When the Children Came Home

Stories of Wartime Evacuees

When the Children Came Home

A moving and revealing insight into the real experiences of children evacuated during WWII and the families they left behind On 1 September 1939 Operation Pied Piper bgan to place the children of Britain's industrial cities beyond the reach of the Luftwaffe. 1.5 million children, pregnant women and schoolteachers were evacuated in 3 days. A further 2 million children were evacuated privately; the largest mass evacuation of children in British history. Some children went abroad, others were sent to institutions, but the majority were billeted with foster families. Some were away for weeks or months, others for years. Homecoming was not always easy and a few described it as more difficult than going away in the first place. In When the Children Came Home Julie Summers tells us what happened when these children returned to their families. She looks at the different waves of British evacuation during WWII and explores how they coped both in the immediate aftermath of the war, and in later life. For some it was a wonderful experience that enriched their whole lives, for others it cast a long shadow, for a few it changed things for ever. Using interviews, written accounts and memoirs, When the Children Came Homeweaves together a collection of personal stories to create a warm and compelling portrait of wartime Britain from the children's perspective.

Mythology of the Blackfoot Indians

Mythology of the Blackfoot Indians

Mythology of the Blackfoot Indians, originally published in 1908 by the American Museum of Natural History, introduces such figures as Old Man, Scar-Face, Blood-Clot, and the Seven Brothers. Included are tales with ritualistic origins emphasizing the prototypical Beaver-Medicine and the roles played by Elk-Woman and Otter-Woman, and a presentation of Star Myths, which reveal the astronomical knowledge of the Blackfoot Indians. Narratives about Raven, Grasshopper, and Whirlwind-Boy account for conditions in humanity and nature. Many of the stories in the concluding group-like "The Lost Children" and "The Ghost-Woman"-were tales told to Blackfoot children. Clark Wissler notes that these narratives were collected very early in the twentieth century from the Piegans in Montana and from the North Piegans, Bloods, and Northern Blackfoot in Canada. Most were translated by D. C. Duvall and revised for Mythology of the Blackfoot Indians by Wissler. Wissler (1870-1947) was curator at the American Museum of Natural History and chairman of the Department of Anthropology at Columbia University. Among his major works are North American Indians of the Plains and Man and Culture. Introducing this Bison Book edition is Alice B. Kehoe, a professor of sociology and anthropology at Marquette University and the author of North American Indians: A Comprehensive Account.

Mythology of the Blackfoot Indians

Mythology of the Blackfoot Indians

Mythology of the Blackfoot Indians, originally published in 1908 by the American Museum of Natural History, introduces such figures as Old Man, Scar-Face, Blood-Clot, and the Seven Brothers. Included are tales with ritualistic origins emphasizing the prototypical Beaver-Medicine and the roles played by Elk-Woman and Otter-Woman, as well as a presentation of Star Myths, which reveal the astronomical knowledge of the Blackfoot Indians. Narratives about Raven, Grasshopper, and Whirlwind-Boy account for conditions in humanity and nature. Many of the stories in the concluding group, such as ?The Lost Children? and ?The Ghost-Woman,? were tales told to Blackfoot children. ø These narratives were collected early in the twentieth century from the Piegans in Montana and from the North Piegans, the Bloods, and the Northern Blackfoot in Canada. Most were translated by D. C. Duvall and revised for Mythology of the Blackfoot Indians by Clark Wissler. Darrell Kipp provides an introduction to the new Bison Books edition.

Gloria!

The Archbishop's Wife

Gloria!

The wife of an Anglican bishop could expect a life of peace and comfort. But Benjamin Kwashi is the bishop of Jos in Nigeria, a place that is torn by Muslim-Christian violence. Gloria Kwashi has had her home burnt down and has endured rape and beatings. One of the beatings left her blinded, until surgery was able to restore her sight. Despite this, she continues to reach out to widows and orphans and supports her husband in his remarkable ministry in Northern Nigeria. This book is a record of love and endurance that should stimulate us to examine our own lives and how we respond to adversity.

When He Came Home

When He Came Home

Dr. Jill Edwards's husband has come home to Blackberry Hill—just not home to her. Jill and Grant have been separated for over a year now, and while both agree it was for the best, neither has quite been able to start official divorce proceedings. Just knowing Grant is back in town is confusing and painful and—dare she say it?—hopeful. Grant returns to Blackberry Hill with plenty of reservations. With his father in the hospital, Grant is left to pick up the pieces of his law practice. And his marriage? Grant fears those pieces are scattered too far to be reassembled. And yet he can't seem to stay away from Jill. It's a vicious cycle that he can't break…until one night changes everything.

One Came Home

One Came Home

A Newbery Honor Book An ALA-ALSC Notable Children's Book Winner of the Edgar Allan Poe Award for Best Juvenile Novel “An adventure, a mystery, and a love song to the natural world. . . . Run out and read it. Right now.”—Newbery Medalist Karen Cushman In the town of Placid, Wisconsin, in 1871, Georgie Burkhardt is known for two things: her uncanny aim with a rifle and her habit of speaking her mind plainly. But when Georgie blurts out something she shouldn't, her older sister Agatha flees, running off with a pack of "pigeoners" trailing the passenger pigeon migration. And when the sheriff returns to town with an unidentifiable body—wearing Agatha's blue-green ball gown—everyone assumes the worst. Except Georgie. Refusing to believe the facts that are laid down (and coffined) before her, Georgie sets out on a journey to find her sister. She will track every last clue and shred of evidence to bring Agatha home. Yet even with resolute determination and her trusty Springfield single-shot, Georgie is not prepared for what she faces on the western frontier.

The Yukaghir and the Yukaghirized Tungus

The Yukaghir and the Yukaghirized Tungus

As the first profound anthropological descriptions of that region, the publications of the Jesup North Pacific Expedition, undertaken in the first years of the 20th century, marked the beginning of a new era of research in Russia. Jochelson's work the Yukaghir and the Yukaghirized Tungus, for which he also draws on results of his earlier fieldwork in that area, was an important milestone for Russian and North American anthropology that provides to this day a unique contribution to thoroughly understanding the cultures of northeastern Siberia.

The Lucia Rider

The Lucia Rider

About the book The Lucia Rider consists of three novellas, each self-contained. The novellas were inspired by a city or by a countryside or by a folklore, where the author was living or visiting.

With a Prehistoric People

The Akikuyu of British East Africa

With a Prehistoric People

An account of the method of life and mode of thought amongst a nation on its first contact with European civilization.