Who was who in Egyptology

Who was who in Egyptology

Revision of: Who was who in Egyptology / Warren R. Dawson and Eric P. Uphill. -- Second revised edition. -- London: Egypt Expoloration Society, 1972.

Egyptology from the First World War to the Third Reich

Ideology, Scholarship, and Individual Biographies

Egyptology from the First World War to the Third Reich

Only recently has Egyptology started examining ideology and its implications for our self-understanding and understanding of ancient Egypt, Egyptology, and the past as a whole. This edition presents aspects of ideology, scholarship, and individual biographies from World War I to the “Third Reich”.

Egyptology in the Present

Experiential and Experimental Methods in Archaeology

Egyptology in the Present

This volume builds bridges between usually-separate social groups, between different methodologies and even between disciplines. It is the result of an innovative conference held at Swansea University in 2010, which brought together leading craftspeople and academics to explore the all-too-often opposed practices of experimental and experiential archaeology. The focus is upon Egyptology, but the volume has a wider importance. The experimental method is privileged in academic institutions and thus perhaps is subject to clear definitions. It tends to be associated with the scientific and technological. In opposition, the experiential is more rarely defined and is usually associated with schoolchildren, museums and heritage centres; it is often criticised for being unscientific. The introductory chapter of this volume examines the development of these traditionally-assumed differences, giving for the first time a critical and careful definition of the experiential in relation to the experimental. The two are seen as points on a continuum with much common ground. This claim is borne out by succeeding chapters, which cover such topics as textiles, woodworking and stoneworking. And Salima Ikram, Professor of Egyptology at the American University in Cairo, here demonstrates remarkably that our understanding of the classic Egyptian funerary practice of mummification benefits from both 'scientific' experimental and sensual experiential approaches. The volume, however, is important not only for Egyptology but for archaeological method more generally. The papers illuminate the pioneering of individuals who founded modern archaeological practice. Several papers are truly groundbreaking and deserve to circulate far beyond Egyptology. Thus the archaeologist Marquardt Lund tackles the problem of understanding the earliest known depictions of flint knife manufacture, those from an Egyptian tomb dated around 1900 BC. He shows the importance of thinking outside 'traditional', i.e. modern, knapping practice. Lund's knapping method, guided by the tomb depictions, is surprising but effective, and very different from that presented in manuals of lithic technology or taught in academic institutions.

Histories of Egyptology

Interdisciplinary Measures

Histories of Egyptology

Histories of Egyptology are increasingly of interest: to Egyptologists, archaeologists, historians, and others. Yet, particularly as Egypt undergoes a contested process of political redefinition, how do we write these histories, and what (or who) are they for? This volume addresses a variety of important themes, the historical involvement of Egyptology with the political sphere, the manner in which the discipline stakes out its professional territory, the ways in which practitioners represent Egyptological knowledge, and the relationship of this knowledge to the public sphere. Histories of Egyptology provides the basis to understand how Egyptologists constructed their discipline. Yet the volume also demonstrates how they construct ancient Egypt, and how that construction interacts with much wider concerns: of society, and of the making of the modern world.

Charles Edwin Wilbour And the Birth Of American Egyptology

Charles Edwin Wilbour And the Birth Of American Egyptology

This work is intended to provide a biographical account into the life and archaeological exploits of Charles Edwin Wilbour. The text focuses on Wilbour's overall contributions to the field of American Egyptology.

Science in Egyptology

Science in Egyptology


Egyptology

Search for the Tomb of Osiris, Being the Journal of Miss Emily Sands, November 1926-

Egyptology

Elaborate facsimile journal of a fictional Emily Sand's 1926 search for the tomb of the god Osiris presents an overview of ancient Egypt and Egyptology.

Current Research in Egyptology 2006

Proceedings of the Seventh Annual Symposium

Current Research in Egyptology 2006

The Seventh annual Current Research in Egyptology Symposium (CRE 2006) was held on 6-8 April 2006, at the University of Oxford, and brought together graduate and postgraduate students of Egyptology from institutions world-wide. A total of 44 students presented their new and on-going research on a variety of topics including archaeology, art and architecture, history and society, literature and language, religion, museum studies, scientific analysis, history of Egyptology and 'egyptomania, ' spanning the entire period of Egyptian history from Predynastic to Coptic times. The papers published here cover the same wide range of research areas and multi-disciplinary approaches.