Titanic

Women and Children First

Titanic

A commemoration of the women and children involved in the tragedy of the sinking of the Titanic. The book is concerned with how they were a microcosm of society at the turn of the century when survival in life, as on this doomed ship, depended much too often on social class. Each passenger section - first, second and third class - is introduced with a brief overview on the conventions of post-Edwardian society. Included are personal interviews with survivors and their relatives; the passengers' own voices as recorded in diaries, letters and newspapers; biographies of the women and children, and male passengers or crew with whom they had contact; photographs of artefacts, where possible linked to their owners; period postcards, advertisements and photographs, together with Titanic sales brochures, tickets and baggage checks. There is also a passenger list, a chart of women and children who were saved or perished, and Titanic-related addresses.

Women and Children First

Sinking of the Titanic

Women and Children First

The events surrounding the sinking of the Titanic did not look the same to everyone involved. Step back in time and into the shoes of a crewmember, a first-class passenger, and a steerage passenger as readers act out scenes that took place in the midst of this historic event. Written with simplified, considerate text to help struggling readers, books in this series are made to build confidence as readers engage and read aloud. This book includes a table of contents, glossary, index, author biography, sidebars, and timelines.

Women and Children First

Feminism, Rhetoric, and Public Policy

Women and Children First

A critique of public policy rhetoric from multiple feminist perspectives.

Women & children first

a provocative look at modern Canadian women at work and at home

Women & children first

A provocative look at modern Canadian women at work and at home.

Women and Children First

The Life and Times of Elsie Wilcox of Kaua ?i

Women and Children First

Historian Gerda Lerner posed the question: What would history be like if seen through the eyes of women? In this insightful and sympathetic look at Hawaii's first female territorial senator, Elsie Wilcox (1874-1954), Judith Dean Gething Hughes adapts Lerner's question to tell the story of a remarkable woman whose life reflects key aspects of the history of modern Hawaii: the enormous impact of nineteenth-century missionaries and of the sugar plantations, which dominated Hawaii's economy for nearly a century after the Civil War; the powerful influence of the American progressive movement in public education and social welfare; and the onset of the "bloodless revolution" of the 1950s, which replaced the Caucasian Republican oligarchy with a Democratic party led by second-generation Asian Americans. The grandchild of missionaries and the niece of a prosperous Kauai sugar planter, Wilcox was born and raised on her uncle's plantation. Unlike many of her peers, however, Wilcox did not marry but pursued a full-time career as an advocate for change, including education, improved health, and full participation in the life of the community for second-generation Asian Americans. Hughes looks to Wilcox's missionary heritage to reveal the values that shaped her character and to her education at Wellesley College, which transformed her into a Progressive and, by the standards of the early twentieth century, a feminist. Hughes argues that although Wilcox's education and prominent social standing contributed to making her an "old maid," they also enabled her to serve as Kauai's commissioner for education for twelve years until her election to the territorial Senate in 1932 and 1936. There she established herself as the Senate's conscience on women's and children's issues and played a key role in creating Hawaii's social security laws. Women and Children First not only details the life of one of Hawaii's most dedicated social reformers but also provides insights into the historical development of Kauai and Hawaii in general from 1910 to 1940.

Women and Children First

Women and Children First

Praise for Gill Paul:'A cleverly crafted novel and an enthralling story... A triumph.' DINAH JEFFERIES'Gripping, romantic and evocative of its time.' LULU TAYLORIt is 1912. Against all odds, the Titanic is sinking.As desperate hands emerge from the icy water, a few lucky row boats float in the darkness. On the boats are four survivors. Reg, a handsome young steward working in the first-class dining room; Annie, an Irishwoman travelling to America with her children; Juliet, a titled English lady who is pregnant and unmarried, and George, a troubled American millionaire. In the wake of the tragedy, each of these people must try to rebuild their lives.But how can life ever be the same again when you've heard over a thousand people dying in the water around you? Haunting, emotional and beautifully written, Women and Children First breathes fresh life into the most famous disaster of the 20th century. A gripping read from the bestselling author of The Secret Wife.

Poverty in the American Dream

Women & Children First

Poverty in the American Dream

Analyzes the impact of social service cutbacks, changes in the job market, and victim-blaming myths like the Black matriarchy theses of Daniel Patrick Moynihan and George Gilder.

Women and Children First

The Horrible Hartford Circus Fire

Women and Children First


Women and Children First

Women and Children First

At a crucial time in American history, narratives of women in command or imperiled at sea contributed to the construction of a national rhetoric. Robin Miskolcze makes her case by way of careful readings of images of women at sea before the Civil War in her book Women and Children First. Though the sea has traditionally been interpreted as the province of men, women have gone to sea as mothers, wives, figureheads, and slaves. In fact, in the nineteenth century, women at sea contributed to the formation of an ethics of survival that helped to define American ideals. This study examines, often for the first time, images of women at sea in antebellum narratives ranging from novels and sermons to newspaper accounts and lithographs. Anglo-American women in antebellum sea narratives are often portrayed as models of American ideals derived from women’s seemingly innate Christian self-sacrifice. Miskolcze argues that these ideals, in conjunction with the maritime directive of “women and children first” during sea disasters, in turn defined a new masculine individualism, one that was morally minded, rooted in Christian principles, and dedicated to preserving virtue. Further, Miskolcze contends that without the antebellum sea narratives portraying the Christian self-sacrifice of women, the abolitionist cause would have suffered. African American women appealed to the directive of “women and children first” to make manifest their own womanhood, and by extension, their own humanity.