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Why Knowledge Matters

Author: E. D. Hirsch
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
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In Why Knowledge Matters, influential scholar E. D. Hirsch, Jr., addresses critical issues in contemporary education reform and shows how cherished truisms about education and child development have led to unintended and negative consequences. Hirsch, author of The Knowledge Deficit, draws on recent findings in neuroscience and data from France to provide new evidence for the argument that a carefully planned, knowledge-based elementary curriculum is essential to providing the foundations for children’s life success and ensuring equal opportunity for students of all backgrounds. In the absence of a clear, common curriculum, Hirsch contends that tests are reduced to measuring skills rather than content, and that students from disadvantaged backgrounds cannot develop the knowledge base to support high achievement. Hirsch advocates for updated policies based on a set of ideas that are consistent with current cognitive science, developmental psychology, and social science. The book focuses on six persistent problems of recent US education: the over-testing of students; the scapegoating of teachers; the fadeout of preschool gains; the narrowing of the curriculum; the continued achievement gap between demographic groups; and the reliance on standards that are not linked to a rigorous curriculum. Hirsch examines evidence from the United States and other nations that a coherent, knowledge-based approach to schooling has improved both achievement and equity wherever it has been instituted, supporting the argument that the most significant education reform and force for equality of opportunity and greater social cohesion is the reform of fundamental educational ideas. Why Knowledge Matters introduces a new generation of American educators to Hirsch’s astute and passionate analysis.


Why Knowledge Matters in Curriculum

Author: Leesa Wheelahan
Publisher: Routledge
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What should we teach in our schools and vocational education and higher education institutions? Is theoretical knowledge still important? This book argues that providing students with access to knowledge should be the raison d'être of education. Its premise is that access to knowledge is an issue of social justice because society uses it to conduct its debates and controversies. Theoretical knowledge is increasingly marginalised in curriculum in all sectors of education, particularly in competency-based training which is the dominant curriculum model in vocational education in many countries. This book uses competency-based training to explore the negative consequences that arise when knowledge is displaced in curriculum in favour of a focus on workplace relevance. The book takes a unique approach by using the sociology of Basil Bernstein and the philosophy of critical realism as complementary modes of theorising to extend and develop social realist arguments about the role of knowledge in curriculum. Both approaches are increasingly influential in education and the social sciences and the book will be helpful for those seeking an accessible introduction to these complex subjects. Why Knowledge Matters in Curriculum is a key reading for those interested in the sociology of education, curriculum studies, work-based learning, vocational education, higher education, adult and community education, tertiary education policy and lifelong learning more broadly.


The Nature and Value of Knowledge

Author: Duncan Pritchard
Publisher: OUP Oxford
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This volume comprises three distinct investigations into the relationship between the nature and the value of knowledge. Each is written by one of the authors in consultation with the other two. 'Knowledge and Understanding' (by Duncan Pritchard) critically examines virtue-theoretic responses to the problem of the value of knowledge, and argues that the finally valuable cognitive state is not knowledge but understanding. 'Knowledge and Recognition' (by Alan Millar) develops an account of knowledge in which the idea of a recognitional ability plays a prominent role, and argues that this account enables us better to understand knowledge and its value. 'Knowledge and Action' (by Adrian Haddock) argues for an account of knowledge and justification which explains why knowledge is valuable, and enables us to make sense of the knowledge we have of our intentional actions.


Knowledge That Matters

Author: Lucy Tatman
Publisher: A&C Black
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Lucy Tatman identifies the events and ideas that influenced the formation of a North american feminist paradigm. She explores the components of this paradigm, particularly the way in which they affect the understanding of knowledge. She then examines the representation of these elements in the theologies of three prominent feminist theologians in North America: Rosemary Radford Ruether, Carter Heyward, and Sallie McFague. From her discussion of these scholars, she proposes that a responsible feminist practice of epistemology requires participatory discernment.


Handbook on Knowledge Management 1

Author: Clyde Holsapple
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
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As the most comprehensive reference work dealing with knowledge management (KM), this work, consisting of 2 volumes, is essential for the library of every KM practitioner, researcher, and educator. Written by an international array of KM luminaries, its approx. 60 chapters approach knowledge management from a wide variety of perspectives ranging from classic foundations to cutting-edge thought, informative to provocative, theoretical to practical, historical to futuristic, human to technological, and operational to strategic. Novices and experts alike will refer to the authoritative and stimulating content again and again for years to come.


Knowledge and the Study of Education

Author: Geoff Whitty
Publisher: Symposium Books Ltd
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In the English-speaking world, university Schools of Education are usually heavily involved in the professional preparation of teachers. Yet, in England and the USA in particular, the role of universities in teacher education has increasingly seemed under threat as alternative providers of training have come on the scene, often with the overt encouragement of governments. This book, which is based on a project that explored how the study of Education is configured in different countries, makes visible the different knowledge traditions that inform university teaching and research in Education around the world. The extent to which these are related to the training of teachers is shown to vary historically and comparatively. The book consists of a substantial introduction by the editors, which identifies 12 major knowledge traditions in the study of education, and classifies these as Academic Knowledge Traditions (such as Sciences de l’Éducation), Practical Knowledge Traditions (like that practised in Normal Colleges) and Integrated Knowledge Traditions (including the currently fashionable concept of Research-informed Clinical Practice). This introduction is followed by contributions on the nature of Education as a field of study in six countries – Australia, China, France, Germany, Latvia and the USA – authored by established experts from each of those jurisdictions. There are also chapters that provide useful conceptual frameworks for understanding the dimensions on which the various traditions in the study of Education differ, as well as those that compare the nature of Education along specific dimensions in different countries. The book concludes with a discussion, in the light of these contributions, of future prospects for the field of Education. The book will appeal to students, teachers and researchers in Education and is intended to encourage less parochial thinking about the nature of Education as a field of international study.


Knowledge Matters

Author: Paul Axelrod
Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
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An insightful look by leading scholars at the changing face of the contemporary university.


Advances in Animal Welfare Science 1984

Author: M.W. Fox
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
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This book, the first in an annual series, written by academicians scientists, philosophers and others-is not intended exclusively for an imal welfarists and conservationists. Since it is written* by scholars, it will appeal to a wide range of academic and professional readers who are involved with animals for scientific, economic, altruistic, and other reasons. While this first volume cannot cover the entire spectrum of animal welfare science-related topics, it does, in its diversity of con tributions, demonstrate the multi-faceted and interdisciplinary nature of the subject of this new series. Indeed, animals are as much an integral part of society as we are dependent upon them. The many interfaces between us and the billions of animals under our dominion (as well as the environment upon which the welfare of human and non-human animals alike is ultimately de pendent) have their separate features: trapping and wildlife manage ment; laboratory animal research; whaling and fishing; veterinary practice; agriculture and farm animal husbandry; horse racing and the ownership of animal companions; the propagation of captive wildlife and their preservation in the wild; the use of animals as companions and for the purposes of vicarious entertainment.


The metaphysics of epistemology

Author: Ernest Sosa
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
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A collection of papers by leading figures on metaphysical issues pertaining to epistemology Brings together fresh, original work that well represents the present state of the field Considers the metaphysics of perception and of experience, disjunctivism, content externalism, epistemic abilities, the lottery paradox, the epistemology of consciousness, the metaphysics of knowledge as a state, and the ontology of reasons


Why Geography Matters

Author: Harm de Blij
Publisher: Oxford University Press
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In recent years our world has seen transformations of all kinds: intense climate change accompanied by significant weather extremes; deadly tsunamis caused by submarine earthquakes; unprecedented terrorist attacks; costly wars in Iraq and Afghanistan; a terrible and overlooked conflict in Equatorial Africa costing millions of lives; an economic crisis threatening the stability of the international system. Is there some way we can get our minds around these disparate global upheavals, to grasp these events and their interconnections, and place our turbulent world in a more understandable light? Acclaimed author Harm de Blij answers this question with one word: geography. In this revised edition of the immensely popular and influential Why Geography Matters, de Blij tackles topics from the burgeoning presence of China to the troubling disarray of the European Union, from the dangerous nuclear ambitions of North Korea to the revolutionary Arab Spring. By improving our understanding of the world's geography, de Blij shows, we can better respond to the events around us, and better prepare ourselves to face the global challenges ahead. Peppering his writing with anecdotes from his own professional travels, de Blij expands upon his original argument, offering an updated work that is as engaging as it is eye-opening. Casual students of geography and professional policy-makers alike will benefit from this stimulating and crucial perspective on geography and the way it shapes our world's events. America, de Blij warns, has become the world's most geographically illiterate society of consequence. Indeed, despite increasing global interconnectivity and rapid change, Americans seem to be less informed and less knowledgeable about the rest of the world than ever. In this compelling volume, de Blij shows why this dispiriting picture must change, and change now.