Writing Race Across the Atlantic World

This collection of original essays explores the origins of contemporary notions of race in the oceanic interculture of the Atlantic world in the early modern period.

Writing Race Across the Atlantic World

This collection of original essays explores the origins of contemporary notions of race in the oceanic interculture of the Atlantic world in the early modern period. In doing so, it breaks down institutional boundaries between 'American' and 'British' literature in this early period, as well as between 'history' and 'literature'. Individual essays address the ways in which categories of 'race' - black brown, red and white, African American and Afro-Caribbean, Spanish and Jewish, English and Celtic, native American and Northern European, creole and mestizo - were constructed or adapted by early modern writers. The collection brings together a top collection of historians and literary critics specializing in early modern Britain and early America.

Writing Race Across the Atlantic World

Like other contributors to Writing Race Across the Atlantic World, I aim to compare our contemporary racial ideologies with those of early modern Europe, and to examine the intersection of scientific and literary discourses.

Writing Race Across the Atlantic World

This collection of original essays explores the origins of contemporary notions of race in the oceanic interculture of the Atlantic world in the early modern period. In doing so, it breaks down institutional boundaries between 'American' and 'British' literature in this early period, as well as between 'history' and 'literature'. Individual essays address the ways in which categories of 'race' - black brown, red and white, African American and Afro-Caribbean, Spanish and Jewish, English and Celtic, native American and Northern European, creole and mestizo - were constructed or adapted by early modern writers. The collection brings together a top collection of historians and literary critics specializing in early modern Britain and early America.

Religion Space and the Atlantic World

Kathleen Wilson, introduction, The Island Race: Englishness, Empire, and Gender in the Eighteenth Century (New York: ... of the Origins of Native American Peoples,” in Writing Race across the Atlantic World: Medieval to Modern, ed.

Religion  Space  and the Atlantic World

While the concept of an Atlantic world has been central to the work of historians for decades, the full implications of that spatial setting for the lives of religious people have received far less attention. In Religion, Space, and the Atlantic World, John Corrigan brings together research from geographers, anthropologists, literature scholars, historians, and religious studies specialists to explore some of the possibilities for and benefits of taking physical space more seriously in the study of religion. Focusing on four domains that most readily reflect the importance of Atlantic world spaces for the shape and practice of religion (texts, design, distance, and civics), these essays explore subjects as varied as the siting of churches on the Peruvian Camino Real, the evolution of Hispanic cathedrals, Methodist identity in nineteenth-century Canada, and Lutherans in early eighteenth-century America. Such essays illustrate both how the organization of space was driven by religious interests and how religion adapted to spatial ordering and reordering initiated by other cultural authorities. The case studies include the erasure of Native American sacred spaces by missionaries serving as cartographers, which contributed to a view of North America as a vast expanse of unmarked territory ripe for settlement. Spanish explorers and missionaries reorganized indigenous-built space to impress materially on people the "surveillance power" of Crown and Church. The new environment and culture often transformed old institutions, as in the reconception of the European cloister into a distinctly American space that offered autonomy and solidarity for religious women and served as a point of reference for social stability as convents assumed larger public roles in the outside community. Ultimately even the ocean was reconceptualized as space itself rather than as a connector defined by the land masses that it touched, requiring certain kinds of religious orientations—to both space and time—that differed markedly from those on land. Collectively the contributors examine the locations and movement of people, ideas, texts, institutions, rituals, power, and status in and through space. They argue that just as the mental organization of our activity in the world and our recall of events have much to do with our experience of space, we should take seriously the degree to which that experience more broadly influences how we make sense of our lives.

Encyclopedia of the Atlantic World 1400 1900 Europe Africa and the Americas in An Age of Exploration Trade and Empires 2 volumes

Writing Race across the Atlantic World: Medieval to Modern. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Weaver, Jace. 2014. The Red Atlantic: American Indigenes and the Making of the Modern World, 1000–1927. Chapel Hill: The University of North ...

Encyclopedia of the Atlantic World  1400   1900  Europe  Africa  and the Americas in An Age of Exploration  Trade  and Empires  2 volumes

A first-of-its-kind reference resource traces the interactions among four Atlantic-facing continents—Europe, Africa, and the Americas (including the Caribbean)—between 1400 and 1900. • Provides readers with authoritative information on the people, places, events, and commodities at the heart of Atlantic history • Demonstrates the interconnections among people, places, and events from different regions, overcoming the tendency to see history as limited by national boundaries • Offers balanced coverage of the field of Atlantic history, with entries addressing a variety of geographies and periods to provide a panoramic view • Portrays familiar historical topics in a new light by emphasizing their international context

Women Religion and the Atlantic World 1600 1800

Stanford University Press, 2000); Rebecca Ann Bach, Colonial Transformations: The Cultural Production of the New Atlantic World, 1580−1640 (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2000); Philip Beidler and Gary Taylor, eds., Writing Race across ...

Women  Religion  and the Atlantic World  1600 1800

"Women, Religion, and the Atlantic World reevaluates many assumptions rooted in research on the Columbian exchange. the industrial era. European-based empires, and broad themes such as colonialism and revolution. While placing women and religion at the forefront of inquiry, the volume extends the boundaries of interdisciplinarity and furthers transcultural dialogue among scholars of Europe. the Americas. and Africa."--BOOK JACKET.

Literature and Culture Oxford Bibliographies Online Research Guide

Writing Race Across the Atlantic World, 1492–1789. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. Collection focuses on theories of race in the Atlantic world, including discussion of AfricanAmerican and Afro-Caribbean, Spanish and Jewish, ...

Literature and Culture  Oxford Bibliographies Online Research Guide

This ebook is a selective guide designed to help scholars and students of the ancient world find reliable sources of information by directing them to the best available scholarly materials in whatever form or format they appear from books, chapters, and journal articles to online archives, electronic data sets, and blogs. Written by a leading international authority on the subject, the ebook provides bibliographic information supported by direct recommendations about which sources to consult and editorial commentary to make it clear how the cited sources are interrelated. This ebook is just one of many articles from Oxford Bibliographies Online: Atlantic History, a continuously updated and growing online resource designed to provide authoritative guidance through the scholarship and other materials relevant to the study of Atlantic History, the study of the transnational interconnections between Europe, North America, South America, and Africa, particularly in the early modern and colonial period. Oxford Bibliographies Online covers most subject disciplines within the social science and humanities, for more information visit www.oxfordbibliographies.com.

Beyond the Black Atlantic

African Presence in Early Europe, New Brunswick and London: Transaction Publishers, 2000; also P. Beidler and G. Taylor (eds) Writing Race Across the Atlantic World: Medieval to Modern, Houndsmills: Macmillan, 2005.

Beyond the Black Atlantic

Debates about the ‘Black Atlantic’ have alerted us to an experience of modernization that diverges from the dominant Western narratives of globalization and technological progress. This outstanding volume expands the concept of the Black Atlantic by reaching beyond the usual African-American focus of the field, presenting fresh perspectives on postcolonial experiences of technology and modernization. A team of renowned contributors come together in this volume in order to: redefine and expand ideas of Black Atlantic challenge unified concepts of modernization from a postcolonial perspective question fashionable concepts of the transnational by returning to the local and the national offer new approaches to cross-cultural mechanisms of exchange explore utopian uses of technology in the postcolonial sphere. Exploring a variety of national, diasporan and transnational counternarratives to Western modernization, Beyond the Black Atlantic makes a valuable contribution to the fields of postcolonial, literary and cultural studies.

Envisioning Others Race Color and the Visual in Iberia and Latin America

... 2011).17 Other recent publications take a wider geographical perspective that is deliberately multidisciplinary, although still predominantly historical and literary; these include Writing Race Across the Atlantic World: Medieval to ...

Envisioning Others  Race  Color  and the Visual in Iberia and Latin America

Envisioning Others offers a multidisciplinary view of the relationship between race and visual culture in the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking world, from the kingdoms of Spain and Portugal to colonial Peru and Colombia, post-Independence Mexico, and the pre-Emancipation United States.

Writing Captivity in the Early Modern Atlantic

Circulations of Knowledge and Authority in the Iberian and English Imperial Worlds Lisa Voigt ... Survival,”in Philip D. Beidler and Gary Taylor, Writing Race across the Atlantic World: Medieval to Modern (New York, 2005), 9–26, esp.

Writing Captivity in the Early Modern Atlantic

Drawing on texts written by and about European and Euro-American captives in a variety of languages and genres, Lisa Voigt explores the role of captivity in the production of knowledge, identity, and authority in the early modern imperial world. The practice of captivity attests to the violence that infused relations between peoples of different faiths and cultures in an age of extraordinary religious divisiveness and imperial ambitions. But as Voigt demonstrates, tales of Christian captives among Muslims, Amerindians, and hostile European nations were not only exploited in order to emphasize cultural oppositions and geopolitical hostilities. Voigt's examination of Spanish, Portuguese, and English texts reveals another early modern discourse about captivity--one that valorized the knowledge and mediating abilities acquired by captives through cross-cultural experience. Voigt demonstrates how the flexible identities of captives complicate clear-cut national, colonial, and religious distinctions. Using fictional and nonfictional, canonical and little-known works about captivity in Europe, North Africa, and the Americas, Voigt exposes the circulation of texts, discourses, and peoples across cultural borders and in both directions across the Atlantic.

Theorising the Ibero American Atlantic

GENDER IN THE ATLANTIC WORLD: WOMEN'S WRITING IN IBERIA AND LATIN AMERICA Lisa Vollendorf and Grady C. Wray Scholarship of the ... eds., Writing Race Across the Atlantic World, 1492–1789 (NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2002); Lauren Benton, ...

Theorising the Ibero American Atlantic

Theorising the Ibero-American Atlantic offers fresh and challenging perspectives on the Atlantic turn in Hispanic and Latin American studies. Contributors, while mindful of its limits, explore and establish the viability and value of the Ibero-American Atlantic as a framework of enquiry.

Ideas of Race Oxford Bibliographies Online Research Guide

Writing Race Across the Atlantic World: Medieval to Modern. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005. DOI: 10.1057/9781403980830 Good collection of nine essays addressing the subject of race in relation to Native Americans, the development of ...

Ideas of Race  Oxford Bibliographies Online Research Guide

This ebook is a selective guide designed to help scholars and students of the ancient world find reliable sources of information by directing them to the best available scholarly materials in whatever form or format they appear from books, chapters, and journal articles to online archives, electronic data sets, and blogs. Written by a leading international authority on the subject, the ebook provides bibliographic information supported by direct recommendations about which sources to consult and editorial commentary to make it clear how the cited sources are interrelated. This ebook is just one of many articles from Oxford Bibliographies Online: Atlantic History, a continuously updated and growing online resource designed to provide authoritative guidance through the scholarship and other materials relevant to the study of Atlantic History, the study of the transnational interconnections between Europe, North America, South America, and Africa, particularly in the early modern and colonial period. Oxford Bibliographies Online covers most subject disciplines within the social science and humanities, for more information visit www.oxfordbibliographies.com.

Race and Displacement

ing from “Writing race across the atlantic World” to “english and ethnicity” and “eruptions of funk.” The latest event, in 2011, brought together an array of international researchers and writers on the corpus linguistics. a central ...

Race and Displacement

Race and Displacement captures a timely set of discussions about the roles of race in displacement, forced migrations, nation and nationhood, and the way continuous movements of people challenge fixed racial definitions. The multifaceted approach of the essays in Race and Displacement allows for nuanced discussions of race and displacement in expansive ways, exploring those issues in transnational and global terms. The contributors not only raise questions about race and displacement as signifying tropes and lived experiences; they also offer compelling approaches to conversations about race, displacement, and migration both inside and outside the academy. Taken together, these essays become a case study in dialogues across disciplines, providing insight from scholars in diaspora studies, postcolonial studies, literary theory, race theory, gender studies, and migration studies. The contributors to this volume use a variety of analytical and disciplinary methodologies to track multiple articulations of how race is encountered and defined. The book is divided by editors Maha Marouan and Merinda Simmons into four sections: “Race and Nation” considers the relationships between race and corporality in transnational histories of migration using literary and oral narratives. Essays in “Race and Place” explore the ways spatial mobility in the twentieth century influences and transforms notions of racial and cultural identity. Essays in “Race and Nationality” address race and its configuration in national policy, such as racial labeling, federal regulations, and immigration law. In the last section, “Race and the Imagination” contributors explore the role imaginative projections play in shaping understandings of race. Together, these essays tackle the question of how we might productively engage race and place in new sociopolitical contexts. Tracing the roles of "race" from the corporeal and material to the imaginative, the essays chart new ways that concepts of origin, region, migration, displacement, and diasporic memory create understandings of race in literature, social performance, and national policy. Contributors: Regina N. Barnett, Walter Bosse, Ashon T. Crawley, Matthew Dischinger, Melanie Fritsh, Jonathan Glover, Delia Hagen, Deborah Katz, Kathrin Kottemann, Abigail G.H. Manzella, Yumi Pak, Cassander L. Smith, Lauren Vedal

Lachgemeinschaften

Writing Race across the Atlantic World : Medieval to Modern . Hg . v . Gary Taylor u . Phil Beidler . New York 2005 , S. 79-92 . 33 Alle Textzitate nach der ältesten Hs . W gemäß der Ausgabe von Smits , Kathryn .

Lachgemeinschaften

Die Buchreihe Trends in Medieval Philology nimmt zentrale Themen der aktuellen mediävistischen Forschungsdebatte auf und gibt wegweisenden Forschungsdiskursen einen Ort in der Fachliteratur. Sie versteht sich als ein Forschungsforum mit höchstem Qualitätsanspruch. Die Reihe bietet besonders auch jüngeren und internationalen Forschern und Forschergruppen die Möglichkeit, innovative Studien und Diskussionen der Fachwelt zu präsentieren.

Black Atlantic in the Age of Revolutions Oxford Bibliographies Online Research Guide

history and biography, this is an excellent study of the Black Atlantic from the perspective of individuals. LITERARY TREATM ENTS While earlier ... Writing Race across the Atlantic World, 1492-1763. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003.

Black Atlantic in the Age of Revolutions  Oxford Bibliographies Online Research Guide

This ebook is a selective guide designed to help scholars and students of the ancient world find reliable sources of information by directing them to the best available scholarly materials in whatever form or format they appear from books, chapters, and journal articles to online archives, electronic data sets, and blogs. Written by a leading international authority on the subject, the ebook provides bibliographic information supported by direct recommendations about which sources to consult and editorial commentary to make it clear how the cited sources are interrelated. This ebook is just one of many articles from Oxford Bibliographies Online: Atlantic History, a continuously updated and growing online resource designed to provide authoritative guidance through the scholarship and other materials relevant to the study of Atlantic History, the study of the transnational interconnections between Europe, North America, South America, and Africa, particularly in the early modern and colonial period. Oxford Bibliographies Online covers most subject disciplines within the social science and humanities, for more information visit www.oxfordbibliographies.com.

Race and Popular Fantasy Literature

In Writing Race Across the Atlantic World, edited by P Beidler and G Taylor, 27–50. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005. Kwaymullina, Ambelin. “Edges, Centres, and Futures: Reflections on Being an Indigenous Speculative Fiction Writer ...

Race and Popular Fantasy Literature

This book illuminates the racialized nature of twenty-first century Western popular culture by exploring how discourses of race circulate in the Fantasy genre. It examines not only major texts in the genre, but also the impact of franchises, industry, editorial and authorial practices, and fan engagements on race and representation. Approaching Fantasy as a significant element of popular culture, it visits the struggles over race, racism, and white privilege that are enacted within creative works across media and the communities which revolve around them. While scholars of Science Fiction have explored the genre’s racialized constructs of possible futures, this book is the first examination of Fantasy to take up the topic of race in depth. The book’s interdisciplinary approach, drawing on Literary, Cultural, Fan, and Whiteness Studies, offers a cultural history of the anxieties which haunt Western popular culture in a century eager to declare itself post-race. The beginnings of the Fantasy genre’s habits of whiteness in the twentieth century are examined, with an exploration of the continuing impact of older problematic works through franchising, adaptation, and imitation. Young also discusses the major twenty-first century sub-genres which both re-use and subvert Fantasy conventions. The final chapter explores debates and anti-racist praxis in authorial and fan communities. With its multi-pronged approach and innovative methodology, this book is an important and original contribution to studies of race, Fantasy, and twenty-first century popular culture.

Race Nation and Reform Ideology in Winnipeg 1880s 1920s

In Writing Race Across the Atlantic World: Mediaeval to Modern, edited by Phillip Beidler and Gary Taylor, 51-76. New York: Palgrave, 2005. Bannerji, Himani. “Politics and the Writing of History.

Race  Nation  and Reform Ideology in Winnipeg  1880s 1920s

Imperial Vanguard analyses the life and thought of four key reformers in Winnipeg. Thisbook places these individuals in the context of a broader and longer history ofcolonialism to provide fresh insight into the history of the reform movement in Canada inthe late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

The Smell of Slavery

Olfactory Racism and the Atlantic World Andrew Kettler ... Benjamin Braude, “Michelangelo and the Curse of Ham: From a Typology of Jew-Hatred to a Genealogy of Racism,” in Writing Race Across the Atlantic World: Medieval to Modern, eds.

The Smell of Slavery

In the Atlantic World, different groups were aromatically classified in opposition to other ethnic, gendered, and class assemblies due to an economic necessity that needed certain bodies to be defined as excremental, which culminated in the creation of a progressive tautology that linked Africa and waste through a conceptual hendiadys born of capitalist licentiousness. The African subject was defined as a scented object, appropriated as filthy to create levels of ownership through discourse that marked African peoples as unable to access spaces of Western modernity. Embodied cultural knowledge was potent enough to alter the biological function of the five senses to create a European olfactory consciousness made to sense the African other as foul. Fascinating, informative, and deeply researched, The Smell of Slavery exposes that concerns with pungency within the Western self were emitted outward upon the freshly dug outhouse of the mass slave grave called the Atlantic World.

She Is Weeping

Signs of Race: Writing Race across the Atlantic World: Medieval to Modern. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005. Benjamin, Ruha. Race after Technology: Abolitionist Tools for the New Jim Code. Cambridge: Polity, 2019. Berger, Dan.

She Is Weeping

Dannelle Gutarra Cordero's expansive study incorporates writers, cultural figures and intellectuals from antiquity to the present day to analyze how discourses on emotion serve to create and maintain White supremacy and racism. Throughout history, scientific theories have played a vital role in the accumulation of power over colonized and racialized people. Scientific intellectual discourses on race, gender, and sexuality characterized Blackness as emotionally distinct in both deficiency and excess, a contrast with the emotional benevolence accorded to Whiteness. Ideas on racialized emotions have simultaneously driven the development of devastating body politics by enslaving structures of power. Bold and thought provoking, She Is Weeping provides a new understanding of racialized emotions in the Atlantic World, and how these discourses proved instrumental to the rise of slavery and racial capitalism, racialized sexual violence, and the expansion of the carceral state.

Strangers in Blood

in Writing Race across the Atlantic World, 1492–1763, edited by Philip Beidler and gary taylor, 27–50. new york and houndmills, Uk: Palgrave Macmillan, 2002. – 'climate and Mastery of the Wilderness in Seventeenth-century new england.

Strangers in Blood

Strangers in Blood explores, in a range of early modern literature, the association between migration to foreign lands and the moral and physical degeneration of individuals. Arguing that, in early modern discourse, the concept of race was primarily linked with notions of bloodline, lineage, and genealogy rather than with skin colour and ethnicity, Jean E. Feerick establishes that the characterization of settler communities as subject to degenerative decline constituted a massive challenge to the fixed system of blood that had hitherto underpinned the English social hierarchy. Considering contexts as diverse as Ireland, Virginia, and the West Indies, Strangers in Blood tracks the widespread cultural concern that moving out of England would adversely affect the temper and complexion of the displaced individual, changes that could be fought only through willed acts of self-discipline. In emphasizing the decline of blood as found at the centre of colonial narratives, Feerick illustrates the unwitting disassembling of one racial system and the creation of another.

Encountering Crises of the Mind

Cosme, writing about banzo with the authority of a medical doctor, gave psychosocial reasons as the cause for the ... 63 Phillip Beidler & Gary Taylor, eds., Writing Race Across the Atlantic World: Medieval to Modern (Basingstoke: ...

Encountering Crises of the Mind

Encountering Crises of the Mind offers social and cultural historical perspectives to mental illness from late medieval times to modern age.