The Law s Disposal of a Person s Estate who Dies Without Will Or Testament

... and the next of kin to her obtained administration , and the husband sued for a repeal , a prohibition was denied ; because in this case the ordinary had no power , or election , to grant it to any person but the husband " .

The Law s Disposal of a Person s Estate who Dies Without Will Or Testament


Understanding What Makes a Person Unique A Multi pronged Approach

WHAT IS HUMAN UNIQUENESS? First and foremost, let me say that this is a tricky question for the simple fact that it involves so many different factors. And then, there is the fact that the answer you might give from a personal ...

Understanding What Makes a Person Unique  A Multi pronged Approach

This is a look into the different parameters that make a human being unique and that prove there has never been someone like you before you were born and that there will never be someone like you after you leave this world. The article considers human uniqueness on two levels: Biology and Environment, which, when combined, make each of us a unique being among the more than 7 billion who currently live on the planet. From fertilization to somatic death, we are all different. The article shows the balance between biology and the forces of our environment such as culture, government, faith, and technology. This article also considers the future of human uniqueness based on technological progress.

The Human Organism as a Person

The advent of split-brain study in animals and particularly in humans has ushered in a very significant realm of possibilities for human psychobiology. It helps us to see that relating organism and person is not the esoteric contrivance ...

The Human Organism as a Person


Authorship s Wake

49 Chris Kraus, “What Women Say to One Another: Sheila Heti's 'How Should a Person Be?'” Los Angeles Review of Books, June 18, 2012, https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/what-women-say-to-one-another-sheila-hetis-how-should-aperson-be/.

Authorship  s Wake

Authorship's Wake examines the aftermath of the 1960s critique of the author, epitomized by Roland Barthes's essay, “The Death of the Author.” This critique has given rise to a body of writing that confounds generic distinctions separating the literary and the theoretical. Its archive consists of texts by writers who either directly participated in this critique, as Barthes did, or whose intellectual formation took place in its immediate aftermath. These writers include some who are known primarily as theorists (Judith Butler), others known primarily as novelists (Zadie Smith, David Foster Wallace), and yet others whose texts are difficult to categorize (the autofiction of Chris Kraus, Sheila Heti, and Ben Lerner; the autotheory of Maggie Nelson). These writers share not only a central motivating question – how to move beyond the critique of the author-subject – but also a way of answering it: by writing texts that merge theoretical concerns with literary discourse. Authorship's Wake traces the responses their work offers in relation to four themes: communication, intention, agency, and labor.

Ethical Issues in Sexuality and Reproduction

valuable to some degree and that all human beings have a right to life, up to a point. ... it will also be a given that not all human life is equally valuable and that not every person has the same right to life as every other person.

Ethical Issues in Sexuality and Reproduction


What is the Human Being

Kant goes on to redefine this categorical imperative based on a particular feature of human willing: human beings not ... categorical imperative: “So act that you use humanity, whether in your own person or in the person of any other, ...

What is the Human Being

Philosophers, anthropologists and biologists have long puzzled over the question of human nature. It is also a question that Kant thought about deeply and returned to in many of his writings. In this lucid and wide-ranging introduction to Kant's philosophy of human nature - which is essential for understanding his thought as a whole - Patrick R. Frierson assesses Kant's theories and examines his critics. He begins by explaining how Kant articulates three ways of addressing the question 'what is the human being?': the transcendental, the empirical, and the pragmatic. He then considers some of the great theorists of human nature who wrestle with Kant's views, such as Hegel, Marx, Darwin, Nietzsche, and Freud; contemporary thinkers such as E.O.Wilson and Daniel Dennett, who have sought biological explanations of human nature; Thomas Kuhn, Michel Foucault, and Clifford Geertz, who emphasize the diversity of human beings in different times and places; and existentialist philosophers such as Sartre and Heidegger. He argues that whilst these approaches challenge and enrich Kant's views in significant ways, all suffer from serious weaknesses that Kant's anthropology can address. Taking a core insight of Kant's - that human beings are fundamentally free but finite - he argues that it is the existentialists, particularly Sartre, who are the most direct heirs of his transcendental anthropology. The final part of the book is an extremely helpful overview of the work of contemporary philosophers, particularly Christine Korsgaard and Jürgen Habermas. Patrick R. Frierson explains how these philosophers engage with questions of naturalism, historicism, and existentialism while developing Kantian conceptions of the human being. Including chapter summaries and annotated further reading, What is the Human Being? is an outstanding introduction to some fundamental aspects of Kant's thought and a judicious assessment of leading theories of human nature. It is essential reading for all students of Kant and the philosophy of human nature, as well as those in related disciplines such as anthropology, politics and sociology.

Can Death Be a Harm to the Person Who Dies

I think that perhaps this can explain why in some circumstances we do feel, and strongly believe, that a person's death (his death event or the event which brings about his death) is a welcome release for him; while we also feel that, ...

Can Death Be a Harm to the Person Who Dies

lt is with great pleasure that I write this preface for Or Li's book, wh ich addresses the venerable and vexing issues surrounding the problem of whether death can be a harm to the person who dies. This problem is an ancient one which was raised long ago by the early Greek philosopher Epicurus, who notoriously argued that death is at no time a harm to its 'victim' because before death there is no harrn and after death there is no victim. Epicurus's conclusion is conspicuously at odds with our prereflective and in most cases our post-reflective-intuitions, and numerous strategies have therefore been proposed to refute or avoid the Epicurean conclusion that death cannot be an evil after all. How then are we to account for our intuition that death is not just an evil, but perhaps the worst evil: that may befall us? This is the key issue that Or Li addresses. Or Li's book explores various alternative approaches to the complex and difficult issues surrounding Epicurus's notorious argument and provides a defence ofthe intuitively plausible conclusion that death can indeed be a harm to the person who dies. This challenge to Epicurus's claim that death is never a harm to the person who dies is developed by way of a detailed exploration of the issues raised not only by Epicurus, but also by his many successors, who have responded variously to the challenging issues which Epicurus raised.

Encyclopedia of World Problems and Human Potential

HH0180 Learning Description This term covers broadly the acquiring of knowledge, abilities and habits, in fact all that may be considered a person's experience. Basically, obligatory learning is the acquisition of skills necessary to ...

Encyclopedia of World Problems and Human Potential


Our Father Who Art a Person

We answer this question by looking at the actions we take on a human level to support a personal relationship. Through time we learn things about a person that either draws us closer to the person or causes separation.

Our Father Who Art a Person

The writings address the elementary factors associated with maintaining a personal relationship with God. The level of commitment to that relationship is detached from being validated by participating in organized religion. The writings are based on personal experiences with God as a personal friend.

Malaysian Human Rights Report

A person "shall be considered just if he does what is required by Islam and avoids committing great sins and does not continuously commit lesser sins and further has a sense of honour." There is a presumption that a person is "just" ...

Malaysian Human Rights Report


What Is a Human

human, you would no longer be considered human. Only those who learn human norms and values are considered human. If someone was raised by wolves they would not be human. • Each person should decide on their own who they consider to be ...

What Is a Human

"The debate over what makes human beings unique has raged for hundreds of years, and many believe it is urgent to convince others to accept their particular definition of what it is to be human. Despite these dire warnings, nobody has empirically examined whether particular definitions of a human actually lead to maltreatment. In this book sociologist John H. Evans does and concludes that the definitions of a human promoted by biologists and philosophers actually are associated with less support for human rights. Members of the public who agree with these definitions say they are less willing to sacrifice to stop genocides, and are more supportive of buying organs from poor people, experimenting on prisoners against their will, torturing people to potentially save lives, and having terminally ill people commit suicide to save money. It might appear that the assumptions of critics are empirically correct. However, Evans finds that these critics are actually only partially right, and a detailed examination of the public's views reveals a much more subtle and complex situation. First, he shows that only a minority of the general public agrees with the definitions associated with less support for human rights. Then, he shows that the public has its own definitions of a human being that are unlikely to lead to human rights abuses. So while the critics are right about the definitions of a human promoted by academic biologists and philosophers, at present their concern about widespread maltreatment is overblown"--

Calculus

How Fast Does a Person Learn? Suppose we are interested in how fast an employee learns a new task. One theory claims that the more the employee already knows of the task, the slower he or she learns. In other words, if y% is the ...

Calculus


Our Practices Our Selves Or What it Means to be Human

There can be a difference between a person's sense of who he or she is and the fact of the matter about who he or she is . ( Now who gets to decide what the fact of the matter is is a complex question . Let me duck it for my purposes ...

Our Practices  Our Selves  Or  What it Means to be Human

This enjoyable book, written in an engaging, colloquial voice, is that rare kind of introduction to philosophy that both (1) shows that philosophy is a distinctive form of lively conceptual activity rather than an inert body of dusty doctrines and (2) makes a contribution to the field it introduces by showing the importance of our multifarious human practices to questions of selfhood and identity. The fundamental thesis of the book--that practices are constitutive of the self in a deep way that has not been sufficiently recognized--is explored through wide-ranging examples, including global-technological capitalism, religious authority and the creationism debate, multiculturalism, psychoanalytical explanation, jazz, baseball, political activism, cooking, and many others. These diverse strands, although they obviously come from far and wide, are convincingly woven into a coherent and illuminating large-scale pattern.This book shows the student, the general reader, or anyone interested in what philosophy--itself a practice--how hard, clear thinking promotes human understanding and how helpful analytical thought can be to numerous hotly debated issues. Readers are given the conceptual tools and philosophical equipment they need as the book progresses, and they will know that they are in the hands of an excellent, confidence-inspiring teacher of the subject. -Garry L. Hagberg, Bard College

What It Means to Be Human

At a time when a person is most fragile and dependent on the care of others for basic needs, the law elevates freedom and self determination as its animating goods. In a moment when the patient cannot speak for himself, the law insists ...

What It Means to Be Human

American law assumes that individuals are autonomous, defined by their capacity to choose, and not obligated to each other. But our bodies make us vulnerable and dependent, and the law leaves the weakest on their own. O. Carter Snead argues for a paradigm that recognizes embodiment, enabling law and policy to provide for the care that people need.

The Infallibility of Human Judgment The Third Edition To which is Added a Supplement Answering All the Objections which Have Been Made to it With a Postscript Demonstrating Man to be a Free Agent Etc

Is it an intelligible Truth or Nonsense , and Falsehood to say , that a Person can be begorten of another : Person , and deriv'd from him , and yet be without Beginning ? Now this Argument is at a full End , because the Answer to this ...

The Infallibility of Human Judgment     The Third Edition  To which is Added  a Supplement  Answering All the Objections which Have Been Made to it     With a Postscript  Demonstrating Man to be a Free Agent  Etc


The Care of the Elderly Person

In the majority of cases the aged person accepts a reduced income in old age and makes every attempt to provide for himself without complaining. How many of us could do the same? The world of the aged person grows smaller as he ...

The Care of the Elderly Person