Women of Devotion Through the Centuries

An inspiring survey of the long tradition of devotional writing and the deeply spiritual women who wrote it.

Women of Devotion Through the Centuries

An inspiring survey of the long tradition of devotional writing and the deeply spiritual women who wrote it.

Counterculture Through the Ages

The historical record numbers the troubadours at about four hundred individuals who lived during the two-century span known as the High Middle Ages. The troubadours expressed their worship of womankind by writing songs directed at :1 ...

Counterculture Through the Ages

As long as there has been culture, there has been counterculture. At times it moves deep below the surface of things, a stealth mode of being all but invisible to the dominant paradigm; at other times it’s in plain sight, challenging the status quo; and at still other times it erupts in a fiery burst of creative–or destructive–energy to change the world forever. But until now the countercultural phenomenon has been one of history’s great blind spots. Individual countercultures have been explored, but never before has a book set out to demonstrate the recurring nature of counterculturalism across all times and societies, and to illustrate its dynamic role in the continuous evolution of human values and cultures. Countercultural pundit and cyberguru R. U. Sirius brilliantly sets the record straight in this colorful, anecdotal, and wide-ranging study based on ideas developed by the late Timothy Leary with Dan Joy. With a distinctive mix of scholarly erudition and gonzo passion, Sirius and Joy identify the distinguishing characteristics of countercultures, delving into history and myth to establish beyond doubt that, for all their surface differences, countercultures share important underlying principles: individualism, anti-authoritarianism, and a belief in the possibility of personal and social transformation. Ranging from the Socratic counterculture of ancient Athens and the outsider movements of Judaism, which left indelible marks on Western culture, to the Taoist, Sufi, and Zen Buddhist countercultures, which were equally influential in the East, to the famous countercultural moments of the last century–Paris in the twenties, Haight-Ashbury in the sixties, Tropicalismo, women’s liberation, punk rock–to the cutting-edge countercultures of the twenty-first century, which combine science, art, music, technology, politics, and religion in astonishing (and sometimes disturbing) new ways, Counterculture Through the Ages is an indispensable guidebook to where we’ve been . . . and where we’re going.

Worthy Women of Our First Century

His biographers have given an account of the gay wedding - journey of over a hundred miles , from the bride's home ... must have been great indeed , for never was a wife loved with more passionate devotion than she was by Jefferson .

Worthy Women of Our First Century

Mrs. T.M. Randolph -- Mrs. Philip Schuyler -- Mrs. Samuel Ripley -- Women of New Hampshire -- Mrs. Rebecca Motte -- Deborah Logan.

Law Sensibility and the Sublime in Eighteenth Century Women s Fiction

In chapter one of The Monk, Antonia is unveiled by her wouldbe seducer so as to expose to his, and the reader's, gaze her physical ... Ellena is a flesh and blood woman who indulges in a 'devotion almost saintly', but who, after prayer, ...

Law  Sensibility and the Sublime in Eighteenth Century Women s Fiction

This work offers, firstly, a fresh historical, philosophical and cultural interpretation of the relation between the eighteenth-century discourse of sensibility, the sublime, and the theory and practice of eighteenth-century law. Secondly, the work exposes and explores the influence of this combination of discourses upon the formation of gender identities in this period. The author argues that it is only through a study of the convergence of these key eighteenth-century discourses that changing conceptualisations of femininity can fully be understood. Thirdly, it examines the presence, within eighteenth-century fiction by women, of a new female subject. Novels by women in this period, Chaplin posits, begin to reveal that the female subject position constructed through the discourses of law, sensibility and the sublime gives rise, for women, to a feminine ontological crisis that may be seen to anticipate by two hundred years the trauma of the 'post modern' male subject unable to present a unified subjectivity to himself or to the world. This feminine crisis finds expression within a range of female fiction of the mid-to-late eighteenth century - in Charlotte Lennox's anti-romance satire, Frances Sheridan's 'conduct-book' novels, the Gothic romances of Radcliffe and Eliza Fenwick and the sensationalistic horror fiction of Charlotte Dacre. Concentrating upon these writers, Chaplin argues that their works 'speak of dread' on behalf of women in this period and to varying degrees challenge discourses that construct femininity as a highly unstable, barely tenable subject position. Combining the works of Lyotard and Irigaray to formulate a new feminist reading of the eighteenth-century discourse of the sublime, this study offers fresh insights into the culture and politics of the eighteenth century. It presents highly original readings of well-known and lesser-known literary texts that interrogate from fresh perspectives the complex theoretical issues pertaining to

Recovering Nineteenth Century Women Interpreters of the Bible

By the nineteenth century, the ideal of female virtue included such notions as submission, Christian piety, and moral sensibility. There was a growing recognition that women were well-suited for religious devotion, and they were often ...

Recovering Nineteenth Century Women Interpreters of the Bible

Women have been thoughtful readers and interpreters of scripture throughout the ages, yet the usual history of biblical interpretation includes few women’s voices. To introduce readers to this untapped source for the history of biblical interpretation, this volume presents forgotten works from the nineteenth century written by women—including Grace Aguilar, Florence Nightingale, and Harriet Beecher Stowe, among others—from various faith backgrounds, countries, and social classes engaging contemporary biblical scholarship. Due to their exclusion from the academy, women’s interpretive writings addressed primarily a nonscholarly audience and were written in a variety of genres: novels and poetry, catechisms, manuals for Bible study, and commentaries on the books of the Bible. To recover these nineteenth-century women interpreters of the Bible, each essay in this volume locates a female author in her historical, ecclesiastical, and interpretive context, focusing on particular biblical passages to clarify an author’s contributions as well as to explore how her reading of the text was shaped by her experience as a woman.

Women s Lives Women s Rituals in the Hindu Tradition

this background, look more closely at three topics: the role of a ninth-century woman poet-saint in inspiring public expressions of ... But while this freedom to publicly portray devotion through the performing arts is seen as laudable, ...

Women s Lives  Women s Rituals in the Hindu Tradition

In this book, Tracy Pintchman has assembled ten leading scholars of Hinduism to explore the complex relationship between Hindu women's rituals and their lives beyond ritual. The book focuses particularly on the relationship of women's ritual practices to domesticity, exposing and exploring the nuances, complexities, and limits of this relationship. In many cultural and historical contexts, including contemporary India, women's everyday lives tend to revolve heavily around domestic and interpersonal concerns, especially care for children, the home, husbands, and other relatives. Hence, women's religiosity also tends to emphasize the domestic realm and the relationships most central to women. But women's religious concerns certainly extend beyond domesticity. Furthermore, even the domestic religious activities that Hindu women perform may not merely replicate or affirm traditionally formulated domestic ideals but may function strategically to reconfigure, reinterpret, criticize, or even reject such ideals. This volume takes a fresh look at issues of the relationship between Hindu women's ritual practices and normative domesticity. In so doing, it emphasizes female innovation and agency in constituting and transforming both ritual and the domestic realm and calls attention to the limitations of normative domesticity as a category relevant to many forms of Hindu women's religious practice.

Women s Utopias of the Eighteenth Century

in 1686 ) and the Port Royal School , founded by a woman during the thirteenth century.55 In its modern incarnation the Port Royal School was apparently influenced by Geert Groote's Modern Devotion.56 Although the movement spawned the ...

Women s Utopias of the Eighteenth Century

No human society has ever been perfect, a fact that has led thinkers as far back as Plato and St. Augustine to conceive of utopias both as a fanciful means of escape from an imperfect reality and as a useful tool with which to design improvements upon it. The most studied utopias have been proposed by men, but during the eighteenth century a group of reform-oriented female novelists put forth a series of work that expressed their views of, and their reservations about, ideal societies. In Women's Utopias of the Eighteenth Century, Alessa Johns examines the utopian communities envisaged by Mary Astell, Sarah Fielding, Mary Hamilton, Sarah Scott, and other writers from Britain and continental Europe, uncovering the ways in which they resembled--and departed from--traditional utopias. Johns demonstrates that while traditional visions tended to look back to absolutist models, women's utopias quickly incorporated emerging liberal ideas that allowed far more room for personal initiative and gave agency to groups that were not culturally dominant, such as the female writers themselves. Women's utopias, Johns argues, were reproductive in nature. They had the potential to reimagine and perpetuate themselves.

Women of the Century

can . cessful , partly by the firing of arrows so prepared as to set fire to the shingles of the roof ; and those ... with his spirits cheered and brightened by this touching proof of woman's devotion to the cause of her country .

Women of the Century


Encyclopaedia of Gender Equality Through Women Empowerment

and public life ; yet , over the centuries , their situation changed adversely . ... and puranic schools , which came to prominence by 500 A.D. and stressed devotion and faith , amply provided for women's emotional and religious needs .

Encyclopaedia of Gender Equality Through Women Empowerment

This Set Has Provided An Objective Critique Of The Contradictions And Consequences Of The Development And Disparities. Tackling As It Does Varies Concers Which Are Of Growing Importance In Most Developing Countries, The Collection In These 2 Volumes Set Is Of Thought Provoking Critical Reviews/Papers/Articles From India And Abroad Which Would Appeal To A Wide Range Of Readers.

Women Poetry and Politics in Seventeenth Century Britain

Clarke comments trenchantly that 'the religious lyric as used by women would seem [in the Civil War period] to offer ... of Devotion in the English Revolution', in Literature and the English Civil War, edited by Healy and Sawday, pp.

Women  Poetry  and Politics in Seventeenth Century Britain

Women, Poetry, and Politics in Seventeenth-Century Britain offers a new account of women's engagement in the poetic and political cultures of seventeenth-century England and Scotland, based on poetry that was produced and circulated in manuscript. Katherine Philips is often regarded as the first in a cluster of women writers, including Margaret Cavendish and Aphra Behn, who were political, secular, literary, print-published, and renowned. Sarah C. E. Ross explores a new corpus of political poetry by women, offering detailed readings of Elizabeth Melville, Anne Southwell, Jane Cavendish, Hester Pulter, and Lucy Hutchinson, and making the compelling case that female political poetics emerge out of social and religious poetic modes and out of manuscript-based authorial practices. Situating each writer in her political and intellectual contexts, from early covenanting Scotland to Restoration England, this volume explores women's political articulation in the devotional lyric, biblical verse paraphrase, occasional verse, elegy, and emblem. For women, excluded from the public-political sphere, these rhetorically-modest genres and the figural language of poetry offered vital modes of political expression; and women of diverse affiliations use religious and social poetics, the tropes of family and household, and the genres of occasionality that proliferated in manuscript culture to imagine the state. Attending also to the transmission and reception of women's poetry in networks of varying reach, Sarah C. E. Ross reveals continuities and evolutions in women's relationship to politics and poetry, and identifies a female tradition of politicised poetry in manuscript spanning the decades before, during, and after the Civil Wars.

Daughters of America Or Women of the Century

can . cessful , partly by the firing of arrows so prepared as to set fire to the shingles of the roof ; and those ... with his spirits cheered and brightened by this touching proof of woman's devotion to the cause of her country .

Daughters of America  Or  Women of the Century

Written during the 19th century women's movement, this book provides biographical information on eminent women artists, physicians, reformers, and scientists.

A Woman of the Century

Theirs was a union of death ' in 1875 , during which time she was princi- heart and life , full of strength and blessing to both , pally absorbed in domestic duties and the care of a growing in tenderness and devotion .

A Woman of the Century


Creative Women of Korea The Fifteenth Through the Twentieth Centuries

The Fifteenth Through the Twentieth Centuries Young-Key Kim-Renaud. Munjong [r. ... One question that arises here is how to reconcile the strongly Confucian content of the Naehun with Sohye's personal devotion to Buddhism.

Creative Women of Korea  The Fifteenth Through the Twentieth Centuries

This book introduces important contributions in the humanities by a select group of traditional and modern Korean women, from the 15th through the 20th centuries. The literary and artistic works of these women are considered Korean classics, and the featured artists and writers range from a queen, to a courtesan, to a Buddhist nun, to unknown women of Korea. Although women's works were generally meant only to circulate among women, these creative expressions have caught the attention of literary and artistic connoisseurs. By bringing them to light, the book seeks to demonstrate how Korean women have tried to give their lives meaning over the ages through their very diverse, yet common artistic responses to the details and drama of everyday life in Confucian Korea. The stories of these women and their work give us glimpses of their personal views on culture, aesthetics, history, society, politics, morality, and more.

Jeremiah Through the Centuries

... “And at this day the case is the same with the Papists; for the devotion, or rather the diabolical madness, by which ... sacred prostitution and the ritual self‐dedication of young women to the god of fertility” (Bright 1964: 15).

Jeremiah Through the Centuries

Explores the interpretive history of the Book of Jeremiah, and highlights the various ways it has influenced the cultures in which it was read Jeremiah Through the Centuries explores the reception history of the sixth century B.C.E. prophet, providing original commentary on the texts and traditions that continue to deeply impact readers by exemplifying the spiritual struggle of the faithful. Focusing on the Book of Jeremiah, the text presents an original theory about the effects of Jeremiah on the developing idea of the self in Western history and culture, particularly over the last 400 years, in a wide range of liturgical, political, artistic, literary, and cultural contexts. The book guides readers through various interpretations of Jeremiah’s poetry and prose, discussing the profound influence that Jeremiah and Western culturehave had on each other through the centuries. Significant texts from every chapter of Jeremiah are presented in a chronological narrative as both conversation and debate—enabling readers to encounter the prophet in the text of the Bible, in previous interpretations, and in the context of their own lives. Throughout the text, the receptions reflect historical contexts and highlight the ways they shaped specific receptions of Jeremiah. This book: Illustrates how the Book of Jeremiah was adapted by readers to face new challenges, both in the past and present Includes examples of Jeremiah in social satire, Islamic tradition, political debate, and religious controversy Provides a detailed introduction that traces Jeremiah’s influence on events and traditions Offers insights into both celebrated texts and lesser-known passages that are relevant to contemporary readers Features numerous, previously unpublished, illustrations, demonstrating the influence of Jeremiah on traditions in Western art Featuring engaging narrative and expert commentary, Jeremiah Through the Centuries is ideal for students, teachers, and general readers with interest in theology and biblical studies, Judaic studies, ancient literature, cultural criticism, reception history of the Bible, and the history of Western civilization.

Women s Diaries as Narrative in the Nineteenth Century Novel

The surviving characters are made safe by Allan's marriage, and through Midwinter's devotion to his writing, they are released from Lydia and from the threat of the prophetic dream. Sensation is also created by the woman's being given a ...

Women s Diaries as Narrative in the Nineteenth Century Novel

Using private diary writing as her model, Catherine Delafield investigates the cultural significance of nineteenth-century women's writing and reading practices. Beginning with an examination of non-fictional diaries and the practice of diary-writing, she assesses the interaction between the fictional diary and other forms of literary production such as epistolary narrative, the periodical, the factual document and sensation fiction. The discrepancies between the private diary and its use as a narrative device are explored through the writings of Frances Burney, Elizabeth Gaskell, Anne Brontë, Dinah Craik, Wilkie Collins and Bram Stoker. The ideological function of the diary, Delafield suggests, produces a conflict in fictional narrative between that diary's received use as a domestic and spiritual record and its authority as a life-writing opportunity for women. Delafield considers women as writers, readers, and subjects and contextualizes her analysis within nineteenth-century reading practice. She demonstrates ways in which women could becomes performers of their own story through a narrative method which was authorized by their femininity and at the same time allowed them to challenge the myth of domestic womanhood.

Experimental Theology in America

Cheryl Forbes discusses Mrs. Cowman in the context of " daily devotionals ” as a genre of women's writing in Women of Devotion through the Centuries , 19-56 , and some details of my discussion are based on Forbes .

Experimental Theology in America

In this study of Madame Guyon and, her defender, Francois de Fénelon, the Archbishop of Cambray, Patricia Ward demonstrates how the ideas of these seventeenth-century Catholics were transmitted into an ongoing tradition of Protestant devotional literature--one that continues to influence American evangelicals and charismatic Christians today. Down a winding (and fascinating) historical path, Ward traces how the lives and writings of these two somewhat obscure Catholic believers in Quietism came to such prominence in American spirituality--offering, in part, a fascinating glance at the role of women in the history of devotional writing.

Women and Religion in the First Christian Centuries

It embodies perfect heterosexual love that triumphs even over death , and , as such , it supports the Greco ... cult as an attempt to endorse the family and the status quo of society , and women's devotion to it as their acquiescence .

Women and Religion in the First Christian Centuries

"Too often the religious traditions of antiquity are studied in isolation, without any real consideration of how they interacted. What made someone with a free choice become an adherent of one faith rather than another? Why might a former pagan choose to become a 'God-fearer' and attend synagogue services? Why might a Jew become a Christian? How did the mysteries of Mithras differ from the worship of the Unconquered Sun, or the status of the Virgin Mary from that of Isis, and how many gods could an ancient worshipper have? These questions are hard to answer without a synoptic view of what the different religions offered."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

The Working Life of Women in the Seventeenth Century

They depict women with an exalted devotion, supporting their families and strengthening their husbands through the storms of persecution and amidst the exacting claims of religion. John Banks wrote from Carlisle Prison in 164.8 to his ...

The Working Life of Women in the Seventeenth Century

First published in 1968. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Encyclopedia of British Writers 16th 17th and 18th Centuries

At Cambridge he was noteworthy for his fervent religious devotion, which he exhibited later in his poetry. ... By contemplating women's sorrow and devotion in “The Weeper,” about Mary Magdalene mourning for Christ at his crucifixion, ...

Encyclopedia of British Writers  16th  17th  and 18th Centuries

Presents a two-volume A to Z reference on English authors from the sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, providing information about major figures, key schools and genres, biographical information, author publications and some critical analyses.

Women and the Counter Reformation in Early Modern M nster

Ronnie Hsia has already noted the precipitous drop in devotion to the Virgin throughout the sixteenth century.54 This statement is also borne out by the sample of wills examined for this chapter. During the first half of the seventeenth ...

Women and the Counter Reformation in Early Modern M  nster

The first study of how women from different backgrounds encountered the Counter-Reformation in early sixteenth-century Münster.