Where Opportunity Beckons

Where Opportunity Beckons


Clarence Dillon

Clarence Dillon was convinced there were major financing opportunities
beckoning private capital to Europe. In 1922, Dillon told the New York Times: Our
opportunity lies in industrial Europe. . . . The railroad and public utility financing
that is ...

Clarence Dillon

A biography of a Polish immigrant who rose to the top of Wall Street in the Roaring Twenties and abandoned it after the Crash.

Catalog of Copyright Entries New Series

Sept. 21 , 1922 ; 2c . and aff . Vlar . 31 , 1923 ; A 698810 ; Lehigh and New
England railroad co . ( 23-9602 ) Where opportunity beckons ... Bethlehem , Pa . ,
Traffic department , Lehigh and New England railroad company ( * 1922 52 p .
front .

Catalog of Copyright Entries  New Series

Part 1, Books, Group 1, v. 20 : Nos. 1 - 125 (Issued April, 1923 - May, 1924)

The Jew in the American World

THE ECONOMIC WORLD OF THE AMERICANJEw 1922–1966 country for a half
century. Many were culturally ... they could survive comfortably. They flocked to
the largest cities, the obvious nurseries of wealth, where opportunity beckoned.

The Jew in the American World

This important volume provides the first complete single-volume reference source for American Jewish history.

The Magazine of Wall Street and Business Analyst

Present Investment Conservatism Favors the Return of Fixed Income Bearing
Securities to Popular Favor Will the Bond Market of 1922 Return ? Opportunity
Beckons in Bonds By Russel TAYTE A Period Duration 28 months are 16 15 26
25 61 ...

The Magazine of Wall Street and Business Analyst


Civil Engineering

URBAN AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT Vaal Barrage sluice gates construction ,
1922 Steenbras Dam site staff 1926 90 2002 ) Opportunity beckons ( ore than
one thousand. One of Thomas Stewart ' s dam walls on Table Mountain Above ...

Civil Engineering


Innovative Consumer Co operatives

Gide, C., 1922, Consumers' Co-operative Societies, New York, Alfred A Knopf.
Graff, M., Kenwood ... 303–330. Hallsworth, A., and Bell, J., 2003 “Retail Change
and the United Kingdom Co-operative Movement – New Opportunity Beckoning?

Innovative Consumer Co operatives

Consumer co-operatives provide a different approach to organizing business through their ideals of member ownership and democratic practice. Every co-operative member has an equal vote regardless of his or her own personal capital investment. The co-operative movement can also be an important force in promoting development and self-sufficiency in poorer areas, particularly in non-industrialised countries. This book explores in depth the fortunes of the Berkeley Consumer Co-operative, which became the largest consumer co-operative in the United States with 116,000 members in 1984 and viewed nationally as a leader in innovative retail practices and a champion of consumer rights. The Berkeley Consumer Co-operative is promoted by both supporters and opponents of the co-operative business model as a significant example of what can go wrong with the co-operatives. This book will provide the first in depth analysis of the history of the Berkeley Co-operative using its substantial but little used archives and oral histories to explore what the Berkeley experience means for the co-operative business model. The specific chapters relating to Berkeley will be organised around particular themes to highlight the issues relating to the co-operative business model and the local context of Berkeley. The themes relate to developments in Berkeley and the Bay Area in terms of the economy, politics and the retail environment; the management of the Berkeley co-operative, looking at governance, financial management and strategic decisions; relationship of management with members and employees; and finally, the relationship of the Berkeley Co-operative with the community. The core message of the book is that it is not inevitable that consumer co-operatives fail, but that the story of Berkeley story can provide insights that can strengthen the co-operative business model and minimise failures on the scale of Berkeley occurring in the future.

International Index

International Index

These vols. contain the same material as the early vols. of Social sciences & humanities index.

Bankers Magazine

1922. Acceptances, bankers' (Robert O'Hara) ...... 36 Accountant, what the banker
expects from the (John N. Eaton)) .......................------------- 645 Achievements of
the Washington confer---- ------...- ------- Advertisers, Bankers Magazine 14 ...

Bankers Magazine


The Bankers Magazine

January to June , 1922 1. ... Banking system , legitimate fruits of political Bank
men , opportunity beckons to young ( Allan F. Wright ) Bank's loanable funds ,
increasing a ( J. G. Jaudon ) Banks , why they keep a part of the money they loan
 ...

The Bankers Magazine


Journal of the Institute of Bankers

Under the title “ Opportunity Beckons to Young Bank Men , " Mr. Allan F. Wright
enunciates principles which determine ... conclusions are put forward as to the 66
D general objectives which the policy of the British Commonwealth should 1922 .

Journal of the Institute of Bankers


Hydrocarbon Processing

Retirement Like GraduationMany New Opportunities Beckon. c PETROLEUM 1.
SULPHURIC Acid ... These are a few of the many items which appeared in the
September and October, 1922 issues of The Refiner. These happened to be Nos.
1 ...

Hydrocarbon Processing


The Chinese in Toronto from 1878

1885–1922. THE. BIRTH. OF. TORONTO'S. CHINATOWN,. 1885–1922. As long
as the flint remains, the seeds offire will never ... Opportunities for starting small
businesses beckoned where Chinese communities were smaller and
antiChinese ...

The Chinese in Toronto from 1878

The Chinese have become a vibrant part of Toronto’s multiculturalism, with no less than seven Chinatowns created since 1984. Short-listed for the 2013 Speaker’s Book Award and for the 2012 Heritage Toronto Award The modest beginnings of the Chinese in Toronto and the development of Chinatown is largely due to the completion of the CPR in 1885. No longer requiring the services of the Chinese labourers, a hostile British Columbia sent them eastward in search of employment and a more welcoming place. In 1894 Toronto’s Chinese population numbered fifty. Today, no less than seven Chinatowns serve what has become the second-largest visible minority in the city, with a population of half a million. In these pages, you will find their stories told through historical accounts, archival and present-day photographs, newspaper clippings, and narratives from old-timers and newcomers. With achievements spanning all walks of life, the Chinese in Toronto are no longer looking in from outside society’s circle. Their lives are a vibrant part of the diverse mosaic that makes Toronto one of the most multicultural cities in the world.

Harness Herald

Every time there is work to be done him know that I am still alive . which no one
else wants to do , opportunity beckons I had ... BUY Ventiples Tractor Men
Desperate a Price cuts reported by newspapers , 18 Harness Herald . March ,
1922 .

Harness Herald


Spirits Rejoice

Other languages beckon, both opportunity and transgression. Jason Kao Hwang
told me that any consideration of jazz and religion took one necessarily into the “
postlinguistic.”39 So when Hart Crane urged, as early as 1922, “Let us invent an
 ...

Spirits Rejoice

In Spirits Rejoice! Jason Bivins explores the relationship between American religion and American music, and the places where religion and jazz have overlapped. Much writing about jazz tends toward glorified discographies or impressionistic descriptions of the actual sounds. Rather than providing a history, or series of biographical entries, Spirits Rejoice! takes to heart a central characteristic of jazz itself and improvises, generating a collection of themes, pursuits, reoccurring foci, and interpretations. Bivins riffs on interviews, liner notes, journals, audience reception, and critical commentary, producing a work that argues for the centrality of religious experiences to any legitimate understanding of jazz, while also suggesting that jazz opens up new interpretations of American religious history. Bivins examines themes such as musical creativity as related to specific religious traditions, jazz as a form of ritual and healing, and jazz cosmologies and metaphysics. Spirits Rejoice! connects Religious Studies to Jazz Studies through thematic portraits, and a vast number of interviews to propose a new, improvisationally fluid archive for thinking about religion, race, and sound in the United States. Bivins's conclusions explore how the sound of spirits rejoicing challenges not only prevailing understandings of race and music, but also the way we think about religion. Spirits Rejoice! is an essential volume for any student of jazz, American religion, or American culture.

Broken Face In The Mirror Crooks and Fallen Stars That Look Very Much Like Us

This dream was born when as a youngster he got the opportunity to attend a
theatrical performance and was dazzled by ... His work and the gay network were
probably responsible for getting his name before people in Hollywood, who
beckoned him, ... By 1922 he was designing costumes for the tempestuous Pola
Negri.

Broken Face In The Mirror  Crooks and Fallen Stars That Look Very Much Like Us


Review of Reviews and World s Work

But into a better job , again increasing his as in 1922 — a few forward - thinking
men pay ! ... And that is all opportunity beckoning to you— “ The that is necessary
with LaSalle ; our plan greatest need of American business today takes care of ...

Review of Reviews and World s Work


Lincoln in His Own Time

From The Real Lincoln (1922) Jesse W. Weik Best known as William H.
Herndon's collaborator on his famous biography of Lincoln, Jesse William Weik ...
Ultimately, Herndon became convinced that he and Weik should collaborate on a
book, and Weik leaped at the opportunity. Herndon ... He therefore beckoned to
Nicolay, who provided paper and pencil, and he proceeded to comply with the
request.

Lincoln in His Own Time

More than any other American before or since, Abraham Lincoln had a way with words that has shaped our national idea of ourselves. Actively disliked and even vilified by many Americans for the vast majority of his career, this most studied, most storied, and most documented leader still stirs up controversy. Showing not only the development of a powerful mind but the ways in which our sixteenth president was perceived by equally brilliant American minds of a decidedly literary and political bent, Harold K. Bush’s Lincoln in His Own Time provides some of the most significant contemporary meditations on the Great Emancipator’s legacy and cultural significance. The forty-two entries in this spirited collection present the best reflections of Lincoln as thinker, reader, writer, and orator by those whose lives intertwined with his or those who had direct contact with eyewitnesses. Bush focuses on Lincoln’s literary interests, reading, and work as a writer as well as the evolving debate about his religious views that became central to his memory. Along with a star-struck Walt Whitman writing of Lincoln’s “inexpressibly sweet” face and manner, Elizabeth Keckly’s description of a bereaved Lincoln, “genius and greatness weeping over love’s idol lost,” and William Stoddard’s report of the “cheery, hopeful, morning light” on Lincoln’s face after a long night debating the fate of the nation, the volume includes selections from works by famous contemporary figures such as Hawthorne, Douglass, Stowe, Lowell, Twain, and Lincoln himself in addition to lesser-known selections that have been nearly lost to history. Each entry is introduced by a headnote that places the selection in historical and cultural context; explanatory endnotes provide information about people and places. A comprehensive introduction and a detailed chronology of Lincoln’s eventful life round out the volume. Bush’s thoughtful collection reveals Lincoln as a man of letters who crafted some of the most memorable lines in our national vocabulary, explores the striking mythologization of the martyred president that began immediately upon his death, and then combines these two themes to illuminate Lincoln’s place in public memory as the absolute embodiment of America’s mythic civil religion. Beyond providing the standard fare of reminiscences about the rhetorically brilliant backwoodsman from the “Old Northwest,” Lincoln in His Own Time also maps a complex genealogy of the cultural work and iconic status of Lincoln as quintessential scribe and prophet of the American people.