Who Owns Antiquity

The first extended defense of the side of museums in the struggle over antiquities, Who Owns Antiquity? is sure to be as important as it is controversial. Some images inside the book are unavailable due to digital copyright restrictions.

Who Owns Antiquity

Whether antiquities should be returned to the countries where they were found is one of the most urgent and controversial issues in the art world today, and it has pitted museums, private collectors, and dealers against source countries, archaeologists, and academics. Maintaining that the acquisition of undocumented antiquities by museums encourages the looting of archaeological sites, countries such as Italy, Greece, Egypt, Turkey, and China have claimed ancient artifacts as state property, called for their return from museums around the world, and passed laws against their future export. But in Who Owns Antiquity?, one of the world's leading museum directors vigorously challenges this nationalistic position, arguing that it is damaging and often disingenuous. "Antiquities," James Cuno argues, "are the cultural property of all humankind," "evidence of the world's ancient past and not that of a particular modern nation. They comprise antiquity, and antiquity knows no borders." Cuno argues that nationalistic retention and reclamation policies impede common access to this common heritage and encourage a dubious and dangerous politicization of antiquities--and of culture itself. Antiquities need to be protected from looting but also from nationalistic identity politics. To do this, Cuno calls for measures to broaden rather than restrict international access to antiquities. He advocates restoration of the system under which source countries would share newly discovered artifacts in exchange for archaeological help, and he argues that museums should again be allowed reasonable ways to acquire undocumented antiquities. Cuno explains how partage broadened access to our ancient heritage and helped create national museums in Cairo, Baghdad, and Kabul. The first extended defense of the side of museums in the struggle over antiquities, Who Owns Antiquity? is sure to be as important as it is controversial. Some images inside the book are unavailable due to digital copyright restrictions.

About Antiquities

Cuno, Who Owns Antiquity?, xxxiv; Rhodes, “Introduction” in Rhodes, The Acquisition and Exhibition of Classical ... Their target is not only the legislation against the exportation of antiquities but also the archaeologists who insist ...

About Antiquities

Antiquities have been pawns in empire-building and global rivalries; power struggles; assertions of national and cultural identities; and cross-cultural exchanges, cooperation, abuses, and misunderstandings—all with the underlying element of financial gain. Indeed, “who owns antiquity?” is a contentious question in many of today’s international conflicts. About Antiquities offers an interdisciplinary study of the relationship between archaeology and empire-building around the turn of the twentieth century. Starting at Istanbul and focusing on antiquities from the Ottoman territories, Zeynep Çelik examines the popular discourse surrounding claims to the past in London, Paris, Berlin, and New York. She compares and contrasts the experiences of two museums—Istanbul’s Imperial Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art—that aspired to emulate European collections and gain the prestige and power of owning the material fragments of ancient history. Going beyond institutions, Çelik also unravels the complicated interactions among individuals—Westerners, Ottoman decision makers and officials, and local laborers—and their competing stakes in antiquities from such legendary sites as Ephesus, Pergamon, and Babylon. Recovering perspectives that have been lost in histories of archaeology, particularly those of the excavation laborers whose voices have never been heard, About Antiquities provides important historical context for current controversies surrounding nation-building and the ownership of the past.

Antiquities

There is no reason that a sovereign nation would voluntarily cede ownership of goods that are not only valuable, but conventionally ... the cosmopolitan argument offers no plausible prescription for what ails the field of antiquities.

Antiquities

The destruction of ancient monuments and artworks by the Taliban in Afghanistan and the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria has shocked observers worldwide. Yet iconoclastic erasures of the past date back at least to the mid-1300s BCE, during the Amarna Period of ancient Egypt's 18th dynasty. Far more damage to the past has been inflicted by natural disasters, looters, and public works. Art historian Maxwell Anderson's Antiquities: What Everyone Needs to Know® analyzes continuing threats to our heritage, and offers a balanced account of treaties and laws governing the circulation of objects; the history of collecting antiquities; how forgeries are made and detected; how authentic works are documented, stored, dispersed, and displayed; the politics of sending antiquities back to their countries of origin; and the outlook for an expanded legal market. Anderson provides a summary of challenges ahead, including the future of underwater archaeology, the use of drones, remote sensing, and how invisible markings on antiquities will allow them to be traced. Written in question-and-answer format, the book equips readers with a nuanced understanding of the legal, practical, and moral choices that face us all when confronting antiquities in a museum gallery, shop window, or for sale on the Internet.

Antiquities

Who Owns Antiquity? ... “Who Should Own the World's Antiquities?” The New York Review of Books. May 14, 2009. Accessed April 28, 2016. http://www.nybooks.com/articles/2009/05/14/who-should-ownthe-worlds-antiquities/.

Antiquities

The destruction of ancient monuments and artworks by the Taliban in Afghanistan and the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria has shocked observers worldwide. Yet iconoclastic erasures of the past date back at least to the mid-1300s BCE, during the Amarna Period of ancient Egypt's 18th dynasty. Far more damage to the past has been inflicted by natural disasters, looters, and public works. Art historian Maxwell Anderson's Antiquities: What Everyone Needs to Know(r) analyzes continuing threats to our heritage, and offers a balanced account of treaties and laws governing the circulation of objects; the history of collecting antiquities; how forgeries are made and detected; how authentic works are documented, stored, dispersed, and displayed; the politics of sending antiquities back to their countries of origin; and the outlook for an expanded legal market. Anderson provides a summary of challenges ahead, including the future of underwater archaeology, the use of drones, remote sensing, and how invisible markings on antiquities will allow them to be traced. Written in question-and-answer format, the book equips readers with a nuanced understanding of the legal, practical, and moral choices that face us all when confronting antiquities in a museum gallery, shop window, or for sale on the Internet.

Keeping Their Marbles

Quoted in James Cuno , Who Owns Antiquity ? Museums and the Battle Over Our Ancient ... The Promise of Museums and the Debate Over Antiquities ( Princeton : Princeton University Press , 2009 ) , 74 . 16. Karl Marx , “ The Grundrisse ' ...

Keeping Their Marbles

The story of how the museums of the West acquired their fabulous collections, from the Benin Bronzes to Native American sacred objects, and why they should not by returned to the lands -- or the people -- from which they came.

Antiquity s Covered Bridge

ANTIQUITY'S COVERED BRIDGE Dorine Emery is an avid photographer of covered bridges . ... Not without humor — it is Nevermore who owns Antiquity's bridge , nor without tragedy — that of Janie's sorrow over her dear Andrew and their baby ...

Antiquity s Covered Bridge

Antiquity's Covered Bridge By: Dorine Emery Dorine Emery is an avid photographer of covered bridges. She began in her local area in New Jersey but knew the LC Beavens bridge in New Milford, Pennsylvania, was a must-see. It was Emery’s fascination with the mountain that rises to the east of Mylert Creek and the bridge she knew was there that led her to Antiquity’s Covered Bridge. History and imagination are woven like the ivy vines on a latticed bridge, facts and fiction which Emery has found on and around the Nevermore area of New Milford. Fiction based on facts, then enhanced by pseudo possibilities might describe mystery within. Not without humor—it is Nevermore who owns Antiquity’s bridge, nor without tragedy—that of Janie’s sorrow over her dear Andrew and their baby, Cheri, Antiquity’s Covered Bridge is a story to be pondered at a moderate pace.

Contemporary Archaeology in Theory

Brown, Michael F., 2003 Who Owns Native Culture? Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. Carman, John, 2005 Against Cultural Property: Archaeology, Heritage and Ownership. London: Duckworth. ... Cuno, James, 2008 Who Owns Antiquity?

Contemporary Archaeology in Theory

"Contemporary Archaeology in Theory: The New Pragmatism is a great collection of texts to teach from, but it is much more than that. Preucel and Mrozowski have put together a landmark volume that combines a diversity of exciting contributions with a common intellectual agenda and purpose. One comes away from reading The New Pragmatism with a sense of a serious, mature discipline that combines academic rigour with social engagement." Matthew Johnson, University of Southampton "Far more than a second edition, this is a fully transformed, cutting-edge, thorough, truly monumental book that captures the richness of archaeological theory today for introductory and advanced readers alike." Stephen Silliman, University of Massachusetts, Boston "The new pragmatism advanced by the editors places archaeology within its social context, importantly in ways that can serve contemporary needs in the modern world. Archaeology is no longer innocent." Peter Bellwood, Australian National University "This collection of papers works beautifully as an overview of contemporary archaeological theory. It's framing as `The New Pragmatism' is quite appropriate given the discipline's challenge to better address current social contexts and human needs." Dean Saitta, University of Denver This completely revised second edition of Contemporary Archaeology in Theory challenges the traditional boundaries between prehistoric and historical archaeologies, as well as those between time, space, things, and people. Essays by a distinguished group of archaeologists outline the emergence of a socially conscious archaeology by addressing the material mediation of contemporary social problems such as colonialism, industrialism, racialization, and globalization. Contemporary Archaeology in Theory: The New Pragmatism investigates the gradual incorporation of questions of identity, meaning, agency, and practice alongside those of system, process, and structure. This new edition is an essential reader for students and a thought-provoking assessment of the field for all archaeologists, indigenous peoples, and the concerned lay public.

Tracking and Disrupting the Illicit Antiquities Trade with Open Source Data

Similar efforts to regulate the excavation and trade of antiquities were established in neighboring Syria, ... and ownership of artifacts discovered during this period was frequently split between the newly formed Museum at Aleppo and ...

Tracking and Disrupting the Illicit Antiquities Trade with Open Source Data

The sale of illicit goods provides an important funding source for terrorist organizations, organized crime, and rogue states. The authors of this report use open-source data to examine these networks and guide future policy to disrupt the trade.

From Antiquities to Heritage

Who Owns Antiquity? Museums and the Battle over Our Ancient Heritage. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. Daae, L. 1880. Gerhard Schøning. En biographi. Christiania: A.W. Brøgger. Dahl, J.C. 1837. Denkmale einer sehrausgebildeten ...

From Antiquities to Heritage

Eighteenth-century gentleman scholars collected antiquities. Nineteenth-century nation states built museums to preserve their historical monuments. In the present world, heritage is a global concern as well as an issue of identity politics. What does it mean when runic stones or medieval churches are transformed from antiquities to monuments to heritage sites? This book argues that the transformations concern more than words alone: They reflect fundamental changes in the way we experience the past, and the way historical objects are assigned meaning and value in the present. This book presents a series of cases from Norwegian culture to explore how historical objects and sites have changed in meaning over time. It contributes to the contemporary debates over collective memory and cultural heritage as well to our knowledge about early modern antiquarianism.

Law Ethics and the Visual Arts

Dr. Gaballa clarified that people who owned antiquities prior to the adoption of Law 117 in 1983 are permitted to continue to possess the antiquities, but they may not transfer, dispose of, or relocate the antiquities without notifying ...

Law  Ethics  and the Visual Arts

This book describes the collisions between the art world and the law, with a critical eye through a combination of primary source materials, excerpts from professional and art journals, and extensive textual notes. Topics analysed include + the fate of works of art in wartime, + the international trade in stolen and illegally exported cultural property, + artistic freedom, + censorship and state support for art and artists, + copyright, + droit moral and droit de suite, + the artist's professional life and death, + collectors in the art market, + income and estate taxation, + charitable donations and works of art, and + art museums and their collections. The authors are recognised experts in the field who have defined the canon in many aspects of art law.

Art Law

antiquity faces a prison term of three to twelve months and/or a fine of 100 to 500 pounds. ... Dr. Gaballa clarified that people who owned antiquities prior to the adoption of Law 117 in 1983 are permitted to continue to possess the ...

Art Law

Art Law: Cases and Materials, Second Edition offers a timely and panoramic view of the entire field of law. Designed as a primary text for courses on Law and the Visual Arts, Cultural Property Law, or Cultural Heritage Law, the three-part framework of this highly readable casebook explores Artists’ Rights, Art Markets, and the International Preservation of Art and Cultural Property.

Crime in the Art and Antiquities World

Who Owns Antiquity. Museums and the Battle over Our Ancient Heritage. Princeton: Princeton University Press. Davis, A. (2010). Italy repatriates EU15 million of antiquities from Switzerland. Bloomberg.

Crime in the Art and Antiquities World

The theft, trafficking, and falsification of cultural property and cultural heritage objects are crimes of a particularly complex nature, which often have international ramifications and significant economic consequences. Organized criminal groups of various types and origins are involved in these illegal acts. The book Crime in the Art and Antiquities World has contributions both from researchers specializing in the illegal trafficking of art, and representatives of international institutions involved with prevention and detection of cultural property-related crimes, such as Interpol and UNESCO. This work is a unique and useful reference for scholars and private and public bodies alike. This innovative volume also includes an Appendix of the existing legal texts, i.e. international treaties, conventions, and resolutions, which have not previously been available in a single volume. As anyone who has undertaken research or study relating to the protection of cultural heritage discovers one of the frustrations encountered is the absence of ready access to the multi- various international instruments which exist in the field. Since the end of the Second World War these instruments have proliferated, first in response to increasing recognition of the need for concerted multinational action to give better protection to cultural property during armed conflict as well as ensuring the repatriation of cultural property looted during such conflict. Thus the international community agreed in 1954 upon a Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict. That Convention, typically referred to as the Hague Convention of 1954, is now to be found reproduced in the Appendix to this book (Appendix I) together with 25 other important and diverse documents that we believe represent a core of the essential international sources of reference in this subject area. In presenting these documents in one place we hope that readers will now experience less frustration while having the benefit of supplementing their understanding and interpretation of the various instruments by referring to individual chapters in the book dealing with a particular issue or topic. For example, Chapter 9 by Mathew Bogdanos provides some specific and at times rather depressing descriptions of the application in the field of the Hague Convention 1954, and its Protocols (Appendices II and III), to the armed conflict in Iraq. Reference may also be had to the resolution of the UN Security Council in May 2003 (Appendix VI) urging Member States to take appropriate steps to facilitate the safe return of looted Iraqi cultural property taken from the Iraq National Museum, the National Library and other locations in Iraq. Despite such pleas the international antiquities market seems to have continued to trade such looted property in a largely unfettered manner, as demonstrated by Neil Brodie in Chapter 7. Fittingly, as referred to in the Preface to this book, the last document contained in the Appendix (Appendix 26) is the “Charter of Courmayeur”, formulated at a ground breaking international workshop on the protection of cultural property conducted by the International Scientific and Professional Advisory Council (ISPAC) to the United Nations Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice Program in Courmayeur, Italy, in June 1992. The Charter makes mention of many of the instruments contained in the Appendix while also foreshadowing many of the developments which have taken place in the ensuing two decades designed to combat illicit trafficking in cultural property through international collaboration and action in the arena of crime prevention and criminal justice.

Sinologism

29 James Cuno, Who Owns Antiquity? Museums and The Battle over Our Ancient Heritages, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2008, p. xvii. 30 Ibid., p. xvii. 31 Yun Kuen Lee, “Building the Chronology of Early Chinese History,” pp.

Sinologism

This book is a study of knowledge production about China and the Chinese civilization and as such it is a critique of the ways in which knowledge about the Chinese civilization is produced. It is not primarily intended as one that sets out to expose biases and prejudices against China, correct errors and misrepresentations of Chinese civilization, and dispute misperceptions and misinterpretations of Chinese materials, although all these issues do occur in the book. The overall objective is to get behind and beneath all these problems in order to uncover the motivations, mental frameworks, attitudes, and reasons for the abovementioned phenomena, which the author terms Sinologism.

Property

Article 8 With the exception of antiquities whose ownership or possession was already established [in 1983] or is established pursuant to [this law's] provisions, the possession of antiquities shall be prohibited as from [1983].

Property

Property: Cases and Materials features sweeping coverage in a single volume, from “old property” (such as the basics of estates in land and servitudes) to “new property,” including intellectual property, cultural property, and property in living things. The text provokes debate on fundamental questions such as the creation of property, information as property, collective vs. individual rights, and property as related to other bodies of law. Its coverage of intellectual property shows how the law grows and responds to social and technological change. Designed for flexibility, stand-alone chapters can be omitted if time constraints require. Property: Cases and Materials includes appellate decisions, statutes, regulations, administrative decisions, law review articles, and non-legal materials. Principal cases include Elvis Presley International Memorial Foundation v. Crowell, Popov v. Hayashi (Barry Bonds home run ball); People v. Chubbs (software for DNA matching), and Dred Scott v. Sandford. Key Features: Updated with more recent cases, including more cases from the twenty-first century than any other major property casebook. Improved coverage of natural resources law and intellectual property. Thorough update of all existing materials.

Whose Culture

The Promise of Museums and the Debate over Antiquities James Cuno. ———. “Illicit Traffic of Pre-Columbian ... “Art Museums, Archaeology, and Antiquities in an Age of Sectarian Violence and Nationalist Politics. ... Who Owns Antiquity?

Whose Culture

The international controversy over who "owns" antiquities has pitted museums against archaeologists and source countries where ancient artifacts are found. In his book Who Owns Antiquity?, James Cuno argued that antiquities are the cultural property of humankind, not of the countries that lay exclusive claim to them. Now in Whose Culture?, Cuno assembles preeminent museum directors, curators, and scholars to explain for themselves what's at stake in this struggle--and why the museums' critics couldn't be more wrong. Source countries and archaeologists favor tough cultural property laws restricting the export of antiquities, have fought for the return of artifacts from museums worldwide, and claim the acquisition of undocumented antiquities encourages looting of archaeological sites. In Whose Culture?, leading figures from universities and museums in the United States and Britain argue that modern nation-states have at best a dubious connection with the ancient cultures they claim to represent, and that archaeology has been misused by nationalistic identity politics. They explain why exhibition is essential to responsible acquisitions, why our shared art heritage trumps nationalist agendas, why restrictive cultural property laws put antiquities at risk from unstable governments--and more. Defending the principles of art as the legacy of all humankind and museums as instruments of inquiry and tolerance, Whose Culture? brings reasoned argument to an issue that for too long has been distorted by politics and emotionalism. In addition to the editor, the contributors are Kwame Anthony Appiah, Sir John Boardman, Michael F. Brown, Derek Gillman, Neil MacGregor, John Henry Merryman, Philippe de Montebello, David I. Owen, and James C. Y. Watt.

Antiquities in Motion

See also the debate raised in James Cuno, Who Owns Antiquity? Museums and the Battle over Our Ancient Heritage (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2008). On theoretical and historical problems related to looted artworks, ...

Antiquities in Motion

An exciting new approach to understand the trade of antiquities in early modern Rome traces the journey of objects from discovery to display. Barbara Furlotti presents a dynamic interpretation of the early modern market for antiquities, relying on the innovative notion of archaeological finds as mobile items. She reconstructs the journey of ancient objects from digging sites to venues where they were sold, such as Roman marketplaces and antiquarians’ storage spaces; to sculptors’ workshops, where they were restored; and to Italian and other European collections, where they arrived after complicated and costly travel over land and sea. She shifts the attention away from collectors to peasants with shovels, dealers and middlemen, and restorers who unearthed, cleaned up, and repaired or remade objects, recuperating the role these actors played in Rome’s socioeconomic structure. Furlotti also examines the changes in economic value, meaning, and appearance that antiquities underwent as they moved trhoughout their journeys and as they reached the locations in which they were displayed. Drawing on vast unpublished archival material, she offers answers to novel questions: How were antiquities excavated? How and where were they traded? How were laws about the ownership of ancient finds made, followed, and evaded?

Museums Matter

An argument in support of the relevance of museums challenges recent criticisms that they promote imperialism, tracing the evolution of the modern museum as well as posing a case for the encyclopedic museum as a cosmopolitan institution ...

Museums Matter

An argument in support of the relevance of museums challenges recent criticisms that they promote imperialism, tracing the evolution of the modern museum as well as posing a case for the encyclopedic museum as a cosmopolitan institution that promotes tolerance, cultural diversity and an understanding of shared history.

Collecting and Provenance

Who, then, owns antiquity?14 I have tried to present the many complex issues related to the Middle East antiquities market, in which looting and robbery go hand in hand with trading and selling antiquities. These phenomena have taken ...

Collecting and Provenance

This collection of essays highlights the enduring significance of provenance and its implications for historians and art historians, as well as students and researchers engaged in museum studies. It also offers an opportunity to demonstrate its relevance to other fields of expertise, such as conservation, visual culture studies, aesthetics, authentication and connoisseurship versus technology as a means of establishing attributions and detecting forgeries. Provenance is still of vital importance to jurisdiction, whether it concerns property law or ownership. It also remains topical because of the ongoing debates over looted art in the 1930s and 1940s and the illicit trade in antiquities conducted from Iraq and Syria by terrorist groups.

Crimes of the Art World

Who Owns Antiquity?: Museums and the Battle Over Our Ancient Heritage. ... “Getty Ex-Curator Says Antiquities Trade 'Corrupt,' Art Smuggled.” Bloomberg, November 10 (accessed through Museum Security Network, ...

Crimes of the Art World

This book offers a revealing look at the full scope of criminal activity in the art world-a category of crime that is far more pervasive than is generally realized. * Comprises 10 chapters covering the various types of crimes common in the art world, from forgeries to theft to vandalism * Includes case studies throughout to explore the characteristics of art crime * Provides a bibliography of important books on the subject of art crime * An index of important words and terms emphasizes works of art and artists covered in the book, along with terms unique to art and art crime

Mummy Portraits of Roman Egypt

János György Szilágyi, keeper of the Collection of Classical Antiquities at the Museum of Fine Arts then and for the next three decades,36 made ... The question naturally echoes the title of James B. Cuno's monograph Who Owns Antiquity?

Mummy Portraits of Roman Egypt

This publication presents fascinating new findings on ancient Romano-Egyptian funerary portraits preserved in international collections. Once interred with mummified remains, nearly a thousand funerary portraits from Roman Egypt survive today in museums around the world, bringing viewers face-to-face with people who lived two thousand years ago. Until recently, few of these paintings had undergone in-depth study to determine by whom they were made and how. An international collaboration known as APPEAR (Ancient Panel Paintings: Examination, Analysis, and Research) was launched in 2013 to promote the study of these objects and to gather scientific and historical findings into a shared database. The first phase of the project was marked with a two-day conference at the Getty Villa. Conservators, scientists, and curators presented new research on topics such as provenance and collecting, comparisons of works across institutions, and scientific studies of pigments, binders, and supports. The papers and posters from the conference are collected in this publication, which offers the most up-to-date information available about these fascinating remnants of the ancient world.