Who Was Charles Dickens?

Who Was Charles Dickens?

As a child, Charles Dickens worked in a shoe polish factory where his gritty surroundings inspired some of the most memorable characters and settings in literary history. Known for his masterful storytelling in books like Oliver Twist, Great Expectations, and A Christmas Carol, Dickens toured the globe as one of the most famous people of his era. Widely considered the greatest writer of the Victorian age, Dickens’s literary masterpieces continue to amuse and inspire writers and readers alike.

The Mystery of Charles Dickens

The Mystery of Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens was a superb public performer, a great orator and one of the most famous of the Eminent Victorians. Slight of build, with a frenzied, hyper-energetic personality, Dickens looked much older than his fifty-eight years when he died. Although he specified an unpretentious funeral, it was inevitable that crowds flocked to his open grave in Westminster Abbey. Experiencing the worst and best of life during the Victorian Age, Dickens was not merely the conduit through whom some of the most beloved characters in literature came into the world. He was one of them. Filled with twists, pathos and unusual characters, The Mystery of Charles Dickens looks back from the legendary writer's death to recall the key events in his life. In doing so, A. N. Wilson seeks to understand Dickens's creative genius and enduring popularity. Following him from cradle to grave, it becomes clear that Dickens's fiction drew from his own experiences - a fact he acknowledged. Like Oliver Twist, Dickens suffered a wretched childhood, then grew up to become not only a respectable gentleman but an artist of prodigious popularity. Dickens knew firsthand the poverty and pain his characters endured, including the scandal of a failed marriage. Going beyond standard narrative biography, Wilson brilliantly revisits the wellspring of Dickens's vast and wild imagination, revealing why his novels have such instantaneous appeal and why they continue to resonate today. He also uncovers the double standards of both the man and his times.

Oliver Twist

The Parish Boy's Progress - With Appreciations and Criticisms By G. K. Chesterton

Oliver Twist

Charles Dickens's second novel, “Oliver Twist” was first published as a serial from 1837 to 1839 and centres around the story of orphan Oliver Twist, who was born in a workhouse and sold as an apprentice to an undertaker. When he manages to escape, Oliver travels to London where he encounters the “Artful Dodger” and his gang of pickpockets. A gritty representation of the London underworld, “Oliver” famously exposed the hardships of the poor, especially the terrible treatment of orphans in the mid-19th century. Charles John Huffam Dickens (1812–1870) was an English writer and social critic famous for having created some of the world's most well-known fictional characters. His works became unprecedentedly popular during his life, and today he is commonly regarded as the greatest Victorian-era novelist. Although perhaps better known for such works as “Great Expectations” or “A Christmas Carol”, Dickens first gained success with the 1836 serial publication of “The Pickwick Papers”, which turned him almost overnight into an international literary celebrity thanks to his humour, satire, and astute observations concerning society and character. This classic work is being republished now in a new edition complete with an introductory chapter from “Appreciations and Criticisms of the Works of Charles Dickens” by G. K. Chesterton.

The Lamplighter

The Lamplighter

Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world's best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

Three Ghost Stories

Three Ghost Stories

Though best known for his heartwarming holiday tales and sweeping social novels such as A Tale of Two Cities and Great Expectations, Charles Dickens was a prolific writer who was always willing to experiment with new styles. The chilling tales collected in Three Ghost Stories are a result of his brief but successful foray into the mystery and detective genres.

Charles Dickens

The Essential Collection

Charles Dickens

This superb collection of classic Victorian literature features the most notable works of Charles Dickens, including Oliver Twist (1839), A Christmas Carol (1843), A Tale of Two Cities (1859), and Great Expectations (1861). Considered the greatest novelist of the Victorian era, Dickens was especially known for his unusual characters, incisive social commentary, and carefully constructed plots. Over the last two centuries, his popular fiction has continued to inspire adaptations in nearly artistic genre, and now it is available--complete and unabridged--in this gorgeous slipcase edition. The stylish clothbound hardcover also features a ribbon marker, historical timeline, and comprehensive introduction, enlightening the reader on the author’s life and works.

The Complete Works of Charles Dickens

The Complete Works of Charles Dickens

It is impossible to overstate the importance of British novelist CHARLES DICKENS (1812-1870) not only to literature in the English language, but to Western civilization on the whole. He is arguably the first fiction writer to have become an international celebrity. He popularized episodic fiction and the cliffhanger, which had a profound influence on the development of film and television. He is entirely responsible for the popular image of Victorian London that still lingers today, and his characters-from Oliver Twist to Ebenezer Scrooge, from Miss Havisham to Uriah Heep-have become not merely iconic, but mythic. But it was his stirring portraits of ordinary people-not the upper classes or the aristocracy-and his fervent cries for social, moral, and legal justice for the working poor, and in particular for poor children, in the grim early decades of the Industrial Revolution that powerfully impacted social concerns well into the 20th century. Without Charles Dickens, we may never have seen the likes of Sherlock Holmes, Upton Sinclair, or even Bob Dylan. Here, in 30 beautiful volumes-complete with all the original illustrations-is every published word written by one of the most important writers ever. The essential collector's set will delight anyone who cherishes English literature...and who takes pleasure in constantly rediscovering its joys. This volume contains Part I of David Copperfield, which was originally serialized in standalone installments in 1849. Dickens drew on his own life story for this tale of the life of the title character, and it is considered the most autobiographical of his works. It was Dickens's own favorite, and the work considered the best by many literary observers, including Tolstoy.

Charles Dickens' Book of Memoranda

A Photographic and Typographic Facsimile of the Notebook Begun in January 1855

Charles Dickens' Book of Memoranda


The Unabridged Charles Dickens

A Tale of Two Cities, Oliver Twist, Great Expectations

The Unabridged Charles Dickens

These elegant volumes are bound in simulated leather with titles stamped in gold and gilt-edged pages. Includes complete and original versions of Oliver Twist, A Tale of Two Cities, and Great Expectations.

Great Expectations

The Sons and Daughters of Charles Dickens

Great Expectations

The strange and varied lives of the ten children of the world's most beloved novelist Charles Dickens, famous for the indelible child characters he created—from Little Nell to Oliver Twist and David Copperfield—was also the father of ten children (and a possible eleventh). What happened to those children is the fascinating subject of Robert Gottlieb's Great Expectations. With sympathy and understanding he narrates the highly various and surprising stories of each of Dickens's sons and daughters, from Kate, who became a successful artist, to Frank, who died in Moline, Illinois, after serving a grim stretch in the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. Each of these lives is fascinating on its own. Together they comprise a unique window on Victorian England as well as a moving and disturbing study of Dickens as a father and as a man.