Love s Wounds

His collection of love poems extolling his Beloved, Laura, interspersed with political addresses and poems to friends, remains the cornerstone of his literary reputation in spite of his voluminous Latin works. In the lyric collection, ...

Love s Wounds

Love’s Wounds takes an in-depth look at the widespread language of violence and abjection in early modern European love poetry. Beginning in fourteenth-century Italy, this book shows how Petrarch established a pattern of inequality between suffering poet and exalted Beloved rooted in political parrhēsia. Sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century French and English poets reshaped his model into an idiom of extravagant brutality coded to their own historical circumstances. Cynthia N. Nazarian argues that these poets exaggerated the posture of the downtrodden lover, adapting the rhetoric of powerless desire to forge a new "countersovereignty" from within the heart of vulnerability—a potentially revolutionary position through which to challenge cultural, religious, and political authority. Creating a secular equivalent to the martyr, early modern sonneteers crafted a voice that was both critical and unstoppable because it suffered. Love’s Wounds tracks the development of the countersovereign voice from Francesco Petrarca to Maurice Scève, Joachim du Bellay, Théodore-Agrippa d’Aubigné, Edmund Spenser, and William Shakespeare. Through interdisciplinary and transnational analyses, Nazarian reads early modern sonnets as sites of contestation and collaboration and rewrites the relationship between early modern literary forms.

Love Wounds Never Heal

EAN WAS INTERNALLY HURT when Marie got pregnant with Allen, and that was alove wound thatnever healed, andhe could never trust a woman again to remarry. And perhaps if he had devoted his life to Marie, his wife, instead of to his mother ...

Love Wounds Never Heal

This story reflects the relationship between two young people who met and fell in love in a very short period of time and did not take the time to know more about each other mainly do to the circumstances and time table of events which you will read about in this story, they were thinking they would get married raise their children and live happily ever after, little did they know the problems they would encounter the involvement from members in the inter family which would lead to the breakdown of their marriage contributing to love wounds that never heal.

Wounds of Love

The mystic's lips suck the wound in Christ's side to drink directly from the source, to make contact with Christ's body, love, and suffering rather than with a mysterious, eucharist substitution. The themes of eucharistic ...

Wounds of Love

The Peruvian mystic St. Rose of Lima (Isabel Flores y Oliva, 1586-1617) was canonized in 1671 as the first saint of the New World and remains the object of widespread devotion today. In this engrossing new study, Frank Graziano uses the example of St. Rose to explore the meaning of female mysticism and the way in which saints are products of their cultures. Virginity, austerity, eucharistic devotion, incessant mortification, and mystical marriage to Christ characterized the devotional regimen that structured St. Rose's entire life. Many of her mystical practices echo the symptoms of such modern psychological disorders as masochism, depression, hysteria, and anorexia nervosa. Graziano offers a sophisticated argument not only for the origins and meaning of these behaviors in Rose's case, but also for the reason her culture venerated them as signs of sanctity. In the process he explores a wide range of themes, from the idea of suffering as an expression of love to the assimilation of childhood trauma through religious repetition. Graziano also offers a penetrating analysis of the politics of Rose's canonization. He finds that her mystical union with God--bypassing the institutional channels of sacrament and priestly mediation--was inherently subversive to the bureaucratized Church. Canonization was a cooptation by which Rose's competing claim to Christ was integrated into the Catholic canon. The book concludes with a fascinating exploration of mystical eroticism, with its intense experiences of vision and ecstasy. The eroticized suffering of many mystics is shown to be very human in origin: the mystic's wounded love is projected onto a God conceived to accommodate it. Wounds of Love is based on a decade of research in archives, rare books, and an extraordinary range of secondary sources. Introducing an innovative method that integrates history, cultural studies, psychoanalysis, and clinical psychology, this compelling work offers a bold new interpretation of female mysticism.

Spiritual Canticle of the Soul

This impression is most profound in the soul; for by the wound of love, made in the soul by God, the affections of the will lead most rapidly to the possession of the Beloved, whose touch it felt, and as rapidly also, His absence, ...

Spiritual Canticle of the Soul

** Active Table of Contents ** This book comes complete with a Touch-or-Click Table of Contents, divided by each section. This edition has a linked Table of Contents and has been wonderfully formatted (searchable and interlinked) to work on your e-book reader. The Spiritual Canticle, Cántico Espiritual, is one of the poetic works of the Spanish mystical poet St. John of the Cross. It is part of four works by John dealing with the so-called Dark Night of the Soul, when the individual Soul undergoes earthly and spiritual privations in search of union with God. Along with the other three, The Dark Night Of the Soul, The Living Flame of God and the Spiritual Canticle, it is regarded as one of the greatest works of mysticism in Christianity and in the Spanish language. You can purchase other religious works directly from Wyatt North Publishing.

The Secret Wound

That earst us held in love of lingring life ; Then hopelesse hartlesse , gan the cunning thiefe Perswade us die ... Both knights also suffer from the " wounds " of love , though Arthur's remains a " secret , " figurative wound ( " what ...

The Secret Wound

This book offers a new reading of early modern romance in the light of historically contemporary accounts of mind, and specifically the medical tradition of love-melancholy. The book argues that the medical profile of the melancholic lover provides an essential context for understanding the characteristic patterns of romance: narrative deferral, epistemological uncertainty, and the endless quest for a quasi-phantasmic beloved. Unlike many recent studies of romance, this book establishes a detailed historical basis for investigating the psychological structure of romance. Wells begins by tracing the development of the medical disorder first known in the Latin west as amor hereos (lovesickness) from its earliest roots in Greek and Arabic medicine to its translation into the Latin medical tradition. Drawing on this detailed historical material, the book considers three important early modern romances: Ariosto's Orlando Furioso, Tasso's Gerusalemme Liberata, and Spenser's The Faerie Queene, concluding with a brief consideration of the significance of this literary and medical legacy for Romanticism. Most broadly, the interdisciplinary nature of this study allows the author to investigate the central critical problem of early modern subjectivity in substantially new ways.

Ovid s Homer

Here, Venus uses the trope to ask him what he wants with the goddess of elegiac love now that he is engaged upon something greater. But the poet of the Fasti replies with words meant to remind her that wounds are not originally an ...

Ovid s Homer

Ovid's Homer examines the Latin poet's engagement with the Homeric poems throughout his career. Boyd offers detailed analysis of Ovid's reading and reinterpretation of a range of Homeric episodes and characters from both epics, and demonstrates the pervasive presence of Homer in Ovid's work. The resulting intertextuality, articulated as a poetics of paternity or a poetics of desire, is particularly marked in scenes that have a history of scholiastic interest or critical intervention; Ovid repeatedly asserts his mastery as Homeric reader and critic through his creative response to alternative readings, and in the process renews Homeric narrative for a sophisticated Roman readership. Boyd offers new insight into the dynamics of a literary tradition, illuminating a previously underappreciated aspect of Ovidian intertextuality.

The Works of the English Poets from Chaucer to Cowper

And bloodless wounds of love her vowes reliev'd . Like summer , goodly Gartha , fully blown ; She let no med'cinal fow'r in quiet grow , Laura , like autumn , with as ripe a look ; No art lie hid , nor artist ease his thought ...

The Works of the English Poets  from Chaucer to Cowper


God s Wounds Hermeneutic of the Christian Symbol of Divine Suffering Volume Two

In the first volume of this study, I identified and described the two major presuppositions of the Christian symbol of divine suffering, emblematically stated in the following condensed forms: (1) God is love; and (2) the human in the ...

God s Wounds  Hermeneutic of the Christian Symbol of Divine Suffering  Volume Two

This book constitutes the second volume of a three-volume study of Christian testimonies to divine suffering: God's Wounds: Hermeneutic of the Christian Symbol of Divine Suffering, vol. 2, Evil and Divine Suffering. The larger study focuses its inquiry into the testimonies to divine suffering themselves, seeking to allow the voices that attest to divine suffering to speak freely, then to discover and elucidate the internal logic or rationality of this family of testimonies, rather than defending these attestations against the dominant claims of classical Christian theism that have historically sought to eliminate such language altogether from Christian discourse about the nature and life of God. This second volume of studies proceeds on the basis of the presuppositions of this symbol, those implicit attestations that provide the conditions of possibility for divine suffering-that which constitutes divine vulnerability with respect to creation-as identified and examined in the first volume of this project: an understanding of God through the primary metaphor of love (God is love); and an understanding of the human as created in the image of God, with a life (though finite) analogous to the divine life-the imago Dei as love. The second volume then investigates the first two divine wounds or modes of divine suffering to which the larger family of testimonies to divine suffering normally attest: (1) divine grief, suffering because of betrayal by the beloved human or human sin; and (2) divine self-sacrifice, suffering for the beloved human in its bondage to sin or misery, to establish the possibility of redemption and reconciliation. Each divine wound, thus, constitutes a response to a creaturely occasion. The suffering in each divine wound also occurs in two stages: a passive stage and an active stage. In divine grief, God suffers because of human sin, betrayal of the divine lover by the beloved human: divine sorrow as the passive stage of divine grief; and divine anguish as the active stage of divine grief. In divine self-sacrifice, God suffers in response to the misery or bondage of the beloved human's infidelity: divine travail (focused on the divine incarnation in Jesus of Nazareth) as the active stage of divine self-sacrifice; and divine agony (focused on divine suffering in the crucifixion of Jesus of Nazareth) as the passive stage of divine self-sacrifice.

The Circuit of Apollo

Thus sought to heal the wounds that love has made, And temper bleeding sorrow's sharp excess! Ah! Not in vain she lends her balmy aid— The agonies she cannot cure, are less!67 The centrality of friendship in de la Tour's life is ...

The Circuit of Apollo

Written by a combination of established scholars and new critics in the field, the essays collected in Circuit of Apollo attest to the vital practice of commemorating women’s artistic and personal relationships. In doing so, they illuminate the complexity of female friendships and honor as well as the robust creativity and intellectual work contributed by women to culture in the long eighteenth century. Women’s tributes to each other sometimes took the form of critical engagement or competition, but they always exposed the feminocentric networks of artistic, social, and material exchange women created and maintained both in and outside of London. This volume advocates for a new perspective for researching and teaching early modern women that is grounded in admiration. Distributed for the University of Delaware Press

The Complete Works of Saint John of the Cross Doctor of the Church

a a the burn is one of sweet love , the wound will be one of sweet love and thus will be sweetly delectable . 7. ... Thus wounds due to another cause have now become wounds of love.1 But there is this difference between this loving burn ...

The Complete Works of Saint John of the Cross  Doctor of the Church


God s Wounds Vol 1

previous analysis of the double-love command discloses this insight. Hence, rather than a hierarchy of relationships, a sort of spherical web of relationships, with God as the ground of them all in the core of that sphere, ...

God s Wounds Vol 1

God's Wounds: Hermeneutic of the Christian Symbol of Divine Suffering, Volume I: Divine Vulnerability and Creation is the first of a three-volume study of Christian testimonies to divine suffering. The larger study focuses its inquiry on the testimonies to divine suffering themselves, seeking to allow the voices that attest to divine suffering to speak freely. The goal is then to discover and elucidate the internal logic or rationality of this family of testimonies, rather than defending these attestations against the dominant claims of classical Christian theism that have historically sought to eliminate such language altogether from Christian discourse about the nature and life of God. In this first volume, the author develops an approach to interpreting the contested claims about the suffering of God. Through this approach to the Christian symbol of divine suffering, he then investigates the two major presuppositions that the larger family of testimonies to divine suffering normally hold: an understanding of God through the primary metaphor of love ('God is love'); and an understanding of the human as created in the image of God, with a life (though finite) analogous to the divine life - the imago Dei as love. When fully elaborated, these presuppositions reveal the conditions of possibility for divine suffering and divine vulnerability with respect to creation.

Wounds and Wound Repair in Medieval Culture

While spending time in that remote space, their physical existence fades away, giving room to their profound love for each other. Since they are privileged to experience that love, there is no need for them to wound themselves and, ...

Wounds and Wound Repair in Medieval Culture

This volume brings together essays that consider wounding and/or wound repair from a wide range of sources and disciplines including arms and armaments, military history, medical history, literature, art history, hagiography, and archaeology across medieval and early modern Europe.

Wing Whispers

I have cried a thousandtears for love And I will cry a thousand more I have raised my voice in anger for love And I willshout until I am hoarse I have endured many wounds for love And I will continue to bleed every last drop Ihave I ...

Wing Whispers


The Origins of the Christian Mystical Tradition

As we have seen, it is by means of love and reliance on God's mercy that the soul enters on this third and highest ... it falls deeply in love with his loveliness and receives from the Word himself a certain dart and wound of love.

The Origins of the Christian Mystical Tradition

Andrew Louth traces the Christian mystic tradition from Plato, through figures such as Origen, Gregory of Nyssa and Augustine and explores the diverse and conflicting influences to be found in Christian spirituality.

Attending the Wounds on Christ s Body

While Teresa does not receive a physical wound, there is nonetheless a kind of inner, “sweet” wound on her heart. ... The piercing of her heart leads her to a heightened sense of God's love which is transforming. What are we to make, ...

Attending the Wounds on Christ   s Body

The disunity of the church is a social and theological scandal for it betrays the prayer of Jesus that we "will be one . . . so that the world will believe" (John 17:21). As a Baptist whose academic background focused on the Orthodox Church and whose teaching has included Catholic and Protestant contexts, this division is for Elizabeth Newman personal and professional. Attending to the Wounds on Christ's Body rests on the conviction that the broad tradition of Christianity already contains resources to heal the church, namely the saints of the church. Newman examines especially how Teresa of Avila (1515-1582) speaks to the whole church today in the midst of political, economic, and ecclesial brokenness. Teresa's reliance upon three scriptural figures--dwellings, marriage, and pilgrimage--helps make sense of an ecclesial way of life that is inherently unitive, a unity that stands in contrast to that of the nation-state or the global market. Teresa's scriptural journey offers an alternative at once liturgical, political, and economic. This Doctor of the Church provides "medicine" that can repair wounds of division that separate brothers and sisters in Christ.

What Are These Wounds

Thou shalt love! Love God with thy whole heart and thy whole soul and with thy whole mind, and thy neighbor as thyself. Christ came in Person to ask St. Lutgarde to spend the last year of her life in the allexclusive exercise of the ...

What Are These Wounds


Deep Wounds Deep Healing

Kids are open and vulnerable,ableto relax with Jesus, sit inHis lap andreceive His love, just asthey accepttheir parents' love. We liketo guide the person to picturehimself or herself in Jesus' arms, then walking with Him through ...

Deep Wounds  Deep Healing

A poor self-image. Chronic depression. A bitter divorce. The trauma of sexual abuse. Why do some wounds fester and refuse to heal, even after we seek help from those who specialize in treating deep emotional pain? Kraft believes that in order to experience real and lasting freedom from a painful past, we must understand the powerful link between spiritual warfare and inner healing. It is only when we recognize and reject the enemy's influence on our most hurtful memories that we can receive complete restoration in mind, heart, and spirit. Deep Wounds, Deep Healing is a complete guide to deep-level healing. Whether readers are seeking restoration for themselves or for those under their care, this book will enable them to recognize the spiritual roots of emotional wounds and invite God's presence into those darkest of places. His power is the hope of freedom and inner healing.

Rich Wounds

Even as phrase after phrase tells of his glory, the one that has arrested me most over the years is “rich wounds.” Crown him the Lord of love! Behold his hands and side—Rich wounds, yet visible above, In beauty glorified.

Rich Wounds

Profound reflections on the cross that help you to meditate on and marvel at the sacrificial love of Jesus. This book can be used as a devotional, especially during Lent and Easter. These profound reflections on the cross from David Mathis, author of The Christmas We Didn’t Expect, will help you to meditate on and marvel at Jesus’ life, sacrificial death, and spectacular resurrection-enabling you to treasure anew who Jesus is and what he has done. Many of us are so familiar with the Easter story that it becomes easy to miss subtle details and difficult to really enjoy its meaning. This book will help you to pause and marvel at Jesus, whose now-glorified wounds are a sign of his unfailing love and the decisive victory that he has won: “He was pierced for our transgressions, he was crushed for our iniquities; the punishment that brought us peace was on him, and by his wounds we are healed.” (Isaiah 53:5) This book can be used as a devotional. The chapters on Holy Week make it especially helpful during the Lent season and at Easter.

Let Jesus Heal Your Hidden Wounds

Theirs was a Christian home with deep love, trust and open communication between the parents and the children. When the girl came home after this happened, she immediately went to her room.

Let Jesus Heal Your Hidden Wounds

Most people get hurt and suffer painful memories as a result of living in an imperfect world. But God's original plan for humanity included spiritual, emotional, physical, and relational wholeness. Through the example of Jesus, who heals from the inside out, readers will learn how to experience this wholeness and assist in the healing of others. Let Jesus Heal Your Hidden Wounds speaks to the individual who wants to be or already is involved in healing ministry. This is not another technique for doing healing, but a description of how the prayer minister cooperates with the Holy Spirit to bring healing and deliverance to people with hidden wounds. Each chapter includes several questions for use in a Bible study setting or to provoke further personal reflection. Those called to healing ministries will be taken to a new level of understanding and greater effectiveness from reading and studying this book. And those with hidden wounds will find new hope for restoration and freedom.

The Unhealed Wound

sexual revolution has been won but something about love has also been lost. They almost certainly feel within themselves the poisoned wound of Tristan, the gash that lies at the heart of this legend and a dozen kindred myths.

The Unhealed Wound

Kennedy, a psychologist, former priest, and a leading Catholic author and scholar, addresses one of the most compelling yet undiscussed issues in the Church: human sexuality. The Unhealed Wound is a penetrating and insightful study of the unresolved conflicts Catholics face regarding both their sexuality and spirituality, deep conflicts which grow more and more serious as they remain unaddressed within the Church. He astutely yet respectfully takes to task a faith that-despite the reality of erotic love as a natural and human aspect of life itself-condemns birth control, marriage for priests, and sex outside of marriage. The Unhealed Wound also examines the Church's formidable hierarchy, challenging those clerics who uphold papal edicts unthinkingly. Articulately postulating our need not only to understand but celebrate our own sexuality, this book will engender both controversy and heated dialogue among today's scholars, students, and believers of Catholicism.