Who Was Marie Curie

Born in Warsaw, Poland, on November 7, 1867, Marie Curie was forbidden to attend the male-only University of Warsaw, so she enrolled at the Sorbonne in Paris to study physics and mathematics.

Who Was Marie Curie

Born in Warsaw, Poland, on November 7, 1867, Marie Curie was forbidden to attend the male-only University of Warsaw, so she enrolled at the Sorbonne in Paris to study physics and mathematics. There she met a professor named Pierre Curie, and the two soon married, forming one of the most famous scientific partnerships in history. Together they discovered two elements and won a Nobel Prize in 1903. (Later Marie won another Nobel award for chemistry in 1911.) She died in Savoy, France, on July 4, 1934, a victim of many years of exposure to toxic radiation.

Marie Curie

Marie Curie's work in radioactivity changed the way scientists think about matter and energy and led to advancements in the treatment of disease.

Marie Curie

Marie Curie's work in radioactivity changed the way scientists think about matter and energy and led to advancements in the treatment of disease. With her fellow scientist and husband, Pierre Curie, she searched for the source of radioactivity and discovered two elements, radium and polonium. They shared the 1903 Nobel Prize, the world's highest science award, for their discovery.

Marie Curie A Life

The result is a fresh, powerful new biography of a very human Marie Curie... This is an exemplary work, rich in the details and connections that bring a person and her era to life.

Marie Curie  A Life

Marie Curie was long idealized as a selfless and dedicated scientist, not entirely of this world. But Quinn's Marie Curie is, on the contrary, a woman of passion — born in Warsaw under the repressive regime of the Russian czars, outspokenly committed to the cause of a free Poland, deeply in love with her husband Pierre but also, after his tragic death, capable of loving a second time and of standing up against the cruel, xenophobic attacks which resulted from that love. This biography gives a full and lucid account of Marie and Pierre Curie’s scientific discoveries, placing them within the revelatory discoveries of the age. At the same time, it provides a vivid account of Marie Curie’s practical genius: the X-Ray mobiles she created to save French soldiers' lives during World War I, as well as her remarkable ability to raise funds and create a laboratory that drew researchers to Paris from all over the world. It is a story which transforms Marie Curie from an bloodless icon into a woman of passion and courage. "Quinn's portrait of Curie is rich and captivating. Quinn strives to peel back... layers of myth and idealization that have grown up around the physicist... She succeeds beautifully. Quinn has written a worthy successor to her previous work, the award-winning biography of American psychiatrist Karen Horney." — Washington Post Book World (page 1) "A touching, three-dimensional portrait of the Polish-born scientist and two-time Nobel Prize winner." — Kirkus "I've read many biographies of Marie Curie and Susan Quinn's is magnificent. It's so complete and so evocative that I can't imagine anyone coming away from reading it without feeling they actually know Marie Curie." — Alan Alda "Quinn portrays a woman who was both independent and ambitious, in a society that was unprepared for either. The result is a fresh, powerful new biography of a very human Marie Curie... This is an exemplary work, rich in the details and connections that bring a person and her era to life. It is certain to be this generations' definitive biography of Marie Curie." — Science "Quinn breaks ground in her detailed description, drawn from newly available papers, of Marie's life after Pierre's accidental death in 1906. At first so grief-stricken she neglected her two daughters, Irene and Eve, Marie later had a love affair with French scientist Paul Langevin. Because Langevin was married, Marie was vilified by the French press and was almost denied the 1911 Nobel Prize for chemistry." —Publishers Weekly "Susan Quinn's excellent biography gives a lucid account of Curie's contribution to our understanding of 'things'... but Quinn also draws on new material to paint a more rounded and attractive picture of Curie the person... For Marie, the enchantment of her science never waned, and it is this enchantment which Quinn's biography communicates so well." — London Observer

Marie Curie

This informative, accessible, and concise biography looks at Marie Curie not just as a dedicated scientist but also as a complex woman with a sometimes tumultuous personal life.

Marie Curie

This informative, accessible, and concise biography looks at Marie Curie not just as a dedicated scientist but also as a complex woman with a sometimes-tumultuous personal life.

Marie Curie

Marie Curie was the brilliant, trailblazing scientist who discovered radium and coined the term radioactivity.

Marie Curie

Marie Curie was the brilliant, trailblazing scientist who discovered radium and coined the term radioactivity. She is the only woman ever awarded two Nobel Prizes--one in physics and one in chemistry. She helped develop the use of X-rays and radiation therapies that have had a lasting impact on medicine and human health.

DK Life Stories Marie Curie

Discover the inspiring story of Marie Curie--the scientist who made more than one world-changing discovery, and the first woman to win a Nobel Prize--in this fascinating kids' biography.

DK Life Stories Marie Curie

Explore the incredible life and career of Nobel Prize-winning scientist Marie Curie in this children's biography. Discover the inspiring story of Marie Curie--the scientist who made more than one world-changing discovery, and the first woman to win a Nobel Prize--in this fascinating kids' biography. Born to poor school teachers at a time when women could not attend university in her home country of Poland, Marie Curie sought out an underground university and worked hard to save money for further study in Paris. She made it to France, and continued to dedicate herself to science once she had graduated. In the search for new radioactive elements, she undertook physically exhausting work with materials that were later found to be incredibly dangerous. Having finally discovered polonium and radium, the Nobel Prize that should have been hers was first awarded to her husband--but Marie eventually won the fame she deserved. This biography, ideal for kids aged 8-11, charts the major events of Marie's life; from her childhood in Poland, when she discovered her love of science using the lab kit her father brought home from his school, to coining the term "radioactive," to developing World War I mobile radiology units that helped treat countless injured soldiers. DK Life Stories goes beyond the basic facts to tell the true life stories of history's most inspiring people. Full-color photographs and hand-drawn illustrations complement age-appropriate, narrative text. Definition boxes, information sidebars, and inspiring quotes add depth, while a handy reference section at the back makes DK Life Stories the one biography series everyone will want to collect.

Marie Curie

This is none other than Madame Marie Curie, who not only cracked the glass ceiling but completely shattered it.

Marie Curie

*Includes pictures *Includes contemporary accounts *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading "Nothing in life is to be feared, it is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more, so that we may fear less." - Marie Curie The tens of millions who perished in the First World War - not to mention the horrendous turmoil that culminated in the outbreak of its successor - understandably marred the conception of the first decades of the 20th century. However, during that time, unparalleled minds from all over the globe unsnarled age-old mysteries and perfected prevailing theories, conjuring up wave after wave of breakthroughs that catapulted the world of science to unprecedented heights. Owing to this influx of novel ideas and innovative concepts, conferences had to be assembled to keep the relevant scientific spheres apprised of the latest advances. The formation of such conferences also allowed them to confront burning questions and investigate unexplored realms in their respective fields. At first glance, the image, captured at the Solvay Conference in October of 1927, seems no different than any other generic staff or faculty photograph. Pictured are 3 rows of stern, sharply suited figures, the middle and front rows seated on a line of chairs a step apart, and the last row, left to stand upright, hovering behind them in their best distinguished poses. Only upon closer inspection and a proper gander at the faces of those pictured does it dawn on one that this is no ordinary photograph - far from it. Often hailed as the "most intelligent photograph of all time," it features 29 of the most illustrious scientists in the world, 17 of whom were freshly crowned, as well as future Nobel laureates. The most familiar face is that of Albert Einstein, creator of the famous mass-energy equivalence formula (E=mc2) and the general theory of relativity. The 48-year-old had been presented with the Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect" 6 years prior. But in the picture near Einstein, seated two spaces to his left, is an older scientist with a solemn face lined with wisdom, framed by the wispy, snow-white flyaways of her characteristic loose bun. Her thin lips are somewhat pursed in a scowl, and there is an aura of confidence radiating from her, the lone woman amidst a pack of exalted, intimidating men. Her shoulders are relaxed, her legs are crossed under her plain black cloak, and her felt bowler hat rests casually against her lap. This is none other than Madame Marie Curie, who not only cracked the glass ceiling but completely shattered it. Not surprisingly, early 20th century society, stunted by its narrow, patriarchal mindset, assailed her with double the toilsome trials and taxing tribulations, many of which were unique to her solely on account of her gender. Be that as it may, the tenacious pupil-turned-savant soldiered on through the discrimination and clambered over the often gratuitous stumbling blocks, ultimately cementing her place in history as one of the greatest scientists of all time. Marie Curie: The Life and Legacy of the Legendary Scientist Who Became the First Woman to Win a Nobel Prize examines the career that made Madame Curie one of the world's most important figures. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about Marie Curie like never before.

Madame Curie

But, as this book reveals, it was also true. An astonishing mind and a remarkable life are here portrayed by Marie Curie's daughter in a classic and moving account.

Madame Curie

The professional triumphs and personal struggles of a pioneering woman scientist

Marie Curie

Examines the life of the Polish-born scientist who, with her husband Pierre, was awarded a 1903 Nobel Prize for discovering radium.

Marie Curie

Examines the life of the Polish-born scientist who, with her husband Pierre, was awarded a 1903 Nobel Prize for discovering radium.

The Value of Learning

A brief biography emphasizing the importance of learning in the life of the scientist who was awarded the Nobel prize for her work in chemistry.

The Value of Learning

A brief biography emphasizing the importance of learning in the life of the scientist who was awarded the Nobel prize for her work in chemistry.

Pierre and Marie Curie

Pierre and Marie Curie made a terrific scientific team.

Pierre and Marie Curie

Pierre and Marie Curie made a terrific scientific team. They coined the term "radioactivity" and discovered two new radioactive elements: radium and polonium. Through engaging yet accessible text, readers will follow them as they grow up in loving families dedicated to education, develop into budding scientists, get married, and launch their lab. Students will learn about the Curies' hardships and triumphs and explore how scientific discovery builds upon itself and other scientists into the future. Detailed diagrams and informative sidebars help simplify the details of important scientific concepts, such as piezoelectricity, radioactivity, and Becquerel rays.

Marie Curie

These illustrated biographies combine accessible technical information with compelling personal stories to portray the scientists whose work has shaped our understanding of the natural world.

Marie Curie

Marie Curie discovered radium and went on to lead the scientific community in studying the theory behind and the uses of radioactivity. She left a vast legacy to future scientists through her research, her teaching, and her contributions to the welfare of humankind. She was the first person to win two Nobel Prizes, yet upon her death in 1934, Albert Einstein was moved to say, "Marie Curie is, of all celebrated beings, the only one whom fame has not corrupted." She was a physicist, a wife and mother, and a groundbreaking professional woman. This biography is an inspirational and exciting story of scientific discovery and personal commitment. Oxford Portraits in Science is an on-going series of scientific biographies for young adults. Written by top scholars and writers, each biography examines the personality of its subject as well as the thought process leading to his or her discoveries. These illustrated biographies combine accessible technical information with compelling personal stories to portray the scientists whose work has shaped our understanding of the natural world.

Biopic Marie Curie Volume 1 The Radium Fairy

Marie Curie is the only woman ever to have received two Nobel prizes: the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1903, shared with her husband, Pierre Curie, and the Nobel Prize for Chemistry for her work with polonium and radium in 1911.

Biopic Marie Curie   Volume 1   The Radium Fairy

Marie Curie is the only woman ever to have received two Nobel prizes: the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1903, shared with her husband, Pierre Curie, and the Nobel Prize for Chemistry for her work with polonium and radium in 1911. She was also the first woman ever to teach at the Sorbonne. This inspired comic is set at the time she received her second Nobel Prize, when a vicious press campaign was launched against her, denouncing her affair with the physician Paul Langevin. Through her flash-backs, we're invited to witness the key moments of this exceptional woman's life and work.

Making Marie Curie

In Making Marie Curie, Eva Hemmungs Wirtén traces a career that spans two centuries and a world war, providing an innovative and historically grounded account of how modern science emerges in tandem with celebrity culture under the ...

Making Marie Curie

In many ways, Marie Curie represents modern science. Her considerable lifetime achievements—the first woman to be awarded a Nobel Prize, the only woman to be awarded the prize in two fields, and the only person to be awarded Nobel Prizes in multiple sciences—are studied by schoolchildren across the world. She is a role model to women embarking on a career in science, the pride of two nations—Poland and France—and, not least of all, a European Union brand for excellence in science. In Making Marie Curie, Eva Hemmungs Wirtén traces a career that spans two centuries and a world war, providing an innovative and historically grounded account of how modern science emerges in tandem with celebrity culture under the influence of intellectual property in a dawning age of information. How did one create and maintain for oneself the persona of scientist at the beginning of the twentieth century ? What special conditions bore upon scientific women, and on married women in particular ? How, and with what consequences, was a scientific reputation secured ? In its exploration of these questions and many more, Making Marie Curie provides a composite picture not only of the making of Marie Curie, but of the making of modern science itself.

Marie Curie

The Marie Curie that emerges from this account is a woman of great integrity and self-discipline, acutely conscious of her historic role, keenly devoted to protecting her private life, and yet willing to shape her personality to the public ...

Marie Curie

Professional biographer Carl Rollyson has pioneered a new kind of biography for children and adults alike. His narrative of "Marie Curie's" life is rendered in simple, precise prose, but he also includes material addressed to adults--especially to parents who wish some guidance in discussing what their children read. This home schooling biography also includes a timeline, sources for further study, a glossary, and an index. Vivid quotations from those who knew "Marie Curie" as well as a "points to ponder" section in each chapter are designed to provoke further discussion and research into the life and career of one of the century's greatest scientists and--as Rollyson shows--one of the most important figures in human history. At a time when the ethics of science and of scientists has been called into question, Rollyson's searching examination of Madame Curie's methods and morality makes this a sharply focused and challenging biography. The "Marie Curie" that emerges from this account is a woman of great integrity and self-discipline, acutely conscious of her historic role, keenly devoted to protecting her private life, and yet willing to shape her personality to the public roles demanded of her.

Marie Curie

A biography of the chemist whose research with radium made her the first woman to receive a Nobel Prize and the first person to receive the award twice.

Marie Curie

A biography of the chemist whose research with radium made her the first woman to receive a Nobel Prize and the first person to receive the award twice.

Marie Curie

Her amazing story and groundbreaking work are the subjects of this essential volume, notable for incorporating personal documents, photographs, and other primary sources to support the details of Curie’s life.

Marie Curie

Marie Curie is the only woman in history to win the Nobel Prize in two fields—physics and chemistry. Her amazing story and groundbreaking work are the subjects of this essential volume, notable for incorporating personal documents, photographs, and other primary sources to support the details of Curie’s life. Readers will recognize the heroism of Curie in the face of great challenges. For example, women in Poland during Curie’s school years could not obtain a university degree—she had to travel to France to study. They will also appreciate how Curie’s work in X-ray technology was applied to medicine, saving the lives of millions.

Obsessive Genius The Inner World of Marie Curie Great Discoveries

Through family interviews, diaries, letters, and workbooks that had been sealed for over sixty years, Barbara Goldsmith reveals the Marie Curie behind the myth—an all-too-human woman struggling to balance a spectacular scientific career, ...

Obsessive Genius  The Inner World of Marie Curie  Great Discoveries

The bestselling, "excellent…poignant—and scientifically lucid—portrait" (New York Times Book Review) of the remarkable Marie Curie. Through family interviews, diaries, letters, and workbooks that had been sealed for over sixty years, Barbara Goldsmith reveals the Marie Curie behind the myth—an all-too-human woman struggling to balance a spectacular scientific career, a demanding family, the prejudice of society, and her own passionate nature. Obsessive Genius is a dazzling portrait of Curie, her amazing scientific success, and the price she paid for fame.

Marie Curie

Marie Curie


Madame Curie

Written by Curie's daughter, the renowned international activist Eve Curie, this biography chronicles Curie's legendary achievements in science, including her pioneering efforts in the study of radioactivity and her two Nobel Prizes in ...

Madame Curie

"A biography [of Nobel Prize winner Madame Curie] that stirs the heart and the mind by a fine counterpoint of sense and sensibility, a great story superbly told."--New York Times Marie Sklodowska Curie (1867-1934) was the first woman scientist to win worldwide acclaim and was, indeed, one of the great scientists of the twentieth century. Written by Curie's daughter, the renowned international activist Eve Curie, this biography chronicles Curie's legendary achievements in science, including her pioneering efforts in the study of radioactivity and her two Nobel Prizes in Physics and Chemistry. It also spotlights her remarkable life, from her childhood in Poland, to her storybook Parisian marriage to fellow scientist Pierre Curie, to her tragic death from the very radium that brought her fame. Now updated with an eloquent, rousing introduction by best-selling author Natalie Angier, this timeless biography celebrates an astonishing mind and a extraordinary woman's life.