Infertility

Moreover, this volume is an important contribution to the literature on fertility, women's health issues, and health psychology in general, all topics with which I have been closely involved over the past two decades.

Infertility

As a researcher whose work focuses largely on the causes and conse quences of unwanted pregnancy, I may appear to be an unlikely candidate to write a foreword to a book on infertility. Yet, many of the themes that emerge in the study of unwanted pregnancy are also apparent in the study of infertility. Moreover, this volume is an important contribution to the literature on fertility, women's health issues, and health psychology in general, all topics with which I have been closely involved over the past two decades. Neither pregnancy nor its absence is inherently desirable: The occurrence of a pregnancy can be met with joy or despair, and its absence can be a cause of relief or anguish. Whether or not these states are wanted, the conscious and unconscious meanings attached to pregnancy and in fertility, the responses of others, the perceived implications of these states, and one's expectations for the future all are critical factors in determining an individual's response. In addition, both unwanted pregnancy and failure to conceive can be socially stigmatized, evoking both overt and subtle social disapproval. Fur ther, they involve not only the woman, but her partner, and potentially the extended family. Finally, both of these reproductive issues have been poorly researched. Because both are emotionally charged and socially stigmatized events, they are difficult to study. Much of the early literature relied on anecdotal or case reports.

PCOS And Your Fertility

Will irregular periods stop me from getting pregnant? I've been trying for months – what next? Will fertility drugs help me? The good news is that no matter what stage you're at, this book can help.

PCOS And Your Fertility

Ever had irregular periods? Do you find you're always putting on weight? Do you feel tired and emotional ,and up one minute, down the next? Or do you struggle with adult acne, hair loss, or facial and body hair where you don't want it? You could have PCOS, a hormonal health condition that affects one in ten women in the UK – and is one of the most common causes of fertility problems. So if you do have PCOS, chances are you have questions about fertility buzzing around your head: Am I fertile? What can I do to boost my chances of pregnancy? Will irregular periods stop me from getting pregnant? I've been trying for months – what next? Will fertility drugs help me? The good news is that no matter what stage you're at, this book can help. Written by two women with PCOS at different stages of their fertility journeys, it will help you: • discover how and why PCOS can affect your fertility • find out from the experts and other women how they have overcome non-conception • make a step-by-step action plan to enhance your fertility • work out which fertility treatments are best for you.

Yes You Can Get Pregnant

This is the complete guide to getting pregnant and improving fertility naturally -- even if you've been told your chances of conception are low.

Yes  You Can Get Pregnant

This is the complete guide to getting pregnant and improving fertility naturally -- even if you've been told your chances of conception are low. A nationally renowned women's health and fertility expert, Aimee Raupp has helped thousands of women optimize their fertility and get pregnant. Now, in this book, she provides her complete program for improving your chances of conceiving and overcoming infertility, including the most effective complementary and lifestyle approaches, the latest nutritional advice, and ways to prepare yourself emotionally and spiritually.

The Effect of Psychosocial Factors on the Anxiety Level of Infertile Women

The same questionnaire was presented to a control group of 42 infertile women (M = 33.8 yrs. S.D. - 3.7) who were not presenting for IVF treatment and had no previous exposure about IVF treatment.

The Effect of Psychosocial Factors on the Anxiety Level of Infertile Women

(Uncorrected OCR) Abstract Illness perceptions was believed to be able to not only explain the variety of coping responses to the same illness but also be more directly related to such outcomes as adherence to medical treatment, emotional distress, and illness-related disability. Thus, an early exploration and identification of the infertile couples' perceptions of infertility offered the opportunity to minimize or avoid later difficulties in treatment or recommended behavior changes, and thus is essential for effective patient management. This saidy investigated the effect of illness perception and psychosocial factors on the anxiety level of the infertile women presenting for In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) treatment. One hundred and thirty infertile women in the experimental group (M = 34,3 yrs, S.D. = 3.5) were asked to complete a questionnaire measuring their state anxiety level before presenting for IVF treatment. The same questionnaire was presented to a control group of 42 infertile women (M = 33.8 yrs. S.D. - 3.7) who were not presenting for IVF treatment and had no previous exposure about IVF treatment. Pearson product-moment correlation and hierarchical multiple regression analysis were done on the data collected. The results showed that the infertile women's perception of the illness identity was significantly associated with their state anxiety level even after the effect of self esteem was accounted for. Future interventions aim at working on the intertile women's perception about their identity of self as infertile, the severity of the consequences of their illness and boosting up of their self-esteem could be associated with improvements on their psychological well-being, and hopefully their perception rate, when presenting for IVF treatment. Implication on an understanding for the infertile women's illness perception on future patient management was discussed.

Is Your Mind Fertility Friendly

This book will educate and offer self-help techniques to enable women to take back control of their fertility.

Is Your Mind Fertility Friendly

Fertility problems are one of the fastest growing areas of medicine, with failure to conceive causing immense pain and suffering for those looking to get pregnant. Due to increased media hype, many women are entering their thirties terrified that they will struggle to get pregnant. For many women, anxiety about fertility and their ticking body clock starts long before they get pregnant. Is Your Mind Fertility-Friendly? aims to help busy women become aware of the impact stress and negative emotions can have on the body, including the detrimental effects they can have on your fertility. Fertility expert Jackie Brown provides women with the essential information they need to overcome their stress and create the perfect environment to increase fertility. Although many women do not feel particularly stressed, emotions such as worry, anxiety, fear and anger can still evoke the stress response that can interfere with fertility. This book will educate and offer self-help techniques to enable women to take back control of their fertility. Inspired by books such as The Secret by Rhonda Byrne and Conquering Infertility by Dr. Alice Domar, this book is an essential read for those looking to understand fertility.

Fertility Demystified

Today, millions are affected by infertility issues. Fertility Demystified explores many common causes of infertility and outlines the latest treatments, guiding you toward successful conception.

Fertility Demystified

Your essential guide to FERTILITY options and reproductive HEALTH If you are trying to start a family but are having trouble conceiving, you are not alone. Today, millions are affected by infertility issues. Fertility Demystified explores many common causes of infertility and outlines the latest treatments, guiding you toward successful conception. Written by a board-certified obstetrician and gynecologist, Fertility Demystified begins with an overview of the different fertility concerns for men and women along with a discussion of the possible reasons for early pregnancy loss. You'll find methods for increasing the chances of becoming pregnant--both naturally and through fertility drug therapy--and explanations of the various assisted-reproduction technologies. Also, the complex emotional issues and ethical considerations in the decision-making process are carefully explored. This easy-to-understand guide offers: Explanations of health and lifestyle concerns for both men and women Tips for finding a fertility specialist Natural ways to monitor and improve your own fertility An overview of various fertility medications and their risks Emerging technologies not yet available in the United States Alternatives for the infertile couple--including surrogacy and adoption Straightforward and accessible, Fertility Demystified helps you make informed decisions about your fertility options.

The Intimate Self

An invaluable guide for women of all ages This book addresses every health concern that a woman may have about her body.

The Intimate Self

An invaluable guide for women of all ages This book addresses every health concern that a woman may have about her body. Beginning with an exhaustive description of the female anatomy, it discusses a variety of subjects—common and complex—related not only to a woman's body, but also to her emotional and psychological responses. Dr Shelly Batra, gynaecologist and leading expert on women's health, draws on twenty years of medical experience to demonstrate concrete steps that a woman can take towards identifying and solving her problems in order to lead a healthy and satisfying life. Full of interesting anecdotes, wise advice and shared experience, this book encourages every woman to be fully informed about her body and celebrate her potential. Supplemented with detailed illustrations, ‘The Intimate Self: A Guide to Women’s Sexual Health includes up-to-date information on: • Puberty, sex and contraception • Infertility • Menopause • Abortion and miscarriage • Effects of smoking and alcohol • Cancer risks

Infertility Comics and Graphic Medicine

The physical and psychological ordeals of infertility disrupt women's self-identity in multiple ways. Specifically, childless women “go through a process of 'taking on' an identity of 'self' as infertile” (Roudsari et al. 2014, 114).

Infertility Comics and Graphic Medicine

Infertility Comics and Graphic Medicine examines women’s graphic memoirs on infertility, foregrounding the complex interrelationship between women’s life writing, infertility studies, and graphic medicine. Through a scholarly examination of the artists’ use of visual-verbal codes of the comics medium in narrating their physical ordeals and affective challenges occasioned by infertility, the book seeks to foreground the intricacies of gender identity, embodiment, subjectivity, and illness experience. Providing long-overdue scholarly attention on the perspectives of autobiographical and comics studies, the authors examine the gendered nature of the infertility experience and the notion of motherhood as an ideological force which interpolates socio-cultural discourses, accentuating the potential of graphic medicine as a creative space for the infertile women to voice their hitherto silenced perspectives on childlessness with force and urgency. This interdisciplinary volume will be of interest to scholars and students in comics studies, the health humanities, literature, and women’s and gender studies, and will also be suitable for readers in visual studies and narrative medicine.

Religiosity Depression and Infertility Related Stress in Muslim Women Struggling with Infertility and Living in the West

Infertility is a deeply distressing experience that affects millions of women each year, with many also suffering from depression.

Religiosity  Depression  and Infertility Related Stress in Muslim Women Struggling with Infertility and Living in the West

Infertility is a deeply distressing experience that affects millions of women each year, with many also suffering from depression. Depression may increase the risk of experiencing infertility, and decrease the success rate of infertility treatment. Studies suggest that religiosity/spirituality (R/S) may be protective against depression; however, in the Western world these connections remain largely unexplored outside of Christian populations. This study sought to extend our understanding of the relationship between R/S, depression, and infertility-related stress among Muslim women struggling with infertility and living in a Western context. An ethnically diverse sample of 496 Muslim women residing in Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States with self-reported fertility problems was recruited using online platforms. Participants completed an online cross-sectional self-report survey consisting of a sociodemographics questionnaire, the Center of Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale - Revised (CESD-R), the Fertility Problem Inventory (FPI), the Brief RCOPE, and the Religious Commitment Inventory - 10 (RCI-10). As hypothesized, there was a significant and positive relationship between depression and infertility-related distress. While negative religious coping (NRC) was significantly related to depression and infertility-related stress, positive religious coping (PRC) and religious commitment were not. Findings may guide the development of interventions that improve mental health and increase chances of successful pregnancy among Muslim women with fertility problems. Implications for clinical applications and future research are discussed.

Pursuing Treatment for Fertility Problems

Infertility affects approximately 10%, or 6.1 million married women in the United States (CDC, 2011).

Pursuing Treatment for Fertility Problems

Infertility affects approximately 10%, or 6.1 million married women in the United States (CDC, 2011). African American, Hispanic, and other non-Caucasian women report higher rates of infertility, according to the National Center for Health Statistics (Abma, Chandra, Peterson, & Mosher, 1998). Despite attempts to ensure equal access to care, the majority of women using assisted reproductive technology (ART) services are non-Hispanic Caucasian (85.4%), while 5.4% are Hispanic women, 4.6% are non-Hispanic African American, 4.5% are Asian, and .1% are another ethnicity (Seifer, Frazier, & Grainger, 2008). Women of ethnic minorities, particularly Hispanic and African American women are less likely to receive ART and wait longer before seeking treatment. Factual differences exist in access to and use of infertility treatment by ethnic and cultural minorities in the US; yet, there is little research addressing this issue aside from that which examines financial reasons alone. Increased levels of depression prior to treatment have been correlated with treatment dropout (Eisenberg et al., 2010; Smeenk, Verhaak, Stolwijk, Kremer, & Braat, 2004), which could explain underutilization among minority women. Hypothesized social, cultural or religious barriers could account for this discrepancy as well, although limited literature exists about women's perception of these perceived barriers. This study aimed to elucidate perceived barriers to care among minority and non-minority women and to examine the association of depression, social support, and these barriers with not pursuing or discontinuing treatment. A sample of 211 women with self-reported fertility problems was recruited from online social media outlets; these women completed a cross-sectional self-report online survey. Study measures included a demographic questionnaire; the Center of Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, Revised; the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List; the Measure of Perceived Barriers; and the Intent to Pursue Treatment Measure. Primary hypotheses predicted that social support would moderate the effect of depression on the intent to pursue treatment. Secondary hypotheses examined endorsed barriers, their severity, and the effect these variables had on the intent to pursue treatment. Tertiary hypotheses examined the differences between minority and non-minority women on barriers, severity of barriers, and the pursuit of non-medical treatment options. Results indicated a trend toward significance in the relationship between depression, social support, and the intent to pursue treatment among a subsample of women currently trying to conceive F (2,153) = 2.62, p = .076. Several barriers to care beyond financial burden were endorsed by a majority of women. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that barrier severity (a = 7.30, b = -.54, SE = .15, t = -3.66, p

Self Trust and Reproductive Autonomy

In this book Carolyn McLeod introduces to the reproductive ethics literature the idea that in reproductive health care women's self-trust can be undermined in ways that threaten their autonomy.

Self Trust and Reproductive Autonomy

A study of the importance of self-trust for women's autonomy in reproductive health. The power of new medical technologies, the cultural authority of physicians, and the gendered power dynamics of many patient-physician relationships can all inhibit women's reproductive freedom. Often these factors interfere with women's ability to trust themselves to choose and act in ways that are consistent with their own goals and values. In this book Carolyn McLeod introduces to the reproductive ethics literature the idea that in reproductive health care women's self-trust can be undermined in ways that threaten their autonomy. Understanding the importance of self-trust for autonomy, McLeod argues, is crucial to understanding the limits on women's reproductive freedom. McLeod brings feminist insights in philosophical moral psychology to reproductive ethics, and to health-care ethics more broadly. She identifies the social environments in which self-trust is formed and encouraged. She also shows how women's experiences of reproductive health care can enrich our understanding of self-trust and autonomy as philosophical concepts. The book's theoretical components are grounded in women's concrete experiences. The cases discussed, which involve miscarriage, infertility treatment, and prenatal diagnosis, show that what many women feel toward themselves in reproductive contexts is analogous to what we feel toward others when we trust or distrust them. McLeod also discusses what health-care providers can do to minimize the barriers to women's self-trust in reproductive health care, and why they have a duty to do so as part of their larger duty to respect patient autonomy.

Handbook of Psychology Health Psychology

When confronted with infertility , women often experience myriad affective responses , such as initial shock and denial ... and other women with children , for example ) , helplessness and perceived loss of control , and guilt or self ...

Handbook of Psychology  Health Psychology

Includes established theories and cutting-edge developments. Presents the work of an international group of experts. Presents the nature, origin, implications, an future course of major unresolved issues in the area.

Dilemma of Fertile Virgins

Dilemma of Fertile Virgins


Infertility

" Other sections of this book devote considerable attention to timely issues rarely dealt with in the professional literature, such as those surrounding reproduction among single women and same sex couples.

Infertility

Infertility: Psychological Issues and Counseling Strategies is a valuable reference for mental health professionals who treat individuals and couples grappling with the psychological and emotional strains of infertility and its treatment. Drawing upon their professional experiences as well as the current literature in the field, leading practitioners consider the differences in how women and men react to a diagnosis of infertility and describe strategies for helping individuals deal with the anxieties, feelings of inadequacy, and low self-esteem that can follow such a diagnosis. These experts examine the effects of infertility on love, sex, and other facets of a relationship and detail methods for helping couples resolve conflicts about infertility. They explore the latest findings on pregnancy-related stress and its possible somatic effects, and they describe effective stress management techniques. They offer practical guidelines for helping patients to cope with failed fertility treatments and manage the grief of a miscarriage. And they examine a wide range of clinical issues surrounding alternative routes to parenting, including adoption.