What Matter Who s Speaking

What Matter Who s Speaking


Identity Politics in Deconstruction

In this book Carolyn D'Cruz investigates the nexus between what David Birch describes as ’the seemingly impossible of high theory and the seemingly accessible possibilities of popular discourse’, as encountered in liberation movements ...

Identity Politics in Deconstruction

Identity politics dominates the organisation of liberation movements today. This is the case whether fighting over one's birthright to a nation, such as in the Palestinian/Israeli conflict; lobbying for civil rights, such as in gay and lesbian campaigns for marriage; or struggling for citizenry recognition as currently experienced by asylum seekers. In this book Carolyn D'Cruz investigates the nexus between what David Birch describes as ’the seemingly impossible of high theory and the seemingly accessible possibilities of popular discourse’, as encountered in liberation movements based on identity. D'Cruz reworks the logic of such movements through the unique combination of Derridean deconstruction, Foucauldian discourse and Levinasian ethics. Moving both within and between the domains of philosophy, politics and ’postmodern culture’ this book offers both a clear explication of complex philosophical issues and an understanding of how they relate to the political practicalities of everyday life.

Stories Texts for Nothing

What matter who's speaking, someone said what matter who's speaking. There's
going to be a departure, I'll be there, I won't miss it, it won't be me, I'll be here, I'll
say I'm far from here, it won't be me, I won't say anything, there's going to be a ...

Stories   Texts for Nothing

Characters relate in detail the experiences which shaped their personalities or reflect them vividly

Contextual Authority and Aesthetic Truth

Matter. Who's. Speaking?" In one of his most famous essays, Michel Foucault
asks "What Is an Author?" and he proceeds to articulate a good number of the
questions through which we have come to constitute our current ways of thinking.

Contextual Authority and Aesthetic Truth

This book explores the relationship between authority and context and attempts to establish the ways in which authority is a function of a particular agent or set of agents, and the degree to which it is a product of a context rather than an agent. The work is not a sociological or psychological study but rather a literary/philosophical speculation into the roots of our conceptions of authority. It declares all authority to be aesthetic in nature and is based on an analysis of several key texts from various different cultural backgrounds: Foucault, Weber, Nietzsche, Confucius, and Homer.

The Matter of Voice

I shall focus especially on speaking and writing, where voice has been less
attended to than in song. The melodic, timbral, and ... “What matter who's
speaking, someone said what matter who's speaking.”4 The speaker—someone
who is ...

The Matter of Voice

Philosophers for millennia have tried to silence the physical musicality of voice in favor of the purity of ideas without matter, souls without bodies. Nevertheless, voices resonate among bodies, among texts, and across denotation and sound; they are singular, as unique as fingerprints, but irreducibly collective too. They are material, somatic, and musical. But voices are also meaningful—they give body to concepts that cannot exist in abstractions, essential to sense yet in excess of it. They can be neither reduced to neurology nor silenced in abstraction. They complicate the logos of the beginning and emphasize the enfleshing of all words. Through explorations of theology and philosophy, pedagogy, translation, and semiotics, all interwoven with song, The Matter of Voice works toward reintegrating our thinking about both speaking and authorial voice as fleshy combinings of meaning and music.

Speech Stories

What matter who's speaking, someone said, what matter who's speaking? —
Samuel Beckett This is a story about anonymity, about speech with no named
author. While it is possible, as we shall see, for speech to have no author at all, in
our ...

Speech Stories

When we talk about what "freedom of speech" means in America, the discussion almost always centers on freedom rather than speech. Taking for granted that speech is an unambiguous and stable category, we move to considering how much freedom speech should enjoy. But, as Randall Bezanson demonstrates in Speech Stories, speech is a much more complicated and dynamic notion than we often assume. In an age of rapidly accelerated changes in discourse combined with new technologies of communication, the boundaries and substance of what we traditionally deem speech are being reconfigured in novel and confusing ways. In order to spark thought, discussion, and debate about these complexities and ambiguities, Bezanson probes the "stories" behind seven controversial free speech cases decided by the Supreme Court. These stories touch upon the most controversial and significant of contemporary first amendment issues: government restrictions on hate speech and obscene and indecent speech; pornography and the subordination of women; the constitutionality of campaign finance reform; and the treatment to be accorded new technologies of communication under the Constitution. The result is a provocative engagement of the reader in thinking about the puzzles and paradoxes of our commitment to free expression.

Profanations

In the audience (which included Jean Wahl, who introduced the lecture, Maurice
de Gandillac, Lucien Goldmann, and ... Foucault began his lecture with a quote
from Samuel Beckett (“What matter who's speaking, someone said what matter ...

Profanations

The Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben has always been an original reader of texts, understanding their many rich and multiple historical, aesthetic, and political meanings and effects. In Profanations, Agamben has assembled for the first time some of his most pivotal essays on photography, the novel, and film. A meditation on memory and oblivion, on what is lost and what remains, Profanations proves yet again that Agamben is one of the most provocative writers of our times. In ten essays, Agamben rethinks approaches to a series of literary and philosophical problems: the relation between genius, ego, and theories of subjectivity; the problem of messianic time as explicated in both images and lived experience; parody as a literary paradigm; the potential of magic to provide an ethical canon. The range of topics and themes addressed here attest to the very creativity of Agamben’s singular mode of thought and his persistent pursuit to grasp the act of witnessing, sometimes futile, sometimes earth-shattering — the talking cricket in Pinocchio; “helpers” in Kafka’s novels; pictorial representations of the Last Judgment, of anonymous female faces, and of Orson Wells’s infamous object of obsession Rosebud. “In Praise of Profanity,” the central essay of this small but dense book, confronts the question of profanity as the crucial political task of the moment. An act of resistance to every form of separation, the concept of profanation — as both the “return to common usage” and “sacrifice” — reorients perceptions of how power, consumption, and use interweave to produce an urgent political modality and desire: to profane the unprofanable. In short, Agamben provides not only a new and potent theoretical model but also a writerly style that itself forges inescapable links between literature, politics, and philosophy.

Nabokov and Nietzsche

Indeed, in relation to Beckett's phrase 'what matter who's speaking, someone
said, what matter who's speaking' (1974:16), Foucault claims that “we must
recognize [this question] as one of the fundamental ethical principles of
contemporary ...

Nabokov and Nietzsche

Awarded the Jane Grayson Prize by the International Vladimir Nabokov Society Nabokov and Nietzsche: Problems and Perspectives addresses the many knotted issues in the work of Vladimir Nabokov – Lolita's moral stance, Pnin's relationship with memory, Pale Fire's ambiguous internal authorship – that often frustrate interpretation. It does so by arguing that the philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche, as both a conceptual instrument and a largely unnoticed influence on Nabokov himself, can help to untie some of these knots. The study addresses the fundamental problems in Nabokov's writing that make his work perplexing, mysterious and frequently uneasy rather than simply focusing on the literary puzzles and games that, although inherent, do not necessarily define his body of work. Michael Rodgers shows that Nietzsche's philosophy provides new, but not always palatable, perspectives in order to negotiate interpretative impasses, and that the uneasy aspects of Nabokov's work offer the reader manifold rewards.

Pynchon and Philosophy

Matter. Who's. Speaking? The writingsofThomas Pynchonhavespawned more
criticalcommentary than almost any otherAmerican authorofthelastfifty years.
Pynchon'stexts are perhaps most famed fortheir'difficulty and apparent
unfriendliness', ...

Pynchon and Philosophy

Pynchon and Philosophy radically reworks our readings of Thomas Pynchon alongside the theoretical perspectives of Wittgenstein, Foucault and Adorno. Rigorous yet readable, Pynchon and Philosophy seeks to recover philosophical readings of Pynchon that work harmoniously, rather than antagonistically, resulting in a wholly fresh approach.

Music and the Cultures of Print

CHAPTER 6 Authors and Anonyms Recovering the Anonymous Subject in
Cinquecento Vernacular Objects * MARTHA FELDMAN " What matter who's
speaking , " someone said , " what matter who's speaking . " ! The line is Beckett's
, but the ...

Music and the Cultures of Print

First Published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Writing Robert Greene

Chapter 6 Forming Greene: Theorizing the Early Modern Author in the
Groatsworth of Wit Steve Mentz What matter who's speaking, someone said what
matter who's speaking ... I'll be there, I won't miss it, it won't be me, I'll be here, I'll
say I'm ...

Writing Robert Greene

Robert Greene, contemporary of Shakespeare and Marlowe and member of the group of six known as the "University Wits," is the subject of this essay collection, the first to be dedicated solely to his work. Although in his short lifetime Greene published some three dozen prose works, composed at least five plays, and was one of the period's most recognized-even notorious-literary figures, his place within the canon of Renaissance writers has been marginal at best. Writing Robert Greene offers a reappraisal of Greene's career and of his contribution to Elizabethan culture. Rather than drawing lines between Greene's work for the pamphlet market and for the professional theatres, the essays in the volume imagine his writing on a continuum. Some essays trace the ways in which Greene's poetry and prose navigate differing cultural economies. Others consider how the full spectrum of his writing contributes to an emergent professional discourse about popular print and theatrical culture. The volume includes an annotated bibliography of recent scholarship on Greene and three valuable appendices (presenting apocrypha; edition information; and editions organized by year of publication).

Live Cheap die Cheap

I answered the phone. 'Hello, Graham here.' 'Can I speak to your mum please?' a
male voice asked. Me, not knowing what to say, I just simply said, 'Sorry she's not
here. Who's speaking?' Him: 'It doesn't matter who I am. I would like to speak ...

Live Cheap   die Cheap

Inside into the Time-share business, a world where drugs, violence, money and corruption go hand in hand, it will induce tears of sadness and tears of laughter; you will be shocked and appalled, amazed and inspired; you will propel from admiration and respect and end up reeling in disgust. But ultimately, you will feel.

The Logic of Fetishism

Who is speaking thus? — Roland Barthes, "The Death of the Author' Behind all
these questions we would hear little more than the murmur of indifference: "What
matter who's speaking?" — Michel Foucault, "What Is an Author?" In HIS 1964 ...

The Logic of Fetishism

Cuban author Alejo Carpentier (1904-1980) was a key figure in the foundation of contemporary Latin American fiction. By taking a critical position vis-a-vis the restitutionary current in Latin American studies, James Pancrazio provides a highly innovative re-reading of Carpentier's work.

War Memory Nationalism and Education in Postwar Japan

''Who can fulfill these diverse functions of the subject?'' Behind all these
questions we would hear little more than the murmur of indifference: ''What matter
who's speaking?'' Michel Foucault, ''What Is An Author?'' On August 15, 1945, the
day ...

War Memory  Nationalism and Education in Postwar Japan

The controversy over official state-approved history textbooks in Japan, which omit or play down many episodes of Japan’s occupation of neighbouring countries during the Asia-Pacific War (1931-1945), and which have been challenged by critics who favour more critical, peace and justice perspectives, goes to the heart of Japan’s sense of itself as a nation. The degree to which Japan is willing to confront its past is not just about history, but also about how Japan defines itself at present, and going forward. This book examines the history textbook controversy in Japan. It sets the controversy in the context of debates about memory, and education, and in relation to evolving politics both within Japan, and in Japan’s relations with its neighbours and former colonies and countries it invaded. It discusses in particular the struggles of Ienaga Saburo, who has made crucial contributions, including through three epic lawsuits, in challenging the official government position. Winner of the American Educational Research Association 2009 Outstanding Book Award in the Curriculum Studies category.

Burdens of Proof

and his own response from Beckett, “What matter who's speaking?” resonate
throughout discussion of imposture in autobiography. I set out to demonstrate in
Chapter 2 how volatile the relations were between an apparently identifiable
author ...

Burdens of Proof

Autobiographical impostures, once they come to light, appear to us as outrageous, scandalous. They confuse lived and textual identity (the person in the world and the character in the text) and call into question what we believe, what we doubt, and how we receive information. In the process, they tell us a lot about cultural norms and anxieties. Burdens of Proof: Faith, Doubt, and Identity in Autobiography examines a broad range of impostures in the United States, Canada, and Europe, and asks about each one: Why this particular imposture? Why here and now? Susanna Egan’s historical survey of texts from early Christendom to the nineteenth century provides an understanding of the author in relation to the text and shows how plagiarism and other false claims have not always been regarded as the frauds we consider them today. She then explores the role of the media in the creation of much contemporary imposture, examining in particular the cases of Jumana Hanna, Norma Khouri, and James Frey. The book also addresses ethnic imposture, deliberate fictions, plagiarism, and ghostwriting, all of which raise moral, legal, historical, and cultural issues. Egan concludes the volume with an examination of how historiography and law failed to support the identities of European Jews during World War II, creating sufficient instability in Jewish identity and doubt about Jewish wartime experience that the impostor could step in. This textual erasure of the Jews of Europe and the refashioning of their experiences in fraudulent texts are examples of imposture as an outcrop of extreme identity crisis. The first to examine these issues in North America and Europe, Burdens of Proof will be of interest to scholars of life writing and cultural studies.

What It Takes Speak Up Step Up Move Up

Among her job responsibilities, Abby secures visasfor company employees
whotravel internationally for business. ... Once a mistake occurs, no matter who's
at fault, we have two choices: relive it and chastise ourselves or forgive ourselves
and ...

What It Takes  Speak Up  Step Up  Move Up

Amy Henry, a formidable businesswoman and the last woman standing on NBC's hit reality show The Apprentice, shares her experiences, tips, and in-your-face advice for moving up in today's workplace. Yes, men have written the rules for a long time---in What It Takes, Amy Henry shows young businesswomen how to make those rules work for them. With a ten-year career in business, Amy has shown she has what it takes---determination, brains, creativity, professionalism, and charm---to thrive in today's business world. What It Takes is an in-depth look at the strategies and tactics Amy uses to make the workplace work for her. With examples from Amy's and other businesswomen's real-life experiences, as well as advice from experts, What It Takes is the most honest guide for women in the workplace available today. Hip, frank, and controversial, What It Takes is the ultimate guide to the reality of today's business world---and Amy Henry is the new model for young businesswomen.

How to Speak Like a Pro

Then, no matter who's running the thing—bumbling beginner or trained
technician– you can take over and turn the equipment off when it's not operating
as it should. And that happens more times than Marconi, Edison, and all those
other great ...

How to Speak Like a Pro

More than snakes, more than deep water, even more than death, people cite public speaking as their greatest fear. But with more than seventy percent of our jobs requiring the effective presentation of ideas to a group, you need to know “how to speak like a pro.” • Seven tips to control stage fright • How to select your subject, gather ideas, and present information • How to start, organize, and end your speech • The importance of practicing—and the dangers of over-practicing • How to seem spontaneous, yet be prepared • How to deal with distractions—from hecklers to crying babies • Eight easy-to-follow steps to preparing and presenting a speech and more With handy checklists after each chapter!

A Companion to Media Authorship

''What Matter Who's Speaking?'' (Samuel Beckett, Texts for Nothing) Fraught
Authorship and its Ethical Implications Binjamin Wilkomirski's 1995 novel
Fragments proclaims itself a survivor account depicting the author's fragmented
and ...

A Companion to Media Authorship

A Companion to Media Authorship offers 28 groundbreaking chapters which investigate the practices, attributions, and meanings of authorship. Revitalizing the study within media and cultural studies, this diverse and global collection provides the definitive work on the subject. Rethinks cultures of authorship and challenges the concept of auteurism across multiple media forms Moves beyond notions of the individual to focus on how authorship is collaborative, contested, and networked, examining cultures of authorship and the practicalities of how it works Draws on the cutting-edge research of scholars and practitioners whose work has produced significant new insights into the field Examines a wide range of media, including television, social media, radio, videogames, transmedia, music, and comic books Offers an impressive global focus, including pieces on Mexican music, amateur film production in Nairobi slums, tele-serial production in Kinshasa, Hong Kong film, and the marketing of Bollywood

Shakespeare s Medieval Craft

Or rather (if we put aside our tendency to privilege the modern at the expense of
the medieval) the past, by virtue of its obsolescence, asserts its topicality.
Epilogue Riding the Banns beyond Shakespeare What matter who's speaking?

Shakespeare s Medieval Craft

In Shakespeare’s Medieval Craft, Kurt A. Schreyer explores the relationship between Shakespeare’s plays and a tradition of late medieval English biblical drama known as mystery plays. Scholars of English theater have long debated Shakespeare’s connection to the mystery play tradition, but Schreyer provides new perspective on the subject by focusing on the Chester Banns, a sixteenth-century proclamation announcing the annual performance of that city’s cycle of mystery plays. Through close study of the Banns, Schreyer demonstrates the central importance of medieval stage objects—as vital and direct agents and not merely as precursors—to the Shakespearean stage. As Schreyer shows, the Chester Banns serve as a paradigm for how Shakespeare’s theater might have reflected on and incorporated the mystery play tradition, yet distinguished itself from it. For instance, he demonstrates that certain material features of Shakespeare’s stage—including the ass’s head of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, the theatrical space of Purgatory in Hamlet, and the knocking at the gate in the Porter scene of Macbeth—were in fact remnants of the earlier mysteries transformed to meet the exigencies of the commercial London playhouses. Schreyer argues that the ongoing agency of supposedly superseded theatrical objects and practices reveal how the mystery plays shaped dramatic production long after their demise. At the same time, these medieval traditions help to reposition Shakespeare as more than a writer of plays; he was a play-wright, a dramatic artisan who forged new theatrical works by fitting poetry to the material remnants of an older dramatic tradition.

The Character of Criticism

What Matter Who's Speaking Many years ago, I acquired a marvelous book
called Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds.
Written by Charles Mackay in 1841, it had been reissued in paperback in 1970,
one ...

The Character of Criticism

Why are some critical texts more compelling, memorable, or engaging than others? Can criticism be judged as a discourse of description, explanation, and analysis alone, or do our evaluations reflect other kinds of investments in it? In this book, Geoffrey Galt Harpham argues that the most powerful and effective criticism demands to be read as an expression of a distinctive sensibility, a way of being in the world; it demands, in other words, to be read as a discourse of character. Through a series of detailed and intimate intellectual portraits of leading critics--Elaine Scarry, Martha Nussbaum, Slavoj Zizek, and Edward Said--Harpham unfolds the complex and indirect ways in which human character is expressed in criticism. A final chapter on "Criticism in a State of Terror" assesses the contemporary situation. The Character of Criticism represents not just a snapshot of contemporary criticism but a fresh approach to criticism itself that clarifies the stakes involved for writers and readers of criticism alike. It does so not by making difficult thinking easy but by making it stranger--more idiosyncratic, exotic, and singular.