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The White Working Class

Author: Justin Gest
Publisher: Oxford University Press
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Powered by original field research and survey analysis in the United States and United Kingdom, The White Working Class: What Everyone Needs to Know(R) provides a comprehensive and accessible exploration of white working-class politics and the populism that is transforming the transatlantic social and political landscape. In recent years, the world has been reintroduced to the constituency of "white working-class" people. In a wave of revolutionary populism, far right parties have scored victories across the transatlantic political world: Britain voted to leave the European Union, the United States elected President Donald Trump to enact an "America First" agenda, and Radical Right movements are threatening European centrists in elections across the continent. In each case, white working-class people are driving the reaction to the social change brought by globalization. In the midst of this rebellion, a new group consciousness has emerged among the very people who not so long ago could take their political, economic, and cultural primacy for granted. In The White Working Class: What Everyone Needs to Know(R), Justin Gest provides the context for understanding this large group of people. He begins by explaining what "white working class" means in terms of demographics, history, and geography, as well as the ways in which this group defines itself and has been defined by others. Gest also addresses whether white identity is on the rise, why white people perceive themselves as marginalized, and the roles of racism and xenophobia in white consciousness. Finally, he looks at the political attitudes, voting behavior, and prospects for the future of the white working class. This accessible book provides a nuanced view into the forces driving one of the most complicated and consequential political constituencies today.


The New Minority

Author: Justin Gest
Publisher: Oxford University Press
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It wasn't so long ago that the white working class occupied the middle of British and American societies. But today members of the same demographic, feeling silenced and ignored by mainstream parties, have moved to the political margins. In the United States and the United Kingdom, economic disenfranchisement, nativist sentiments and fear of the unknown among this group have even inspired the creation of new right-wing parties and resulted in a remarkable level of support for fringe political candidates, most notably Donald Trump. Answers to the question of how to rebuild centrist coalitions in both the U.S. and U.K. have become increasingly elusive. How did a group of people synonymous with Middle Britain and Middle America drift to the ends of the political spectrum? What drives their emerging radicalism? And what could possibly lead a group with such enduring numerical power to, in many instances, consider themselves a "minority" in the countries they once defined? In The New Minority, Justin Gest speaks to people living in once thriving working class cities--Youngstown, Ohio and Dagenham, England--to arrive at a nuanced understanding of their political attitudes and behaviors. In this daring and compelling book, he makes the case that tension between the vestiges of white working class power and its perceived loss have produced the unique phenomenon of white working class radicalization.


White Working Class

Author: Joan C. Williams
Publisher: Harvard Business Press
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Around the world, populist movements are gaining traction among the white working class. Meanwhile, members of the professional elite—journalists, managers, and establishment politicians—are on the outside looking in, left to argue over the reasons. In White Working Class, Joan C. Williams, described as having “something approaching rock star status” by the New York Times, explains why so much of the elite’s analysis of the white working class is misguided, rooted in class cluelessness. Williams explains that many people have conflated “working class” with “poor”—but the working class is, in fact, the elusive, purportedly disappearing middle class. They often resent the poor and the professionals alike. But they don’t resent the truly rich, nor are they particularly bothered by income inequality. Their dream is not to join the upper middle class, with its different culture, but to stay true to their own values in their own communities—just with more money. While white working-class motivations are often dismissed as racist or xenophobic, Williams shows that they have their own class consciousness. White Working Class is a blunt, bracing narrative that sketches a nuanced portrait of millions of people who have proven to be a potent political force. For anyone stunned by the rise of populist, nationalist movements, wondering why so many would seemingly vote against their own economic interests, or simply feeling like a stranger in their own country, White Working Class will be a convincing primer on how to connect with a crucial set of workers—and voters.


White Working class Voices

Author: Harris Beider
Publisher: Policy Press
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This important book provides the first substantial analysis of white working class perspectives on multiculturalism and change in the UK, improving our understanding of this under-researched group and suggesting a new and progressive agenda for white working class communities.


Redundant Masculinities

Author: Linda McDowell
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
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Redundant Masculinities? investigates the links between the so-called 'crisis of masculinity' and contemporary changes in the labour market through the lives of young working class men. Allows the voices of poorly-educated young men to be heard. Looks at how the labour market is changing. Emphasises the social construction of gender and racial identities. Dispels popular myths about the crisis in masculinity.


The Likes Of Us

Author: Michael Collins
Publisher: Granta Books
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Once they were portrayed as the salt of the earth. Nowadays, they take to the streets when paedophiles and asylum seekers are in their midst; they expose their lives in TV documentaries; they love Gucci and hate the Euro; the broadsheets cast them as xenophobes and exhibitionists and mock their tastes and attitudes. But who are the white working class and what have they done to deserve this portrayal? The Likes of Us is a fascinating and wholly original examination of London's white working class.


A Feminist Critique of Education

Author: Christine Skelton
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
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Compiled by the current editors of the journal, 'Gender & Education', this new book maps the development of thinking in gender and education over the last 15 years, featuring groundbreaking articles from leading authors in the field.


Understanding Inequality

Author: Barbara A. Arrighi
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
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As the age of globalization and New Media unite disparate groups of people in new ways, the continual transformation and interconnections between ethnicity, class, and gender become increasingly complex. This reader, comprised of a diverse array of sources ranging from the New York Times to the journals of leading research universities, explores these issues as systems of stratification that work to reinforce one another. Understanding Inequality provides students and academics with the basic hermeneutics for considering new thought on ethnicity, class, and gender in the 21st century.


Class Construction

Author: Carrie Freie
Publisher: Lexington Books
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Class Construction: White Working-Class Student Identity in the New Millennium explores the identity development of a group of white working-class high school students in a de-industrialized area of the Northeast. This ethnographic study explores class, racial and gender identity construction, and focuses on the ways the students' perceptions of their current and future classed, raced, and gendered selves are negotiated within the context of the school structure.


Looking at the U S White Working Class Historically

Author: David Gilbert
Publisher: Kersplebedeb
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Looking at the U.S. White Working Class Historically tackles one of the supreme issues for our movement, the contradiction embodied in the term "white working class." On the one hand there is the class designation that should imply, along with all other workers of the world, a fundamental role in the overthrow of capitalism. On the other hand, there is the identification of being part of a ("white") oppressor nation. Gilbert seeks to understand the origins of this contradiction, its historical development, as well as possibilities to weaken and ultimately transform the situation. In other words, how can people organize a break with white supremacy and foster solidarity with the struggles of people of color, both within the United States and around the world? Gilbert began this project in the early 1980s, while in jail facing charges stemming from his activities in the revolutionary underground. It started as a pamphlet reflecting on writings about race and class by Ted Allen, W.E.B. DuBois, and J. Sakai. In the 1990s, Gilbert added a retrospective essay, reviewing lessons from the 1960s and the New Left he had been active in at the time. Over the years, Looking at the White Working Class Historically (as it was known in previous editions) has been widely circulated across multiple waves and generations of activists. As Gilbert writes in the introduction to this 2017 edition, this text remains the most popular of his writings for younger radicals seeking to build movements against racism. This new edition contains all the material from previous versions (including an essay by J. Sakai), along with a new introduction, Gilbert's take on the election of Donald Trump, and an extensive new text surveying changes in the global political order since the 1960s. More than ever, Looking at the U.S. White Working Class Historically explores and illuminates perspectives for radical change and resistance to racism in the United States today.


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