Black Power White Blood

Spain's personal transformation is the heart of the book, but Andrews frames it within an indictment of intolerance and injustice that gives this individual's story broad significance.

Black Power  White Blood

Originally published in hardcover to much acclaim, this vividly written biographical drama will now be available in a paperback edition and includes a new epilogue by the author. Conceived within a clandestine relationship between a black man and a married white woman, Spain was born (as Larry Michael Armstrong) in Mississippi during the mid-1950s. Spain's life story speaks to the destructive power of racial bias. Even if his mother's husband were willing to accept the boy-which he was not-a mixed-race child inevitably would come to harm in that place and time. At six years old, already the target of name-calling children and threatening adults, he could not attend school with his older brother. Only decades later would he be told why the Armstrongs sent him to live with a black family in Los Angeles. As Johnny came of age, he thought of himself as having been rejected by his white family as well as by his black peers. His erratic, destructive behavior put him on a collision course with the penal system; he was only seventeen when convicted of murder and sent to Soledad. Drawn into the black power movement and the Black Panther Party by a fellow inmate, the charismatic George Jackson, Spain became a dynamic force for uniting prisoners once divided by racial hatred. He committed himself to the cause of prisoners' rights, impressing inmates, prison officials, and politicians with his intelligence and passion. Nevertheless, among the San Quentin Six, only he was convicted of conspiracy after Jackson's failed escape attempt. Lori Andrews, a professor of law, vividly portrays the dehumanizing conditions in the prisons, the pervasive abuses in the criminal justice system, and the case for overturning Spain's conspiracy conviction. Spain's personal transformation is the heart of the book, but Andrews frames it within an indictment of intolerance and injustice that gives this individual's story broad significance. Author note: Lori Andrewsteaches at Chicago-Kent Law School and has been named one of the 100 Most Influential Lawyers in America by theNational Law Journal. One of the foremost experts on the policy of genetics and reproduction, she is author ofThe Clone Age: Adventures in the New World of Reproductive Technology.

Whiate Lawyer Black Power

Whiate Lawyer  Black Power


White Lawyer Black Power A Memoir of Civil Rights Activism in the Deep South

John Dittmer, professor emeritus of American history at DePauw University and author of Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi, provides a foreword.

White Lawyer  Black Power  A Memoir of Civil Rights Activism in the Deep South

Inspired by a colleague's involvement in the Mississippi Summer Project of 1964, Wall Street attorney Donald A. Jelinek traveled to the Deep South to volunteer as a civil rights lawyer during his three-week summer vacation in 1965. He stayed for three years. In White Lawyer, Black Power, Jelinek recounts the battles he fought in defense of militant civil rights activists and rural African Americans, risking his career and his life to further the struggle for racial equality as an organizer for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and an attorney for the Lawyers Constitutional Defense Committee of the American Civil Liberties Union. Jelinek arrived in the Deep South at a pivotal moment in the movement's history as frustration over the failure of the 1964 Civil Rights Act to improve the daily lives of southern blacks led increasing numbers of activists to question the doctrine of nonviolence. Jelinek offers a fresh perspective that emphasizes the complex dynamics and relationships that shaped the post-1965 black power era. Replete with sharply etched, complex portraits of the personalities Jelinek encountered, from the rank-and-file civil rights workers who formed the backbone of the movement to the younger, more radical, up-and-coming leaders like Stokely Carmichael and H. "Rap" Brown, White Lawyer, Black Power provides a powerful and sometimes harrowing firsthand account of one of the most significant struggles in American history. John Dittmer, professor emeritus of American history at DePauw University and author of Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi, provides a foreword.

Black Power Black Lawyer

"Black Power, Black Lawyer traces the rebellious journey of a young woman coming of age during the Black Power era and the social justice lawyer she becomes"--

Black Power  Black Lawyer

Black Power, Black Lawyer is a memoir that stitches suspense, calamity, humor and wit into a tapestry of history, politics, law, culture and romance. Both serious and scandalous, Nkechi Taifa's audacious quest for justice is a gripping commentary on life; the perennial nature of human resistance against oppression; and her earnest embrace of what is fair and correct. Sometimes raw, sometimes abrasive, sometimes passionate, Taifa offers her truth, unapologetically and unfiltered, with honesty and authenticity. Her memoir is the story of a quest rarely told. The search for the resisters and the rebellious; the pursuit of issues on the cutting edge. Although there are memoirs that chronicle iconic leaders striving for justice during the civil rights era, there is scant reminiscence of the transformative journeys for self-realization of ordinary people growing up during the tumultuous Black Power era. Black Power Black Lawyer offers a uniquely personal glimpse from an insider's perspective into little known or understood parts of this country's history - from juicy stories of the more controversial and militant aspects of the Black liberation struggle, to the craziness of congressional "sausage-making" and the pivotal role of "strange bedfellows." Navigate this audacious quest with Taifa as she bears witness to ancestors, people and episodes that swayed the shaping of her identity and consciousness. No matter which vantage point she found herself - from sitting on the lap of that fine brother pulling security in the front office of the Black Panther Party; to getting arrested right after graduating from law school; to being accused of being an FBI agent; to representing the lead defendant in the Capitol Bombing case; to being detained at an airport five months pregnant as an alleged enemy of the state; to winning a six-figure settlement for clients in a pivotal employment discrimination suit against a major news media network; or to being a catalyst which sparked the change to the infamous crack cocaine laws -- her quest for justice in society reigned supreme. Taifa's memoir will awaken, inform, provoke, move and, at its best, fire you up to either join, or continue, "The Struggle!"

White Lawyer Black Power

In White Lawyer, Black Power, Jelinek recounts the battles he fought in defense of militant civil rights activists and rural African Americans, risking his career and his life to further the struggle for racial equality as an organizer for ...

White Lawyer  Black Power

Inspired by a colleague's involvement in the Mississippi Summer Project of 1964, Wall Street attorney Donald A. Jelinek traveled to the Deep South to volunteer as a civil rights lawyer during his three-week summer vacation in 1965. He stayed for three years. In White Lawyer, Black Power, Jelinek recounts the battles he fought in defense of militant civil rights activists and rural African Americans, risking his career and his life to further the struggle for racial equality as an organizer for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and an attorney for the Lawyers Constitutional Defense Committee of the American Civil Liberties Union. Jelinek arrived in the Deep South at a pivotal moment in the movement's history as frustration over the failure of the 1964 Civil Rights Act to improve the daily lives of southern blacks led increasing numbers of activists to question the doctrine of nonviolence. Jelinek offers a fresh perspective that emphasizes the complex dynamics and relationships that shaped the post-1965 black power era. Replete with sharply etched, complex portraits of the personalities Jelinek encountered, from the rank-and-file civil rights workers who formed the backbone of the movement to the younger, more radical, up-and-coming leaders like Stokely Carmichael and H. "Rap" Brown, White Lawyer, Black Power provides a powerful and sometimes harrowing firsthand account of one of the most significant struggles in American history. John Dittmer, professor emeritus of American history at DePauw University and author of Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi, provides a foreword.

Black power and lawyers

Black power and lawyers


The Black Panther Party reconsidered

Panther leadership also questioned whether the local Black attorneys possessed the political will to resist the political pressure from Oakland's White ...

The Black Panther Party  reconsidered

Featuring never-before-published essays by former Panther members and Panther scholars, a collection of articles examines the black revolutionaries' organizational dynamics, treatment of women, and controversial legacy. Tour. IP.

The Revolution Has Come

And they critiqued “Black lawyers, politicians, doctors, teachers and other professionals” who were engaged in a “mad scurry for white power, white values, ...

The Revolution Has Come

In The Revolution Has Come Robyn C. Spencer traces the Black Panther Party's organizational evolution in Oakland, California, where hundreds of young people came to political awareness and journeyed to adulthood as members. Challenging the belief that the Panthers were a projection of the leadership, Spencer draws on interviews with rank-and-file members, FBI files, and archival materials to examine the impact the organization's internal politics and COINTELPRO's political repression had on its evolution and dissolution. She shows how the Panthers' members interpreted, implemented, and influenced party ideology and programs; initiated dialogues about gender politics; highlighted ambiguities in the Panthers' armed stance; and criticized organizational priorities. Spencer also centers gender politics and the experiences of women and their contributions to the Panthers and the Black Power movement as a whole. Providing a panoramic view of the party's organization over its sixteen-year history, The Revolution Has Come shows how the Black Panthers embodied Black Power through the party's international activism, interracial alliances, commitment to address state violence, and desire to foster self-determination in Oakland's black communities.

William M Kunstler

Kunstler also defended Black Panthers for activities alleged to be more official. In 1971–72 he represented Arthur F. Turco, Jr., a white lawyer, ...

William M  Kunstler

Traces the life of the flamboyant lawyer who made a career of representing unpopular people and causes, including the Chicago Seven, and Leonard Peltier and the American Indian Movement.

Tragedy in Black and White

Dr. DuBois and Malcolm understood that whites must be coerced to do the right thing. That power—Black Power—gets the attention of whites.” White lawyer: ...

Tragedy in Black and White

What if race relations in the United States got so bad that the nation decided to try a radical idea: separation? The events that propel the country to such an extreme are riots, disturbances in the armed forces and on college campuses, and finally the assassination of a prominent black presidential candidate. In this book a nation-wide referendum approves the idea. Three states are set aside for blacks only, seven just for whites and the other 40 remain integrated. The story follows Mike, a white policeman, to all-white Miami; black college professor Ben and his family to all-black Chicago; and young militant Sherman also to Chicago. The brave new world that each was expecting proves elusive, for both external and internal reasons. This is a story about ambition, love, hate, violence, and betrayal. Marriages will be sorely tried, children will rebel against their parents, careers will take abrupt and surprising turns. All the manifestations of upheaval will be explored against a background of racial misunderstanding. Woven into the story is a study of the background of racial conflict dating back to slavery and segregation. Would such a solution to our racial troubles work?

In Search of the Black Panther Party

... history of the civil rights movement—sncc, now in its ''Black Power'' phase. ... the Panthers' alliance with the pfp; its choice of a white lawyer to ...

In Search of the Black Panther Party

Controversy swirled around the Black Panthers from the moment the revolutionary black nationalist Party was founded in Oakland, California, in 1966. Since that time, the group that J. Edgar Hoover called “the single greatest threat to the nation’s internal security” has been celebrated and denigrated, deified and vilified. Rarely, though, has it received the sort of nuanced analysis offered in this rich interdisciplinary collection. Historians, along with scholars in the fields of political science, English, sociology, and criminal justice, examine the Panthers and their present-day legacy with regard to revolutionary violence, radical ideology, urban politics, popular culture, and the media. The essays consider the Panthers as distinctly American revolutionaries, as the products of specific local conditions, and as parts of other movements of the late 1960s and early 1970s. One contributor evaluates the legal basis of the Panthers’ revolutionary struggle, explaining how they utilized and critiqued the language of the Constitution. Others explore the roles of individuals, looking at a one-time Panther imprisoned for a murder he did not commit and an FBI agent who monitored the activities of the Panthers’ Oakland branch. Contributors assess the Panthers’ relations with Students for a Democratic Society, the Young Lords, the Brown Berets, and the Peace and Freedom Party. They discuss the Party’s use of revolutionary aesthetics, and they show how the Panthers manipulated and were manipulated by the media. Illuminating some of the complexities involved in placing the Panthers in historical context, this collection demonstrates that the scholarly search for the Black Panthers has only just begun. Contributors. Bridgette Baldwin, Davarian L. Baldwin, David Barber, Rod Bush, James T. Campbell, Tim Lake, Jama Lazerow, Edward P. Morgan, Jeffrey O. G. Ogbar, Roz Payne, Robert O. Self, Yohuru Williams, Joel Wilson

White Money Black Power

The Surprising History of African American Studies and the Crisis of Race in ... her lawyers argued that the admissions program at 148 White Money / Black ...

White Money Black Power

The history of African American Studies is often told as a heroic tale, with compelling images of black power and passionate African American students who refuse to take “no” for an answer. Noliwe M. Rooks argues for the recognition of another story that proves that many of the programs that survived were actually begun due to heavy funding from the Ford Foundation or, put another way, as a result of white philanthropy. Today, many students in African American Studies courses are white, and an increasing number of black students come from Africa or the Caribbean, not the United States. This shift—which makes the survival of the discipline contingent on non–African American students—means that “blackness can mean everything and, at the same time, nothing at all.” While the Ford Foundation provided much-needed funding, its strategies, aimed at addressing America’s “race problem,” have left African American Studies struggling to define its identity in light of the changes it faces today. With unflinching honesty, Rooks shows that the only way to create a stable future for African American Studies is through confronting its complex past. “Rooks is a serious scholar and insider of African American Studies, and this book is full of deep insight and sharp analysis.” —Cornel West

Raymond Pace Alexander

The story of a nearly forgotten 1930s New Negro lawyer, whose contemporaries included Thurgood Marshall, Charles Hamilton Houston, and William Hastie

Raymond Pace Alexander

Raymond Pace Alexander (1897-1974) was a prominent black attorney in Philadelphia and a distinguished member of the National Bar Association, the oldest and largest association of African American lawyers and judges. A contemporary of such nationally known black attorneys as Charles Hamilton Houston, William Hastie, and Thurgood Marshall, Alexander litigated civil rights cases and became well known in Philadelphia. Yet his legacy to the civil rights struggle has received little national recognition. As a New Negro lawyer during the 1930s, Alexander worked with left-wing organizations to desegregate an all-white elementary school in Berwin, Pennsylvania. After World War II, he became an anti-communist liberal and formed coalitions with like-minded whites. In the sixties, Alexander criticized Black Power rhetoric, but shared some philosophies with Black Power such as black political empowerment and studying black history. By the late sixties, he focused on economic justice by advocating a Marshall Plan for poor Americans and supporting affirmative action. Alexander was a major contributor to the northern civil rights struggle and was committed to improving the status of black lawyers. He was representative of a generation who created opportunities for African Americans but was later often ignored or castigated by younger leaders who did not support the tactics of the old guard's pioneers.

Black Power Ideologies

Following this tradition , both black and white Americans see education as the ... for despite some notable efforts to comply with the law throughout the ...

Black Power Ideologies

In a systematic survey of the manifestations and meaning of Black Power in America, John McCartney analyzes the ideology of the Black Power Movement in the 1960s and places it in the context of both African-American and Western political thought. He demonstrates, though an exploration of historic antecedents, how the Black Power versus black mainstream competition of the sixties was not unique in American history. Tracing the evolution of black social and political movements from the 18th century to the present, the author focuses on the ideas and actions of the leaders of each major approach. Starting with the colonization efforts of the Pan-Negro Nationalist movement in the 18th century, McCartney contrasts the work of Bishop Turner with the opposing integrationist views of Frederick Douglass and his followers. McCartney examines the politics of accommodation espoused by Booker T. Washington; W.E.B. Du Bois's opposition to this apolitical stance; the formation of the NAACP, the Urban League, and other integrationist organizations; and Marcus Garvey's reawakening of the separatist ideal in the early 20th century. Focusing on the intense legal activity of the NAACP from the 1930s to the 1960s, McCartney gives extensive treatment to the moral and political leadership of Martin Luther King, Jr., and his challenge from the Black Power Movement in 1966.

Black Power

Whites going in booths with Negroes.” “Check Precinct 2. Black people from plantations being given marked ballots before they go in. Against the law.

Black Power

A revolutionary work since its publication, Black Power exposed the depths of systemic racism in this country and provided a radical political framework for reform: true and lasting social change would only be accomplished through unity among African-Americans and their independence from the preexisting order. An eloquent document of the civil rights movement that remains a work of profound social relevance 50 years after it was first published.

Redefining Black Power

Reflections on the State of Black America Joanne Griffith. coming home, so I go to court with him; I'm not a lawyer, but I do have a law degree from Yale ...

Redefining Black Power

Conversations with black leaders and activists exploring current African American political and cultural life.

Black Power white Power in Public Education

The Black man was a lawyer on his way to meet with the mayor; the youth belonged to a group of White high school students who had just met with City Council ...

Black Power white Power in Public Education

Examines the dynamics of power among racial groups in local community as they struggle with public education issues.

Black Against Empire

The SNCC leaders criticized the Panthers' politics of aligning with white leftists, including their decisions to hire a white lawyer and raise money from ...

Black Against Empire

This timely special edition, published on the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the Black Panther Party, features a new preface by the authors that places the Party in a contemporary political landscape, especially as it relates to Black Lives Matter and other struggles to fight police brutality against black communities. In Oakland, California, in 1966, community college students Bobby Seale and Huey Newton armed themselves, began patrolling the police, and promised to prevent police brutality. Unlike the Civil Rights Movement that called for full citizenship rights for blacks within the United States, the Black Panther Party rejected the legitimacy of the U.S. government and positioned itself as part of a global struggle against American imperialism. In the face of intense repression, the Party flourished, becoming the center of a revolutionary movement with offices in sixty-eight U.S. cities and powerful allies around the world. Black against Empire is the first comprehensive overview and analysis of the history and politics of the Black Panther Party. The authors analyze key political questions, such as why so many young black people across the country risked their lives for the revolution, why the Party grew most rapidly during the height of repression, and why allies abandoned the Party at its peak of influence. Bold, engrossing, and richly detailed, this book cuts through the mythology and obfuscation, revealing the political dynamics that drove the explosive growth of this revolutionary movement and its disastrous unraveling. Informed by twelve years of meticulous archival research, as well as familiarity with most of the former Party leadership and many rank-and-file members, this book is the definitive history of one of the greatest challenges ever posed to American state power.

White World Order Black Power Politics

By way of a necessary if not sufficient step toward securing effective rule over the new dependencies, Harvard professor of government Albert Law- rence ...

White World Order  Black Power Politics

Racism and imperialism are the twin forces that propelled the course of the United States in the world in the early twentieth century and in turn affected the way that diplomatic history and international relations were taught and understood in the American academy. Evolutionary theory, social Darwinism, and racial anthropology had been dominant doctrines in international relations from its beginnings; racist attitudes informed research priorities and were embedded in newly formed professional organizations. In White World Order, Black Power Politics, Robert Vitalis recovers the arguments, texts, and institution building of an extraordinary group of professors at Howard University, including Alain Locke, Ralph Bunche, Rayford Logan, Eric Williams, and Merze Tate, who was the first black female professor of political science in the country. Within the rigidly segregated profession, the "Howard School of International Relations" represented the most important center of opposition to racism and the focal point for theorizing feasible alternatives to dependency and domination for Africans and African Americans through the early 1960s. Vitalis pairs the contributions of white and black scholars to reconstitute forgotten historical dialogues and show the critical role played by race in the formation of international relations.