition, and neuroscience converge to provide an evidence-based "science of learning" which teachers can use to advance their practice. Key features include the following: Evidence-Based Practice – This theme is developed through: 1) an ongoing review and synthesis of research on teaching and learning and the resulting guidelines for practice and 2) boxed research summaries within the chapters. Instructional Repertoire Theme – Throughout the book teaching is viewed as an extremely complex activity that requires a repertoire of instructional strategies that, once mastered, can be drawn upon to fit specific classrooms and teaching situations. Standards-based School Environments – Education today is dominated by standards-based school environments. Unlike competing books, this one describes these environments and shows how they impact curriculum design and learning activities. The objective is to show how teachers can make standards-based education work for them. Pedagogical Features – In addition to an end-of-book glossary, each chapter contains research boxes, reflection boxes, itemized end-of-chapter summaries, and end-of-chapter learning activities. Website – An accompanying website contains a variety of field-oriented and site-based activities that teachers can do alone or with colleagues.

Education and International Development

An Introduction

Education and International Development

'Honorable Mention' 2016 PROSE Award - Education Practice Education is fundamental to every aspect of development and there is widespread support across the world for policies that affirm that all children, regardless of their circumstances, have a right to quality schooling. Yet despite concerted efforts from national governments, multilateral organisations and NGOs over many decades we are still far from achieving education for all. In addition, while education can enhance human development, it is also associated with persistent inequalities. Education and International Development provides a comprehensive introduction to the field, giving an overview of the history, influential theories, important concepts and areas of achievement, and presenting a critical reflection on emerging trends in policy, practice and research. With chapters that review key challenges and inspiring initiatives in countries around the globe - focusing on critical issues such as language, conflict and teachers - this book serves both as a companion to graduate studies in international education and a concise reference book for practitioners and educators in the field.

Reports

Reports


Priorities in Religious Education

Priorities in Religious Education

A collection of articles which look at the future development of religious education in the light of the 1988 Education Reform Act and at how religious education should now develop in schools. It contains practical guidance for meetings and workshops and questions to stimulate further discussion.

Feel-bad Education

And Other Contrarian Essays on Children and Schooling

Feel-bad Education

One of education's most outspoken voices presents a challenging and entertaining writing on where we should go in American education. Kohn argues in the title essay with those who think that high standards mean joylessness in the classroom.