William Gilmore Simms and the American Frontier

This collection of essays emphasizes his portrayal of America's westward migration.

William Gilmore Simms and the American Frontier

William Gilmore Simms (1807-1870), the antebellum South's foremost author and cultural critic, was the first advocate of regionalism in the creation of national literature. This collection of essays emphasizes his portrayal of America's westward migration.

Pirates and Devils

Recent scholarship about Simms, including William Gilmore Simms's Unfinished Civil War, reasserts the significance of Simms's postwar writing and makes this volume's contribution timely.

Pirates and Devils

Pirates and Devils, edited by Nicholas G. Meriwether and David W. Newton, presents two of the most significant unfinished works by William Gilmore Simms, a prominent public intellectual of the antebellum South and one of the most prolific literary writers of the nineteenth century. These two incomplete works—the pirate romance, “The Brothers of the Coast,” and the folk fable, “Sir Will O’ Wisp”—are representative of the some of the last major primary texts of Simms’s expansive career. Recent scholarship about Simms, including William Gilmore Simms’s Unfinished Civil War, reasserts the significance of Simms’s postwar writing and makes this volume’s contribution timely. Left unfinished at his death, these two substantial fragments represent the last of the major primary texts from the final phase of Simms’s life to be published. Together, the texts provide greater insight into Simms’s creative process, but more importantly, they show Simms continuing to wrestle with the issues he faced in the aftermath of the Civil War, and they document the creativity and courage that commitment represented—and required. The publication of these fragments makes possible a complete picture of this last phase of Simms’s life, as he struggled with the consequences of a conflict that had become the defining event of his life, career, and region.

Visions of Order in William Gilmore Simms

McHaney , Thomas L. “ Simms's Border Beagles : A Carnival of Frontier Voices . ” William Gilmore Simms and the American Frontier . Ed . John Caldwell Guilds and Caroline Collins . Athens : University of Georgia Press , 1997. 95–104 .

Visions of Order in William Gilmore Simms

Regarded as one of America's foremost 19th century men of letters, poet, historian and novelist William Gilmore Simms seems to have been marginalised in modern times as a result of his allegiance to the ideals of the Confederacy. In this study, the author compares his work with that of James Fennimore Cooper and Nathaniel Hawthorne.

William Gilmore Simms s Selected Reviews on Literature and Civilization

Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1986. ———. “Stewardship and Patria in Simms's Frontier Poetry.” In John Caldwell Guilds and Caroline Collins, eds. William Gilmore Simms and the American Frontier, 209– 20. Athens: University of Georgia ...

William Gilmore Simms s Selected Reviews on Literature and Civilization

During William Gilmore Simms’s life (1806–1870), book reviews and critical essays became vital parts of American literary culture and intellectual discourse. Simms was an assiduous reviewer and essayist, proving by example the importance of those genres. William Gilmore Simms’s Selected Reviews on Literature and Civilization publishes for the first time in book form sixty-two examples of the writer’s hundreds of newspaper and periodical reviews and book notes as well as four important critical essays. Together, the reviews and essays reveal the regional, national, and international dimensions of Simms’s intellectual interests. To frame the two distinct parts of Selected Reviews, James Everett Kibler, Jr., and David Moltke-Hansen have written a general introduction that considers the development of book reviewing and the authorship of essays in cultural and historical contexts. In part one, Kibler offers an introduction that examines Simms’s reviewing habits and the aesthetic and critical values that informed the author’s reviews. Kibler then publishes selected texts of reviews and provides historical and cultural backgrounds for each selection. Simms was an early proponent of the critical theories of Romantics such as William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Edgar Allan Poe. Widely read in European history and literature, he reviewed works published in French, German, and classics in original Greek and Latin and in translation. Simms also was an early, ardent advocate of works of local color and of southern “backwoods” humorists of his day. Simms published notices of seven of Herman Melville’s novels, the writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson, and favorably reviewed Henry David Thoreau’s Walden; or, Life in the Woods. Simms published numerous review essays of twenty thousand or more words in literary journals and also republished two collections in book form. These volumes treated such subjects as Americanism in literature and the American Revolution in South Carolina. Yet, as part two of Selected Reviews demonstrates, Simms ranged much more widely in the intellectual milieu. Such cultural and political topics as the 1848 revolution in France, the history of the literary essay, the roles of women in the American Revolution, and the activities of the southern convention in Nashville in 1850 captured Simms’s attention. Moltke-Hansen’s introduction to part two examines Simms’s roles in, and responses to, the Romantic critical revolution and the other revolutions then roiling Europe and America.

Imagining Southern Spaces

Hemispheric and Transatlantic Souths in Antebellum US Writings Deniz Bozkurt-Pekar. 198 Kolodny, “Letting Go”, p. 3. ... William Gilmore Simms and the American Frontier, Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2016, p. 10.

Imagining Southern Spaces

Identifying the antebellum era in the United States as a transitional setting, Imagining Southern Spaces ́investigates spatialization processes about the South during a time when intensifying debates over the abolition of slavery led to a heightened period of (re)spatialization in the region. Taking the question of abolition as a major factor that shaped how different actors responded to these processes, this book studies spatial imaginations in a selection of abolitionist and proslavery literature of the era. Through this diversity of imaginations, the book points to a multitude of Souths in various economic, political, and cultural entanglements in the American Hemisphere and the Circumatlantic. Thus, it challenges monolithic and provincial representations of the South as a provincial region distinct from the rest of the country.

The Wigwam and the Cabin

William Gilmore Simms and the American Frontier. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1997. [collection of essays on different aspects of Simms's extensive treatment of the frontier] Hubbell, Jay B. The South in American Literature, ...

The Wigwam and the Cabin

One of the most important volumes of short fiction published before the Civil War. The Wigwam and the Cabin represents William Gilmore Simms at his very best. It is the work that led Poe to say of Simms, ". . . in invention, in vigor, in movement, in the power of exciting interest, and in the artistical management of his themes, he has surpassed, we think, any of his countrymen." Praised by critics on both sides of the Atlantic, The Wigwam and the Cabin focuses n the Southern frontier that Simms knew so well, a frontier whose vernacular, courage, humor, folklore, violence, injustice, and beauty are vividly brought to life through the strokes of his pen. "I have seen the life," Simms wrote, "--have lived it--and much of my material . . . is the planter, the squatter, the Indian, the negro--the bold and hardy pioneer, the vigorous yeomen--these are the subjects." Simms's portrayal of frontier life is the most realistic and graphic in all nineteenth-century American literature; and the Arkansas edition of The Wigwam and the Cabin, with Dr. Guilds's fine editing and informative introductin, brings back into print an invaluable contribution to the development of the short story in America.

The Simms Reader

William Gilmore Simms and the American Frontier . Athens , Ga . , 1997. Essays by Moltke - Hansen , Elliott West , Guilds , Moore , Jan Bakker , Collins , Thomas L. McHaney , Nancy Grantham , David W. Newton , Wimsatt , Molly Boyd ...

The Simms Reader

Long considered a leading literary figure of the Old South, William Gilmore Simms (1806-1870) wrote letters, novels, short fiction, drama, essays, and poetry in his prolific career. Born in Charleston to an old South Carolina family of modest means and raised by a grandmother with whom his father left him after his mother's death, Simms felt a simultaneous sense of loyalty to and alienation from his native region. He was a major intellectual figure on the East Coast before the Civil War but saw his New York publishers abandon him after secession, of which he was a vocal supporter. Simms's novels and poetry have been published in modern editions, and he has been the subject of numerous biographies and critical studies, but until now there has been no collection covering the broad spectrum of his writings. The Simms Reader presents a selection of his nonnovelistic work--letters, short fiction, essays, historical writings, poetry, and epigrams--chosen and introduced by the preeminent Simms scholar John Caldwell Guilds.

The Artist as Historian

This study examines the southern frontier as it is portrayed in the works of William Gilmore Simms, William Faulkner, and Eudora Welty.

The Artist as Historian


Blood in the Hills

Richard Slotkin, Regeneration through Violence: The Mythology of the American Frontier, 1600–1860 (Middleton, CT: Wesleyan ... “Simms's Concept of Romance and His Realistic Frontier,” in Guilds and Collins, William Gilmore Simms, 79–91.

Blood in the Hills

To many antebellum Americans, Appalachia was a frightening wilderness of lawlessness, peril, robbers, and hidden dangers. The extensive media coverage of horse stealing and scalping raids profiled the regionÕs residents as intrinsically violent. After the Civil War, this characterization continued to permeate perceptions of the area and news of the conflict between the Hatfields and the McCoys, as well as the bloodshed associated with the coal labor strikes, cemented AppalachiaÕs violent reputation. Blood in the Hills: A History of Violence in Appalachia provides an in-depth historical analysis of hostility in the region from the late eighteenth to the early twentieth century. Editor Bruce E. Stewart discusses aspects of the Appalachian violence culture, examining skirmishes with the native population, conflicts resulting from the regionÕs rapid modernization, and violence as a function of social control. The contributors also address geographical isolation and ethnicity, kinship, gender, class, and race with the purpose of shedding light on an often-stereotyped regional past. Blood in the Hills does not attempt to apologize for the region but uses detailed research and analysis to explain it, delving into the social and political factors that have defined Appalachia throughout its violent history.

The Humor of the Old South

“Reveille in the West: Western Travelers in the St. Louis Weekly Reveille, 1844–1850.” Travelers on the Western Frontier. Ed. John Francis McDermott. ... William Gilmore Simms and the American Frontier. Ed. John Caldwell Guilds and ...

The Humor of the Old South

The humor of the Old South -- tales, almanac entries, turf reports, historical sketches, gentlemen's essays on outdoor sports, profiles of local characters -- flourished between 1830 and 1860. The genre's popularity and influence can be traced in the works of major southern writers such as William Faulkner, Erskine Caldwell, Eudora Welty, Flannery O'Connor, and Harry Crews, as well as in contemporary popular culture focusing on the rural South. This collection of essays includes some of the past twenty five years' best writing on the subject, as well as ten new works bringing fresh insights and original approaches to the subject. A number of the essays focus on well known humorists such as Augustus Baldwin Longstreet, Johnson Jones Hooper, William Tappan Thompson, and George Washington Harris, all of whom have long been recognized as key figures in Southwestern humor. Other chapters examine the origins of this early humor, in particular selected poems of William Henry Timrod and Washington Irving's "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow," which anticipate the subject matter, character types, structural elements, and motifs that would become part of the Southwestern tradition. Renditions of "Sleepy Hollow" were later echoed in sketches by William Tappan Thompson, Joseph Beckman Cobb, Orlando Benedict Mayer, Francis James Robinson, and William Gilmore Simms. Several essays also explore antebellum southern humor in the context of race and gender. This literary legacy left an indelible mark on the works of later writers such as Mark Twain and William Faulkner, whose works in a comic vein reflect affinities and connections to the rich lode of materials initially popularized by the Southwestern humorists.

The cub of the panther

William Gilmore Simms and the American Frontier . Athens : University of Georgia Press , 1997. ( Collection of essays examining from traditional and theoretical perspectives Simms's multifaceted portrayal of America's westward migration ...

The cub of the panther


Backwoods Tales

William Gilmore Simms and the American Frontier. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1997. Evaluative essays by Edwin T. Arnold, Jan Baaker, Molly Boyd, Caroline Collins, Gerard Donovan, Nancy Grantham, John C. Guilds, James E. Kibler ...

Backwoods Tales

The writings of William Gilmore Simms (1806–1870) provide a sweeping fictional portrait of the colonial and antebellum South in all of its regional diversity. Simms’s account of the region is more comprehensive than that of any other author of his time; he treats the major intellectual and social issues of the South and depicts the bonds and tensions among all of its inhabitants. By the mid-1840s Simms’s novels were so well known that Edgar Allan Poe could call him “the best novelist which this country has, on the whole, produced.” The twelfth volume in the ongoing Arkansas Edition of the works of William Gilmore Simms, Backwoods Tales brings together three of the best examples of his comic writing. All were written during the last decade of Simms’s life, when he had become a master of his craft. These three tales belong in the tradition of southern backwoods humor, a genre that flourished before the Civil War and produced classic tales by such authors as George Washington Harris, Johnson Jones Hooper, and Thomas Bangs Thorpe. Paddy McGann, “Sharp Snaffles,” and “Bill Bauldy” are all frame tales, told by rustic narrators in authentic dialect, with frequent pauses for libation and comment. These three pieces of writing, never before published together, stand among the best examples of American humor of the nineteenth century.

Helen Halsey a Tale of the Borders c

William Gilmore Simms and the American Frontier . Athens : University of Georgia Press , 1997. ( collection of essays on different aspects of Simms's extensive treatment of the frontier ] Hubbell , Jay B. The South in American ...

Helen Halsey  a Tale of the Borders  c


A Sober Desire for History

William Gilmore Simms . ” In Dictionary of Literary Biography . Vol . 73 , American Magazine Journalists , 1741–1850 , edited by Sam G. Riley , 275–92 . Detroit : Gale Research Co. , 1988 . Langdon , Samuel .

A Sober Desire for History

Widely regarded as the antebellum South's foremost man of letters, William Gilmore Simms (1806-1870) wrote novels and poetry that recently have enjoyed a remarkable resurgence of interest. While scholars have previously considered Simms as primarily a poet, editor, and writer of fiction, Sean R. Busick contends that the author is more fully understood as a historian. In this fresh look at Simms and his contributions, Busick brings to light the lasting impact of the South Carolinian's efforts to comprehend American history and to preserve important pieces of the historical record. In A Sober Desire for History, Busick argues that Simms made five significant contributions to American historiography. Simms's achievements include his work as an archivist, preserving a wealth of primary source materials that probably would not exist today if not for his efforts; as a champion of accessible and well-wrought historical writing; and as an advocate for what he considered democratic history - history that recognizes individuals rather than impersonal forces as the impetus for historical events. Loyalists and women, traditionally neglected in the telling of American history. Finally, although Busick shows that Simms published historical romances, biographies, and a state history, he also made an important, lasting contribution to the writing of American history through his support and encouragement of other historians. Busick addresses, among other topics, Simms's ideas on the relationship between history and fiction, his work as a biographer, his writing of the text that would be used to teach history to generations of South Carolina schoolchildren, and his controversial 1856 Northern lecture series on South Carolina's role in the American Revolution.

Border Beagles c

[ see " William Gilmore Simms : Writer and Hero , " 30-51 ] McHaney , Thomas L. " Frontier Voices in Simms's Border Beagles . " In William Gilmore Simms and the American Frontier . Ed . John Caldwell Guilds and Caroline Collins .

Border Beagles  c


Eutaw

William Gilmore Simms and the American Frontier. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1997. Evaluative essays by Edwin T. Arnold, Jan Baaker, Molly Boyd, Caroline Collins, Gerard Donovan, Nancy Grantham, John C. Guilds, James E. Kibler ...

Eutaw

The battle of Eutaw Springs in 1781 that ended British domination of South Carolina is the focus of this historical novel that brings to life such notable figures as Francis Marion, Nathanael Greene, and Light-Horse Harry Lee and includes a critical introduction by the editor and the author's chronology, as well as appendixes dealing with textual matters. Reprint.

The Partisan

William Gilmore Simms and the American Frontier. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1997. Evaluative essays by Edwin T. Arnold, Jan Baaker, Molly Boyd, Caroline Collins, Gerard Donovan, Nancy Grantham, John C. Guilds, James E. Kibler ...

The Partisan

The thirteenth volume in the ongoing Arkansas Edition of the works of Simms, The Partisan is the first in order of publication of Simms's Revolutionary War romances.

Martin Faber

William Gilmore Simms and the American Frontier. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1997. Hubbell, Jay B. The South in American Literature, 1607–1900. Durham: Duke University Press, 1954. Jett, Kevin W. “A Seductive Plea from the ...

Martin Faber

William Gilmore Simms’s (1806–1870) body of work, a sweeping fictional portrait of the colonial and antebellum South in all its regional diversity, with its literary and intellectual issues, is probably more comprehensive than any other nineteenth-century southern author. Simms’s career began with a short novel, Martin Faber, published in 1833. This Gothic tale is reminiscent of James Hogg’s Confessions of a Sinner and was written four years before Edgar Allan Poe’s “William Wilson.” Narrated in the first person, it is considered a pioneering examination of criminal psychology. Martin seduces then murders Emily so that he might marry another woman, Constance. Martin confesses to his friend and is killed after attempting to stab Constance when she visits him in jail. The book was immediately successful and was well received by the northern media, thus starting Simms’s successful career as a writer, one that would rank him as the only major southern literary figure besides Poe before the Civil War. As with other volumes in the Arkansas Edition of Simms’s work, this volume includes a critical introduction by the editor and a Simms chronology, as well as appendices dealing with textual matters. This edition also includes Simms’s 1829 story, “Confessions of a Murderer,” which was the germ for his first book of fiction.

Fatal Fictions

Rayburn S. Moore, “William Gilmore Simms's Guy Rivers and the Frontier,” in William Gilmore Simms and the American Frontier, ed. John Caldwell Guilds and Caroline Collins (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1997), 55–63, quote on 55.

Fatal Fictions

Writers of fiction have always confronted topics of crime and punishment. This age-old fascination with crime on the part of both authors and readers is not surprising, given that criminal justice touches on so many political and psychological themes essential to literature, and comes equippedwith a trial process that contains its own dramatic structure. This volume explores this profound and enduring literary engagement with crime, investigation, and criminal justice. The collected essays explore three themes that connect the world of law with that of fiction. First, defining and punishing crime is one of the fundamental purposes of government,along with the protection of victims by the prevention of crime. And yet criminal punishment remains one of the most abused and terrifying forms of political power. Second, crime is intensely psychological and therefore an important subject by which a writer can develop and explore character. Athird connection between criminal justice and fiction involves the inherently dramatic nature of the legal system itself, particularly the trial. Moreover, the ongoing public conversation about crime and punishment suggests that the time is ripe for collaboration between law and literature in thistroubled domain.The essays in this collection span a wide array of genres, including tragic drama, science fiction, lyric poetry, autobiography, and mystery novels. The works discussed include works as old as fifth-century BCE Greek tragedy and as recent as contemporary novels, memoirs, and mystery novels. Thecumulative result is arresting: there are "killer wives" and crimes against trees; a government bureaucrat who sends political adversaries to their death for treason before falling to the same fate himself; a convicted murderer who doesn't die when hanged; a psychopathogical collector whose quitesane kidnapping victim nevertheless also collects; Justice Thomas' reading and misreading of Bigger Thomas; a man who forgives his son's murderer and one who cannot forgive his wife's non-existent adultery; fictional detectives who draw on historical analysis to solve murders. These essays begin aconversation, and they illustrate the great depth and power of crime in literature.

Vasconselos

“The Image of Spain in American Literature, 1815–1865.” Journal of Inter-American Studies 4.2 (1962): 257–72. Grantham, Nancy. “Simms's Frontier: A Collision of Cultures.” In William Gilmore Simms and the American Frontier.

Vasconselos

The writings of William Gilmore Simms (1806–1870) provide a sweeping fictional portrait of the colonial and antebellum South in all of its regional diversity. Simms's account of the region is more comprehensive than that of any other author of his time; he treats the major intellectual and social issues of the South and depicts the bonds and tensions among all of its inhabitants. By the mid-1840s Simms's novels were so well known that Edgar Allan Poe could call him "the best novelist which this country has, on the whole, produced." Perhaps the darkest of Simms's novel-length works, Vasconselos (1853) presents a fictionalized account of one of the first European efforts to settle the land that would become the United States, the Hernando de Soto expedition of 1539. Set largely in Havana, Cuba, as the explorers prepare to embark, the work explores such themes as the marginalization of racial and national minorities, the historical abuse of women, and the tendency of absolute power to corrupt absolutely. In addition, Simms anticipates in this colonial romance the works of renowned scholars who would follow him, including the historian Frederick Jackson Turner and the entire formal scholarly field of psychology, which would take shape only long after the author's death.