You Sound Like a White Girl

In You Sound Like a White Girl, Julissa offers a bold new promise: Belonging only comes through celebrating yourself, your history, your culture, and everything that makes you uniquely you.

You Sound Like a White Girl

Nationally bestselling author Julissa Arce interweaves her own experiences with cultural commentary in a powerful polemic against the myth that assimilation leads to happiness and belonging for immigrants in America. Instead, she calls for a celebration of our uniqueness, our origins, our heritage, and the beauty of the differences that actually make us Americans. “You sound like a white girl.” These were the words spoken to Julissa by a crush as she struggled to find her place in America. As a brown immigrant from Mexico, assimilation had been demanded of her since the moment she set foot in San Antonio, Texas, in 1994. She’d spent so much time getting rid of her accent so no one could tell English was her second language that in that moment she felt those words--you sound like a white girl--were a compliment. As a child, she didn’t yet understand that assimilating to “American” culture really meant imitating “white” America—that ‘sounding like a white girl’ was a racist idea meant to tame her, change her, and make her small. She ran the race, completing each stage, but never quite fit in, until she stopped running altogether. In this dual polemic and manifesto, Julissa dives into and tears apart the lie that assimilation leads to belonging. She combs through history and her own story to break down this myth, arguing that assimilation is a moving finish line designed to keep Black and brown Americans and immigrants chasing racist American ideals. She talks about the Lie of Success, the Lie of Legality, the Lie of Whiteness, and the Lie of English – each promising that if you obtain these things, you will reach acceptance--you won’t be an outsider anymore. Instead, Julissa deftly argues, these demands leave her and those like her in a purgatory – neither able to secure the power and belonging of whiteness nor find it in the community and cultures whiteness demands we leave behind. Here Julissa offers a bold new promise: Belonging only comes through celebrating yourself, your history, your culture, and everything that makes you uniquely you. Only in turning away from the white gaze can we truly make America beautiful. An America where difference is celebrated, heritage is shared and embraced, and belonging is for everyone. Through unearthing veiled history and reclaiming her own identity, Julissa shows us how to do this.

Love War Stories

He seems so glad to have me there, and I think back to the first day we met. He tells everyone how I go to some fancy ... She sucks her teeth at me and is like, “You talk funny. Where you from? ... Why do you sound like a white girl?

Love War Stories

“Arrests the heart with its stunning exploration of women who are put through a kind of hell in their determination to find true love . . . extraordinary.” —Angie Cruz, author of Dominicana Finalist for the 2019 PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction Finalist for the 2018 Foreword Reviews INDIES Award Best Book/Most Anticipated Book/Recommended Read of 2018: Cosmopolitan.com, The Root, Electric Literature, Bustle, Book Riot, PEN America, PopSugar, The Rumpus, B*tch, Remezcla, Mitú, and other publications. Puerto Rican girls are brought up to want one thing: true love. Yet they are raised by women whose lives are marked by broken promises, grief, and betrayal. While some believe that they’ll be the ones to finally make it work, others swear not to repeat cycles of violence. This collection documents how these “love wars” break out across generations as individuals find themselves caught in the crosshairs of romance, expectations, and community. “A tough smart dazzling debut by a tough smart dazzling writer. Ivelisse Rodriguez is a revelation.” —Junot Díaz, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of This Is How You Lose Her “[An] exceptional collection of short stories . . . Filled with memorable characters and sharp writing, this book will leave you breathless.” —Bustle “Rodriguez conceives exquisite misery and makes alchemy of hopelessness in her debut short story collection.” —Electric Literature “[A] perceptive exploration of love, heartbreak, and womanhood.” —The Seattle Review of Books “This reviewer kept returning to [these stories] for their freshness, urgency, and sheer heart.” —Library Journal “Throughout the collection, Rodriguez’s prose pulls you in, and her characters will stay with you even when the stories are only a few pages long.” —BUST “Both heartbreaking and insightful.” —Publishers Weekly “Stunning.” —MyDomaine

IN THE SHADOW OF DEATH

mature women for this position because of my girls' young ages.” Mrs. Fienberg told me the position ... When he and I were engaged in a serious and most heated conversation, he suddenly said, “Mary Kathryn, you sound like a white girl.

IN THE SHADOW OF DEATH

Maléa's story not only changed her life but also changed the life of her entire family. When I began writing this story, it was spoken in my spirit that this was much more than a story about a girl who the medical community thought was dying, who had been in coma for many months, of which she came out of successfully, nor was it about the number of painful medical procedures and traumatic episodes she had to endure while on this horrific and painful journey. Rather it was a story about a miraculous journey that a daughter and mother had been destined to travel together as a divine living testimony for those who dare to believe that there is a God, an all-powerful God, a God that is all seeing and all knowing who has powers that are far beyond man's diminutive mind and understanding! This phenomenal experience Maléa and I had not only reaches far beyond her and my understanding, but, I dare say, also reaches beyond everyone's mind who was there at the time when this happened and those who witnessed for themselves the unbelievable miraculous finish of it all, and who are still baffled and still marvel at how well mentally and physically Maléa turned out from all that she endured throughout this terrible medical journey. I call Maléa's medical ordeal a journey because of the length of time it took before any changes could be seen, and also because of the many difficult medical problems that Maléa and I traveled together, hers being physically painful and mine with her emotionally for five years.

Parade of Shades

Why is it that you refer to black females as women, but white females are always girls? ... I might like black theater, but why can't I like white theater, too? ... You sound like a snow person using old slang with proper grammar.

Parade of Shades

For the better part of her young life, Karen Baker reacts to people who either praise or resent her tawny complexion. When her mother abandons the family, she is left to help raise her younger siblings as her father unfortunately is absent even when he is at home. A biracial woman from a mentor program shows her new ways of looking at things and a positive change begins in Karen. However, Karen quickly learns everything has a price. Lacking a sense of belonging, Karen feels misunderstood in high school and defensive in college. Her failed romances with men of various ethnic groups make things even worse. As she journeys through her life, she gives up the idea that light skin and long hair are the main definitions of beauty. She also stops believing college graduates are better than people who do not have advanced education. Similar to Passin by Karen E. Quinones Miller and Good Hair by Benilde Little, this novel explores African-Americans internal color and cultural discrimination.

Coffee Will Make You Black

think I don't be noticing how your eyes be lighting up when you talk about her. Well, it ain't natural, ... “Okay, fine, then what did Sean say after you acted a fool? ... “Stevie, you sound like a white girl, like a white hippie.

Coffee Will Make You Black

“A funny, fresh novel about growing up African-American in 1960s Chicago” by an author who “writes like Terry McMillan’s kid sister” (Entertainment Weekly). In this hilarious and insightful coming-of-age novel, author April Sinclair introduces the charming Jean “Stevie” Stevenson, a young woman raised on Chicago’s South Side during an era of irrevocable social upheaval. Curious and witty, bold but naïve, Stevie grows up debating the qualities of good hair and dark skin. As the years pass, her family and neighborhood are changed by the times, from the War on Poverty to race riots and the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., from “Black Is Beautiful” to Black Power. Against this remarkable backdrop, Stevie makes the sometimes harrowing, often comic, always enthralling transformation into a young adult—socially aware, discovering her sexuality, and proud of her identity. “Whether she’s dealing with a subject as monumental as the civil rights movement or as intimate as Stevie’s first sexual encounters,” writes the Los Angeles Times, “Sinclair never fails to make you laugh and never sacrifices the narrative to make a point.” Winner of the Carl Sandburg Award from the Friends of the Chicago Public Library and named a best book of the year in young adult fiction by the American Library Association, Coffee Will Make You Black is an exquisite portrait of adolescence that will resonate with readers of all ages.

You Sound White

One of the girls sitting beside her leaned over and whispered, “Quit tryin' to sound like a white girl.” Tallulah looked at her and opened her mouth to speak but decided to stay quiet. After class, Tallulah went directly to the library, ...

You Sound White

Author Kelly J Morgan has entered the literary world with a novel that will trigger conversations, debates, and intellectual observations for years to come. You Sound White is the story of protagonist Tallulah and a cast of young aspiring African-American women five years post-college. Her writing career has not taken off as she has planned and she is working three jobs to makes ends meet. She has grown up in a world that judges her on her skin color and how she talks. Her life takes an unexpected turn when she befriends a homeless woman named Lily. Tallulah realizes that there is a story there and as Lily’s past materializes, her own life is illuminated and dissected in ways she could have never imagined. You Sound White removes the urban veil away from the most radiant character interactions you have ever read with poignant dialogue that rides along a pragmatic plot that will have you hanging on each and every chapter. Author Kelly Morgan writes like a seasoned veteran and has elevated the expectations of debut works. She is here to slay.

The Sport of Kings

You let a man run all over—” Marie laid her hands down flat on the table, her face all affront. “Now you sound like the Reverend saying I act like a white girl.” “Ew, nasty!” Beanie held up a shielding hand.

The Sport of Kings

A Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize Winner of the Kirkus Prize for Fiction • A Recipient of the Windham-Campbell Prize for Fiction • A Finalist for the James Tait Black Prize for Fiction • A Finalist for the Baileys Women's Prize for Fiction • A Finalist for the Rathbones Folio Prize • Longlisted for an Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence • One of New York Times Book Review 100 Notable Book Named a Best Book of the Year by Entertainment Weekly • GQ • The New York Times (Selected by Dwight Garner) • NPR • The Wall Street Journal • San Francisco Chronicle • Refinery29 • Booklist • Kirkus Reviews • Commonweal Magazine "In its poetic splendor and moral seriousness, The Sport of Kings bears the traces of Faulkner, Morrison, and McCarthy. . . . It is a contemporary masterpiece."—San Francisco Chronicle Hailed by The New Yorker for its “remarkable achievements,” The Sport of Kings is an American tale centered on a horse and two families: one white, a Southern dynasty whose forefathers were among the founders of Kentucky; the other African-American, the descendants of their slaves. It is a dauntless narrative that stretches from the fields of the Virginia piedmont to the abundant pastures of the Bluegrass, and across the dark waters of the Ohio River; from the final shots of the Revolutionary War to the resounding clang of the starting bell at Churchill Downs. As C. E. Morgan unspools a fabric of shared histories, past and present converge in a Thoroughbred named Hellsmouth, heir to Secretariat and a contender for the Triple Crown. Newly confronted with one another in the quest for victory, the two families must face the consequences of their ambitions, as each is driven---and haunted---by the same, enduring question: How far away from your father can you run? A sweeping narrative of wealth and poverty, racism and rage, The Sport of Kings is an unflinching portrait of lives cast in the shadow of slavery and a moral epic for our time.

Homegoing

Like what?” Marjorie asked, and Tisha had repeated it, her accent turning almost British in order to capture her ... “I have to read it for class,” Tisha mimicked. “You sound like a white girl. White girl. White girl. White girl.

Homegoing

A BBC Top 100 Novels that Shaped Our World Effia and Esi: two sisters with two very different destinies. One sold into slavery; one a slave trader's wife. The consequences of their fate reverberate through the generations that follow. Taking us from the Gold Coast of Africa to the cotton-picking plantations of Mississippi; from the missionary schools of Ghana to the dive bars of Harlem, spanning three continents and seven generations, Yaa Gyasi has written a miraculous novel - the intimate, gripping story of a brilliantly vivid cast of characters and through their lives the very story of America itself. Epic in its canvas and intimate in its portraits, Homegoing is a searing and profound debut from a masterly new writer. 'This incredible book travels from Ghana to the US revealing how slavery destroyed so many families, traditions and lives - and how its terrifying impact is still reverberating now. Gyasi has created a story of real power and insight' Stylist, the Decade's 15 Best Books by Remarkable Women Selected for Granta's Best of Young American Novelists 2017 Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Best First Book Shortlisted for the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction Shortlisted for the Beautiful Book Award 2017

Teaching Black History to White People

“Seeing other Black women wear their hair natural has inspired me to do the same.” • “'You don't sound like you're Black, you sound like a white girl.'” • “Because society taught us that people with lighter skin were superior, we craved ...

Teaching Black History to White People

Leonard Moore has been teaching Black history for twenty-five years, mostly to white people. Drawing on decades of experience in the classroom and on college campuses throughout the South, as well as on his own personal history, Moore illustrates how an understanding of Black history is necessary for everyone. With Teaching Black History to White People, which is “part memoir, part Black history, part pedagogy, and part how-to guide,” Moore delivers an accessible and engaging primer on the Black experience in America. He poses provocative questions, such as “Why is the teaching of Black history so controversial?” and “What came first: slavery or racism?” These questions don’t have easy answers, and Moore insists that embracing discomfort is necessary for engaging in open and honest conversations about race. Moore includes a syllabus and other tools for actionable steps that white people can take to move beyond performative justice and toward racial reparations, healing, and reconciliation.

Into White

“Do I talk white or black?” “You sound like a white girl to me. Your skin is the darkest in the family, but even when you were a little girl, you always talked proper. You get that skin from your daddy's side, by the way.

Into White

LaToya Williams lives in Montgomery, Alabama, and attends a mostly white high school. It seems as if her only friend is her older brother, Alex. Toya doesn’t know where she fits in, but after a run-in with another student, she wonders if life would be different if she were . . . different. And then a higher power answers her prayer: to be “anything but black.” Toya is suddenly white, blond, and popular. Now what? Randi Pink’s audacious fiction debut dares to explore a subject that will spark conversations about race, class, and gender.

In My Girls I Trust

she asked, sounding like a white woman. “Bitch, this is yo' cousin, Keaundra. You sound just like a white girl on the phone, tryin' to sound all professional and shit,” Keaundra laughed. “Damn, you know I gotta answer these phones like ...

In My Girls I Trust

How can three women living three totally different lifestyles have so much in common? Alexis is a single mother of two, with an abusive baby daddy her girls keep pressing her to leave. Between her difficult man and her girls' constant nagging, Alexis is forced to live a double life. Watch as she tries to hold on to a secret that would definitely tear apart any friendship. Keaundra is constantly haunted by a troubled past and lives by the motto "Trust No Man!" This has left her lonely and with plenty of time on her hands. But what happens when she crosses paths with Mr. Right? Will Keaundra let him in, or will her past experiences force her to let him slip away? India is classy, intelligent, loyal, and used to having her way. Between her rich father and her boyfriend, Martell, she wants for nothing. But when her loyalty to her girls starts to affect her relationship, will India have to choose between her best friends and her man, or will he make the choice for her? When life and love get complicated, these three unlikely friends will have some very difficult choices to make.

When Half Is Whole

Living among white people, he came to think of himself as white too. ... Ten years later, like Min-yeong Lee, I too, believed that I was American. ... Others might tell an Asian woman, “You sound like a white girl!

When Half Is Whole

"I listen and gather people's stories. Then I write them down in a way that I hope will communicate something to others, so that seeing these stories will give readers something of value. I tell myself that this isn't going to be done unless I do it, just because of who I am. It's a way of making my mark, leaving something behind . . . not that I'm planning on going anywhere right now." So explains Stephen Murphy-Shigematsu in this touching, introspective, and insightful examination of mixed race Asian American experiences. The son of an Irish American father and Japanese mother, Murphy-Shigematsu uses his personal journey of identity exploration and discovery of his diverse roots to illuminate the journeys of others. Throughout the book, his reflections are interspersed among portraits of persons of biracial and mixed ethnicity and accounts of their efforts to answer a seemingly simple question: Who am I? Here we meet Norma, raised in postwar Japan, the daughter of a Japanese woman and an American serviceman, who struggled to make sense of her ethnic heritage and national belonging. Wei Ming, born in Australia and raised in the San Francisco of the 1970s and 1980s, grapples as well with issues of identity, in her case both ethnic and sexual. We also encounter Rudy, a "Mexipino"; Marshall, a "Jewish, adopted Korean"; Mitzi, a "Blackinawan"; and other extraordinary people who find how connecting to all parts of themselves also connects them to others. With its attention on people who have been regarded as "half" this or "half" that throughout their lives, these stories make vivid the process of becoming whole.

Ain t No Makin It

I went with a girl the year before last, she says to me, “If you only knew how white you sound!” I'm like, “How white I sound? What do you mean, 'How white I sound'? I sound like me, I sound like myself.” She's like, “No, you sound ...

Ain t No Makin  It

This classic text addresses one of the most important issues in modern social theory and policy: how social inequality is reproduced from one generation to the next. With the original 1987 publication of Ain't No Makin' It, Jay MacLeod brought us to the Clarendon Heights housing project where we met the 'Brothers' and the 'Hallway Hangers'. Their story of poverty, race, and defeatism moved readers and challenged ethnic stereotypes. MacLeod's return eight years later, and the resulting 1995 revision, revealed little improvement in the lives of these men as they struggled in the labor market and crime-ridden underground economy. The third edition of this classic ethnography of social reproduction brings the story of inequality and social mobility into today's dialogue. Now fully updated with thirteen new interviews from the original Hallway Hangers and Brothers, as well as new theoretical analysis and comparison to the original conclusions, Ain't No Makin' It remains an admired and invaluable text.

Life and Everything in Between

“So, this is how you sound huh?” she started laughing. “I sound like a white girl huh?” I replied “yes, you do” and we laughed. We spoke for about 20 minutes until her mom and brothers came home. We decided to meet up halfway and chill ...

Life and Everything in Between

I don’t know what to say, I just can’t believe my life went this way. Things fell apart at all corners and I stood directly in the middle of it all. I cried and screamed but no one cared. They could hear me, yet no one cared. The only things I remember was my solitude coming out. Going Into the world so confident then coming out this broken. A woman so strong, destroyed by her own creation. She tried to cling onto a love that wasn’t there. Over and over again, she got left behind until her heart gave out. She settled with someone more broken than herself. Her kids forced to watch her in her worse hours. She had a son that grew to hate her. Her own son, looked at her in shame. He grew to be a man so weak, that he got killed by his strengths. Things just happened, and he didn’t know how to stop it. This is the story of my life. Welcome to a story of falling apart. It started with a relationship, that led to kids. The relationship grew weak. They couldn’t get along, so they separated. Things happened along the way and other kids were born. Each inheriting a curse from their parent. One, got the worse out of the curses. Gifted with many things, still everything gets taken from him. I hope you enjoy the story of my mental destruction.

Psychos A White Girl Problems Book

You sound like Keith Richards after he detoxed in 1977. I'm—I'm glad to have you home. Get settled—dinner is at eight.” The main house on my dad's property is a post-Gothic, ivy-covered precious gem. It's huge but it's cozy, ...

Psychos  A White Girl Problems Book

In this hysterical follow-up to the New York Times bestseller White Girl Problems, Babe Walker travels the globe as she tries to figure out the answer to the question foremost on everyone's mind—including hers: Who is Babe Walker? If you’re one of the hundreds of thousands who devoured Babe Walker’s New York Times bestselling novel White Girl Problems or one of the million people who read her blog or follow her on Twitter daily, then you’ve obviously been waiting with bated breath for her hilarious follow-up novel, Psychos. Fresh from a four-month stint in rehab for her “alleged” shopping addiction, Babe Walker returns home to Bel Air ten pounds lighter (thanks to a stomach virus), having made amends (she told a counselor with bad skin she was smart) and confronted her past (after meeting her birth mother for the first time—a fashion model turned farmer lesbian). Although delighted to be home and determined to maintain her hard-won inner peace, Babe now faces a host of outside forces seemingly intent on derailing her path to positive change. Not only is she being trailed by an anonymous stalker, but she’s also reunited with the love of her life, a relationship that she cannot seem to stop self-sabotaging. Babe’s newfound spirituality, coupled with her faith in the universe and its messages, leads her all over the world: shoulder dancing in Paris, tripping out in Amsterdam, and hooking up in the Mediterranean, only to land her back in New York City, forced to choose between a man who is perfect in every way (except for one small detail) and a man who could be The One if only he didn’t drive Babe to utter insanity. Unapologetic and uproarious, Psychos is the send-up of the season—already as timeless as vintage Dior.

Gardens in the Dunes

Those society women come out from back east, interfere, and then they leave and never write. ... Sister was so angry at that white woman tears filled her eyes, and she could not stop herself. ... "You sound like a white girl!

Gardens in the Dunes

A sweeping, multifaceted tale of a young Native American pulled between the cherished traditions of a heritage on the brink of extinction and an encroaching white culture, Gardens in the Dunes is the powerful story of one woman’s quest to reconcile two worlds that are diametrically opposed. At the center of this struggle is Indigo, who is ripped from her tribe, the Sand Lizard people, by white soldiers who destroy her home and family. Placed in a government school to learn the ways of a white child, Indigo is rescued by the kind-hearted Hattie and her worldly husband, Edward, who undertake to transform this complex, spirited girl into a “proper” young lady. Bit by bit, and through a wondrous journey that spans the European continent, traipses through the jungles of Brazil, and returns to the rich desert of Southwest America, Indigo bridges the gap between the two forces in her life and teaches her adoptive parents as much as, if not more than, she learns from them.

Minority Status Oppositional Culture Schooling

That's another reason why I chose to go to the academy, because I did go to public school for junior high and a lot of the kids were pretty well, “You sound like a White girl,you're stuck up ...

Minority Status  Oppositional Culture    Schooling

This book is the definitive and final presentation of John Ogbu’s cultural ecological model and the many debates that his work has sparked during the past decade. The theory and empirical foundation of Ogbu’s scholarship, which some have mistakenly reduced to the "acting white hypothesis," is fully presented and re-visited in this posthumous collection of his new writings plus the works of over 20 scholars. Ogbu’s own chapters present how his ideas about minority education and culture developed. Readers will find in these chapters the theoretical roots of his cultural ecological model. The book is organized as a dialogue between John Ogbu and the scholarly community, including his most ardent critics; Ogbu’s own work can be read at the same time as his critics have their say. Minority Status, Oppositional Culture, and Schooling examines content, methodological, and policy issues framing the debate on academic achievement, school engagement, and oppositional culture. It brings together in one volume, for the first time, some of the most critical works on these issues as well as examples of programs aimed at re-engagement. In addition to African Americans, it also looks at school engagement among Native American and Latino students. This book is essential reading for anyone interested in the study of the academic achievement gap.

Angels with Dirty Faces

has plagued me my whole life, as has the Black counterpart of “How come you sound like a white girl?” It stands not as a challenge, but a test: will you abandon those darker who grew out of scorched earth, with no white mothershade to ...

Angels with Dirty Faces

"There was a time I believed prisons existed to rehabilitate people, to make our communities safer. . . . When I saw for the first time (but not the last) a mother sobbing and clutching her son when visiting hours were up, only to be physically pried off and escorted out by guards, I knew nothing about that made me safer. This is the heart of this country's prison system. And the prison system has become the heart of America."—Walidah Imarisha, from the introduction. This is no romanticized tale of crime and punishment. The three lives in this creative nonfiction account are united by the presence of actual harm—sometimes horrific violence. Walidah Imarisha, a sexual assault survivor, brings us behind prison walls to visit her incarcerated brother Kakamia and his fellow inmate Jimmy "Mac" McElroy, a member of the Irish gang the Westies. Together they explore the questions: People can do unimaginable damage to one another—and then what? What do we as a society do? What might redemption look like? Imarisha doesn't flinch as she guides us through the complexities and contradictions of transformative justice, eschewing theory for a much messier reality. The result is a nuanced and deeply personal analysis that allows readers to connect emotionally with the stories she shares, and the people behind them. Walidah Imarisha is a writer, organizer, educator, and spoken-word artist. She is the co-editor of Octavia's Brood: Science Fiction Stories From Social Justice Movements and author of the collection of poetry Scars/Stars.

A Second Helping of Gumbo for the Soul

Like many academic environments, my high school was historically White due to the remnants of legal segregation within ... All I know is that I became frustrated with hearing, “You sound like a White girl,” from my friends and family ...

A Second Helping of Gumbo for the Soul

A Second Helping of Gumbo for the Soul is a collection of essays, stories, and narratives designed to inspire and empower women of color through the use of storytelling and narratives. This second edition is a sequel to the first Gumbo for the Soul and includes more...

Constructing Digital Cultures

... Twitter was also used as a space to affirm one's racial identity, especially for African American women: #HowItFeelsToBeABlackGirl when every time you speak proper English you constantly get told you sound like a “whitegirl.

Constructing Digital Cultures

Announcing presidential decisions, debating social issues, disputing the latest developments in television shows, and sharing funny memes—Twitter has become a space where ordinary citizens and world-leaders alike share their thoughts and ideas. As a result, some argue Twitter has leveled the playing field, while others reject this view as too optimistic. This has led to an ongoing debate about the platform’s democratizing potential and whether activity on Twitter engenders change or merely magnifies existing voices. Constructing Digital Cultures explores these issues and more through an in-depth examination of how Twitter users collaborate to create cultural understandings. Looking closely at how user-generated narratives renegotiate dominant ideas about gender and race, it provides insight into the nature of digital culture produced on Twitter and the platform’s potential as a virtual public sphere. This volume investigates arenas of discussion often seen on Twitter—from entertainment and popular culture to politics, social justice issues, and advertising—and looks into how members of ethnic minority groups use and relate to the platform. Through an in-depth examination of individual expressions, the different kinds of dialogue that characterize the platform, and various ways in which people connect, Constructing Digital Cultures provides a critical, empirically based consideration of Twitter’s potential as an inclusive, egalitarian public sphere for the modern age.