Women Making Music

We need not accept the private sphere as the only proper one for women's musicality in order to acknowledge the considerable skill and dedication many women over centuries have devoted to making music within it .

Women Making Music

"Do look after my music!" Irene Wienawska Polowski exclaimed before her death in 1932. And from the urgency of that sentiment the authors here have taken their cue to reveal and "look after" the previously neglected contributions of women throughout the history of Western art music. The first work of its kind, Women Making Music presents biographies of outstanding performers and composers, as well as analyses of women musicians as a class, and provides examples of music from all periods including medieval chant, Renaissance song, Baroque opera, German lieder, and twentieth-century composition. Unlike most standard historical surveys, the book not only sheds light upon the musical achievements of women, it also illuminates the historical contexts that shaped and defined those achievements.

Girls Rock Fifty Years of Women Making Music

THE WOMEN'S MUSIC MOVEMENT A movement requires passion , audacity and action — a Women's Music movement requires women inspired into action by other women through and in music . Folded into that is a chosen commitment to serve a ...

Girls Rock  Fifty Years of Women Making Music

Girls Rock! explores the many ways women have defined themselves as rock musicians in an industry once dominated and controlled by men. Integrating history, feminist analysis, and developmental theory, the authors describe how and why women have become rock musicians―what inspires them to play and perform, how they write, what their music means to them, and what they hope their music means to listeners. As these musicians tell their stories, topics emerge that illuminate broader trends in rock's history. From Wanda Jackson's revolutionary act of picking up a guitar to the current success of independent artists such as Ani DiFranco, Girls Rock! examines the shared threads of these performers' lives and the evolution of women's roles in rock music since its beginnings in the 1950s. This provocative investigation of women in rock is based on numerous interviews with a broad spectrum of women performers―those who have achieved fame and those just starting bands, those playing at local coffeehouses and those selling out huge arenas. Girls Rock! celebrates what female musicians have to teach about their experiences as women, artists, and rock musicians.

Women Music Educators in the United States

Jane Bowers and Judith Tick, eds., Women MakingMusic: The Western Art Tra- dition, 1150–1950 (Urbana and Chicago: ... Robert Tallant Laudon, “Carlyle McRoberts Scott and Verna Golden Scott: Builders of Minnesota Music” (manuscript in ...

Women Music Educators in the United States

Although women have been teaching and performing music for centuries, their stories are often missing from traditional accounts of the history of music education. In Women Music Educators in the United States: A History, Sondra Wieland Howe provides a comprehensive narrative of women teaching music in the United States from colonial days until the end of the twentieth century. Defining music education broadly to include home, community, and institutional settings, Howe draws on sources from musicology, the history of education, and social history to offer a new perspective on the topic.

British Women Composers and Instrumental Chamber Music in the Early Twentieth Century

Bernstein, Jane, '“Shout Shout Up With Your Song!'' Dame Ethel Smyth and the Changing Role of the British Woman Composer', in Jane Bowers and Judith Tick (eds), Women Making Music (New York: Macmillan Press, 1986).

British Women Composers and Instrumental Chamber Music in the Early Twentieth Century

This is the first full-length study of British women's instrumental chamber music in the early twentieth century. Laura Seddon argues that the Cobbett competitions, instigated by Walter Willson Cobbett in 1905, and the formation of the Society of Women Musicians in 1911 contributed to the explosion of instrumental music written by women in this period and highlighted women's place in British musical society in the years leading up to and during the First World War. Seddon investigates the relationship between Cobbett, the Society of Women Musicians and women composers themselves. The book’s six case studies - of Adela Maddison (1866-1929), Ethel Smyth (1858-1944), Morfydd Owen (1891-1918), Ethel Barns (1880-1948), Alice Verne-Bredt (1868-1958) and Susan Spain-Dunk (1880-1962) - offer valuable insight into the women’s musical education and compositional careers. Seddon’s discussion of their chamber works for differing instrumental combinations includes an exploration of formal procedures, an issue much discussed by contemporary sources. The individual composers' reactions to the debate instigated by the Society of Women Musicians, on the future of women's music, is considered in relation to their lives, careers and the chamber music itself. As the composers in this study were not a cohesive group, creatively or ideologically, the book draws on primary sources, as well as the writings of contemporary commentators, to assess the legacy of the chamber works produced.

Unbinding Gentility

A fascinating collective portrait of women's artistic and personal lives, Unbinding Gentility challenges entrenched assumptions about nineteenth century music and the experiences of the southern women who made it.

Unbinding Gentility

Hearing southern women in the pauses of history Southern women of all classes, races, and walks of life practiced music during and after the Civil War. Candace L. Bailey examines the history of southern women through the lens of these musical pursuits, uncovering the ways that music's transmission, education, circulation, and repertory help us understand its meaning in the women's culture of the time. Bailey pays particular attention to the space between music as an ideal accomplishment—part of how people expected women to perform gentility—and a real practice—what women actually did. At the same time, her ethnographic reading of binder’s volumes, letters and diaries, and a wealth of other archival material informs new and vital interpretations of women’s place in southern culture. A fascinating collective portrait of women's artistic and personal lives, Unbinding Gentility challenges entrenched assumptions about nineteenth century music and the experiences of the southern women who made it.

Women Composers and Music Technology in the United States

This book is the most definitive attempt to date to discuss the achievements of women as composers of experimental and avant-garde music from the 1930s to the present day.

Women Composers and Music Technology in the United States

This book is the most definitive attempt to date to discuss the achievements of women as composers of experimental and avant-garde music from the 1930s to the present day. Using a wealth of primary material, it also explores currently relevant issues in gender and technology. Drawing out the relationships between composers and their working environments, and between teachers and students, Elizabeth Hinkle-Turner discusses the contribution of women composers to electroacoustic music. The book includes a bibliography and discography covering the work of ninety composers.

Making the Scene

Judith Tick , “ Passed Away Is the Little Piano Girl , ” in Bowers and Tick , eds . , Women Making Music , 327. Green notes that while female singers are in tune with their bodies , for female instrumentalists “ the instrument which she ...

Making the Scene

Challenges conventional jazz historiography by demonstrating the role of big bands in the development of jazz. This book describes how jazz musicians found big bands valuable. It explores the rehearsal band scene in New York and rise of orchestras. It combines historical research, ethnography, and participant observation with musical analysis.

Women s Voices Across Musical Worlds

The book she co-edited with Jane Bowers, Women Making Music: The Western Art Tradition, 1150-1950, has become a classic in the field. And her award-winning biography of Ruth Crawford Seeger serves as an inspiration to us all.

Women s Voices Across Musical Worlds

This eclectic collection of original essays explores women's musical activities and expressions from the twelfth century to the present

Making Music in Selznick s Hollywood

Another facet of Little Women's music connects both with Alcott's novel and Selznick's later work. Steiner's theme for Jo—later published separately as “Josephine”—is an expertly pitched evocation of nineteenth-century parlor music.

Making Music in Selznick s Hollywood

This book tells the fascinating story of the evolution of David O. Selznick's style through the many artists whose work defined Hollywood sound.

Women Making Shakespeare

usual for YMCA huts, the Shakespeare Hut included more formal weekly productions: a mixture of dramatic recitals, musical interludes and play extracts. In the style of pre-war suffrage productions, the performances' format was an ...

Women Making Shakespeare

Women Making Shakespeare presents a series of 20-25 short essays that draw on a variety of resources, including interviews with directors, actors, and other performance practitioners, to explore the place (or constitutive absence) of women in the Shakespearean text and in the history of Shakespearean reception - the many ways women, working individually or in communities, have shaped and transformed the reception, performance, and teaching of Shakespeare from the 17th century to the present. The book highlights the essential role Shakespeare's texts have played in the historical development of feminism. Rather than a traditional collection of essays, Women Making Shakespeare brings together materials from diverse resources and uses diverse research methods to create something new and transformative. Among the many women's interactions with Shakespeare to be considered are acting (whether on the professional stage, in film, on lecture tours, or in staged readings), editing, teaching, academic writing, and recycling through adaptations and appropriations (film, novels, poems, plays, visual arts).

Girls Rock

Girls Rock! celebrates what female musicians have to teach about their experiences as women, artists, and rock musicians.

Girls Rock

With a foreword by Jennifer Baumgardner and Amy Richards Girls Rock! explores the many ways women have defined themselves as rock musicians in an industry once dominated and controlled by men. Integrating history, feminist analysis, and developmental theory, the authors describe how and why women have become rock musicians -- what inspires them to play and perform, how they write, what their music means to them, and what they hope their music means to listeners. As these musicians tell their stories, topics emerge that illuminate broader trends in rock's history. From Wanda Jackson's revolutionary act of picking up a guitar to the current success of independent artists such as Ani DiFranco, Girls Rock! examines the shared threads of these performers' lives and the evolution of women's roles in rock music since its beginnings in the 1950s. This provocative investigation of women in rock is based on numerous interviews with a broad spectrum of women performers -- those who have achieved fame and those just starting bands, those playing at local coffeehouses and those selling out huge arenas. Girls Rock! celebrates what female musicians have to teach about their experiences as women, artists, and rock musicians.

Focus Music in Contemporary Japan

This socioeconomic situation also leaves more space for these women to assume jobs as mixers and stagehands; positions dominated by men in other more mainstream levels of music making. Women are usually not employed in such positions at ...

Focus  Music in Contemporary Japan

Focus: Music in Contemporary Japan explores a diversity of musics performed in Japan today, ranging from folk song to classical music, the songs of geisha to the screaming of underground rock, with a specific look at the increasingly popular world of taiko (ensemble drumming). Discussion of contemporary musical practice is situated within broader frames of musical and sociopolitical history, processes of globalization and cosmopolitanism, and the continued search for Japanese identity through artistic expression. It explores how the Japanese have long negotiated cultural identity through musical practice in three parts: Part I, "Japanese Music and Culture," provides an overview of the key characteristics of Japanese culture that inform musical performance, such as the attitude towards the natural environment, changes in ruling powers, dominant religious forms, and historical processes of cultural exchange. Part II, "Sounding Japan," describes the elements that distinguish traditional Japanese music and then explores how music has changed in the modern era under the influence of Western music and ideology. Part III, "Focusing In: Identity, Meaning and Japanese Drumming in Kyoto," is based on fieldwork with musicians and explores the position of Japanese drumming within Kyoto. It focuses on four case studies that paint a vivid picture of each respective site, the music that is practiced, and the pedagogy and creative processes of each group. The accompanying CD includes examples of Japanese music that illustrate specific elements and key genres introduced in the text. A companion website includes additional audio-visual sources discussed in detail in the text. Jennifer Milioto Matsue is an Associate Professor at Union College and specializes in modern Japanese music and culture.

Popular Music Gender and Postmodernism

If women making music derived from punk do have something in common, for all their diversity, my listening to them en masse was a big mistake nonetheless. The problem was not just that the more strident performers wear thin, though, ...

Popular Music  Gender and Postmodernism

The migration of cynical academic ideas about postmodernism into music journalism are traced in this book. The result of this migration is a widespread fatalism over the ability of the music industry to absorb any expression of defiance in popular music. The book synthesizes a number of fields: American and British academic and journalistic music criticism; aesthetic and literary history and theory from romanticism through postmodernism; alternative music such as feminist punk and grunge; political economy, which has fueled the obsession with commercial incorporation; and subcultural sociology.

Rethinking Difference in Music Scholarship

and critical methods.88 (Not incidentally, these decades also saw increasing numbers of women entering the field ... 88 Jane Bowers and Judith Tick, ed., Women Making Music: The Western Art Tradition, 1150–1950 (Urbana: University of ...

Rethinking Difference in Music Scholarship

This major essay collection takes a fresh look at how differences among people matter for music and musical thought.

The Woman Composer

'Feminist Scholarship and the Field of Musicology', College Music Symposium, 29 (1989), 81–92. Bowers, Jane and Judith Tick (eds). Women Making Music: The Western Art Tradition 1150–1950 (Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press ...

The Woman Composer

Unlike previous anthologizing examinations of women and musical composition, this book concentrates on the reasons why there have been, and continue to be, so few women composers. Jill Halstead focuses on the experiences of nine composers born in the twentieth century (Avril Coleridge Taylor, Grace Williams, Elizabeth Maconchy, Minna Keal, Ruth Gipps, Antoinette Kirkwood, Enid Luff, Judith Bailey and Bryony Jagger) to explore the physiological, social and political factors that have inhibited women from pursuing careers as composers. Is there a biological argument for inferior female creativity? Do social structures, such as marriage, serve to restrict potential women composers? Is the gender of a composer reflected in the music they write? If so, how would this manifest itself? The conclusions that are reached are as complex and challenging as the questions that are raised. This powerful and provocative book aims to open up debate on these issues, which have all too often be avoided by critics and musicologists whose writings have perpetuated arguments that denigrate women's ability to compose. By confronting these arguments, this study will hopefully begin a reassessment of attitudes towards women and music, so that women composers are less of a rarity by the end of the next century.

A Guide to Library Research in Music

If your interest is in how women have fared in making music rather than expressions representing women within musical compositions, you probably won't use this subject heading. Look up the suggested heading instead: Women musicians (may ...

A Guide to Library Research in Music

A Guide to Library Research in Music introduces the process and techniques for researching and writing about music. This informative textbook provides concrete examples of different types of writing, offering a thorough introduction to music literature. It clearly describes various information-searching techniques and library-based organizational systems and introduces the array of music resources available. Each chapter concludes with learning exercises to aid the students' concept application and skill development. Appendixes provide short cuts to specific topics in library organizational systems, including Library of Congress Subject Headings and Classification. The concluding bibliography provides a quick overview of music literature and resources, emphasizing electronic and print publications since 2000, but including standard references that all music researchers should know.

Popular Music The Key Concepts

Fifty Years of Women Making Music, Lexington, KY: The University Press of Kentucky. Hawkins, S. (2009) The British Pop Dandy. Masculinity, Popular Music and Culture, Basingstoke: Ashgate. McClary, S. (1991) Feminine Endings: Music, ...

Popular Music  The Key Concepts

Now in an updated fourth edition, this popular A-Z student handbook provides a comprehensive survey of key ideas and concepts in popular music culture. With new and expanded entries on genres and subgenres, the text comprehensively examines the social and cultural aspects of popular music, taking into account the digital music revolution and changes in the way that music is manufactured, marketed and delivered. New and updated entries include: Age and youth Black music Digital music culture K-Pop Mash-ups Philadelphia Soul Pub music Religion and spirituality Remix Southern Soul Streaming Vinyl With further reading and listening included throughout, Popular Music: The Key Concepts is an essential reference text for all students studying the social and cultural dimensions of popular music.

Music and Gender in English Renaissance Drama

The Musical Times 145 (2004): 75–84. Mendelson, Sara, and Patricia Crawford. Women in ... In Women Making Music: The Western Art Tradition, 1150–1950, edited by Jane Bowers and Judith Tick, 90–115. Basingstoke: Macmillan Press Music ...

Music and Gender in English Renaissance Drama

This book offers a survey of how female and male characters in English Renaissance theatre participated and interacted in musical activities, both inside and outside the contemporary societal decorum. Wong’s analysis broadens our understanding of the general theatrical representation of music, or musical dramaturgy, and complicates the current discussion of musical portrayal and construction of gender during this period. Wong discusses dramaturgical meanings of music and its association with gender, love, and erotomania in Renaissance plays. The negotiation between the dichotomous qualities of the heavenly and the demonic finds extensive application in recent studies of music in early modern English plays. However, while ideological dualities identified in music in traditional Renaissance thinking may seem unequivocal, various musical representations of characters and situations in early modern drama would prove otherwise. Wong, building upon the conventional model of binarism, explores how playwrights created their musical characters and scenarios according to the received cultural use and perception of music, and, at the same time, experimented with the multivalent meanings and significance embodied in theatrical music.